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Page 13. (In Famous people part 1)  November 2011

Vanessa Redgrave Judi Dench


Anders Gustavsson
Helen Mirren






 









Vanessa Redgrave, (637)
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Vanessa Redgrave


 
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia


Redgrave at the Berlin Film Festival, 2011

Born

30 January 1937 (1937-01-30) (age 74)
Greenwich, London, England

Occupation

Actress

Years active

1956–present

Spouse

Tony Richardson
(m. 1962–1967, divorced)
Franco Nero (m. 2006–present)

Children

Natasha Richardson (deceased)
Joely Richardson
Carlo Gabriel Nero

Parents

Michael Redgrave (deceased)
Rachel Kempson (deceased)

Relatives

Corin Redgrave
(brother, deceased)
Lynn Redgrave
(sister, deceased)

Vanessa Redgrave, CBE (born 30 January 1937) is an English actress of stage, screen and television, as well as a political activist.

 



HIDE TEXT

 

She rose to prominence in 1961 playing Rosalind in As You Like It with the Royal Shakespeare Company and has since made more than 35 appearances on London's West End and Broadway, winning both the Tony and Olivier Awards. On screen, she has starred in more than 80 films; including Mary, Queen of Scots, Isadora, Julia, The Bostonians, Mission: Impossible and Atonement. Redgrave was proclaimed by Arthur Miller and Tennessee Williams as "the greatest living actress of our times," and she remains the only British actress ever to win the Oscar, Emmy, Tony, Cannes, Golden Globe, and the Screen Actors Guild awards. She was also the recipient of the 2010 BAFTA Fellowship "in recognition of an outstanding and exceptional contribution to film."[1]

A member of the Redgrave family of actors, she is the daughter of the late Sir Michael Redgrave and Lady Redgrave (the actress Rachel Kempson), the sister of the late Lynn Redgrave and the late Corin Redgrave, the mother of Hollywood actresses Joely Richardson and the late Natasha Richardson, and the aunt of British actress Jemma Redgrave.

Personal life and family

Main article: Redgrave family

Redgrave was born in Greenwich, London, the daughter of actors Sir Michael Redgrave and Rachel Kempson. Laurence Olivier announced her birth to the audience at a performance of Hamlet at the Old Vic, when he said that Laertes (played by Sir Michael) had a daughter. She was educated at The Alice Ottley School, Worcester & Queen's Gate School, London before "coming out" as a debutante. Her late siblings, Lynn Redgrave and Corin Redgrave, were also acclaimed actors.

Redgrave's daughters, Natasha Richardson (1963–2009) and Joely Richardson (b. 1965) from her 1962–67 marriage to film director Tony Richardson, also built respected acting careers. Redgrave's son Carlo Gabriel Nero ( Carlo Sparanero), by Italian actor Franco Nero (né Francesco Sparanero), is a writer and film director. She met Franco while filming Camelot in 1967, the year she divorced her husband Tony Richardson, who left her for the French actress Jeanne Moreau. Redgrave and Nero married on 31 December 2006.[2] She is also the grandmother of Michaél and Daniel Neeson, Daisy Bevan, and Raphael and Lilli Sparanero.

In 1967, Redgrave was made a Commander (CBE) of the Order of the British Empire. It was reported that she declined a damehood in 1999.[3]

From 1971 to 1986, she had a long-term relationship with actor Timothy Dalton, with whom she had starred in the film Mary, Queen of Scots.[citation needed]

Within 14 months in 2009-2010, she lost both a daughter and her two younger siblings. Her daughter Natasha Richardson died on 18 March 2009 from a traumatic brain injury caused by a skiing accident.[4][5] On 6 April 2010, her brother Corin Redgrave died, and on 2 May 2010, her sister Lynn Redgrave died.

Career

Stage

Vanessa Redgrave entered the Central School of Speech and Drama in 1954. She first appeared in the West End, playing opposite her brother, in 1958.

In 1960, Redgrave had her first starring role in Robert Bolt's The Tiger and the Horse, in which she co-starred with her father. In 1962 she played Imogen in William Gaskill's production of Cymbeline for the Royal Shakespeare Company. In 1966 Redgrave created the role of Jean Brodie in the Donald Albery production of The Prime of Miss Jean Brodie, adapted for the stage by Jay Presson Allen from the novel by Muriel Spark. She won four Evening Standard Awards Best Actress Evening Standards Awards for Best Actress in four decades. She was awarded the Laurence Olivier Award for Actress of the Year in a Revival in 1984 for The Aspern Papers

In the nineties, her theatre work included Prospero in The Tempest at Shakespeare's Globe in London. In 2003 she won a Tony Award for Best Actress in a Play for her performance in the Broadway revival of Eugene O'Neill's Long Day's Journey Into Night. In January 2006, Redgrave was presented the Ibsen Centennial Award for her "outstanding work in interpreting many of Henrik Ibsen's works over the last decades."[6] Previous recipients of the award include Liv Ullmann, Glenda Jackson, and Claire Bloom.

In 2007, Redgrave played Joan Didion in her Broadway stage adaptation of her 2005 book, The Year of Magical Thinking, which played 144 regular performances in a 24-week limited engagement at the Booth Theatre. For this, she won the Drama Desk Award for Outstanding One-Person Show and was nominated for the Tony Award for Best Performance by a Leading Actress in a Play. She reprised the role at the Lyttelton Theatre at The Royal National Theatre in London to mixed reviews. She also spent a week performing the work at the Theatre Royal in Bath in September 2008. She once again performed the role of Joan Didion for a special benefit at New York's Cathedral of Saint John the Divine on 26 October 2009. The performance was originally slated to debut on 27 April, but was pushed due to the death of Redgrave's daughter Natasha. The proceeds for the benefit were donated to the United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF) and the United Nations Relief and Works Agency (UNRWA). Both charities work to provide help for the children of Gaza.

In October 2010 she starred in the Broadway premiere of Driving Miss Daisy starring in the title role opposite James Earl Jones. The show premiered on 25 October 2010 at the John Golden Theatre in New York City to rave reviews.[7] The production was originally scheduled to run through 29 January 2011 but due to a successful response and high box office sales, was extended to 9 April 2011.[8] In May 2011, she was nominated for a Tony Award for Best Performance by a Leading Actress in a Play for the role of Daisy in Driving Miss Daisy.[9]

In a poll of "industry experts" and readers conducted by The Stage in 2010, Redgrave was ranked as the ninth greatest stage actor of all time.[10]

Early film work

Highlights of Redgrave's early film career include her first starring role in Morgan: A Suitable Case for Treatment (for which she earned an Oscar nomination, a Cannes award, a Golden Globe nomination and a BAFTA Film Award nomination); her portrayal of a cool London swinger in 1966's Blowup; her spirited portrayal of dancer Isadora Duncan in Isadora (for which she won a National Society of Film Critics Award for Best Actress, a second Prize for the Best Female Performance at the Cannes film festival, along with a Golden Globe and Oscar nomination in 1969); and various portrayals of historical figures – ranging from Andromache in The Trojan Women, to Mary, Queen of Scots in the film of the same name. She also played the role of Guinevere in the film Camelot with Richard Harris and Franco Nero.

Julia, The Palestinian and the Oscar controversy

In 1977, Redgrave funded and narrated a documentary film The Palestinian about Palestinians and the activities of the Palestinian Liberation Organization. That same year she starred in the film Julia, about a woman murdered by the Nazi German regime in the years prior to World War II for her anti-Fascist activism. Her co-star in the film was Jane Fonda (playing writer Lillian Hellman), who, in her 2005 autobiography, noted that:

there is a quality about Vanessa that makes me feel as if she resides in a netherworld of mystery that eludes the rest of us mortals. Her voice seems to come from some deep place that knows all suffering and all secrets. Watching her work is like seeing through layers of glass, each layer painted in mythic watercolor images, layer after layer, until it becomes dark – but even then you know you haven't come to the bottom of it ... The only other time I had experienced this with an actor was with Marlon Brando ... Like Vanessa, he always seemed to be in another reality, working off some secret, magnetic, inner rhythm.[11]

When Redgrave was nominated for an Oscar in 1978, for her role in Julia, members of the Jewish Defense League (JDL), led by Rabbi Meir Kahane, burned effigies of Redgrave and picketed the Academy Awards ceremony to protest against both Redgrave and her support of the Palestinian cause.[12]

Redgrave's performance in Julia garnered an Academy Award for Best Supporting Actress. Accepting the award, Redgrave said:

My dear colleagues, I thank you very much for this tribute to my work. I think that Jane Fonda and I have done the best work of our lives, and I think this is in part due to our director, Fred Zinnemann.

And I also think it's in part because we believed and we believe in what we were expressing--two out of millions who gave their lives and were prepared to sacrifice everything in the fight against fascist and racist Nazi Germany.

And I salute you, and I pay tribute to you, and I think you should be very proud that in the last few weeks you've stood firm, and you have refused to be intimidated by the threats of a small bunch of Zionist hoodlums whose behavior is an insult to the stature of Jews all over the world and their great and heroic record of struggle against fascism and oppression.

And I salute that record and I salute all of you for having stood firm and dealt a final blow against that period when Nixon and McCarthy launched a worldwide witch-hunt against those who tried to express in their lives and their work the truth that they believe in. I salute you and I thank you and I pledge to you that I will continue to fight against anti-Semitism and fascism.[13]

Later in the broadcast veteran screenwriter and Oscar presenter Paddy Chayefsky told the audience members that

there's a little matter I'd like to tidy up...at least if I expect to live with myself tomorrow morning. I would like to say that I'm sick and tired of people exploiting the Academy Awards for the propagation of their own personal propaganda. I would like to suggest to Miss Redgrave that her winning an Academy Award is not a pivotal moment in history, does not require a proclamation, and a simple "thank you" would have sufficed.

In 1978, Rabbi Meir Kahane published a book entitled Listen Vanessa, I am a Zionist, which was later renamed Listen World, Listen Jew, in direct response to Redgrave's comments at the Academy Awards. To this day many rightwing Jewish groups, such as the Jewish Defense League, consider Redgrave an opponent and a supporter of terrorism, citing remarks she has made such as, "Zionism is a brutal, racist ideology. And it is a brutal racist regime."[14]

Later film career

 

Vanessa Redgrave

Later film roles of note include those of suffragist Olive Chancellor in The Bostonians (1984, a fourth Best Actress Academy Award nomination), transsexual tennis player Renée Richards in Second Serve (1986); Mrs. Wilcox in Howards End (1992, her sixth Academy Award nomination, this time in a supporting role); crime boss Max in Mission: Impossible (1996, when discussing the role of Max, DePalma and Cruise thought it would be fun to cast an actor like Redgrave; they then decided to go with the real thing); Oscar Wilde’s mother in Wilde (1997); Clarissa Dalloway in Mrs. Dalloway (1997); and Dr. Sonia Wick in Girl, Interrupted (1999). Many of these roles and others, garnered her various accolades.

Her performance as a lesbian grieving the loss of her longtime partner in the HBO series If These Walls Could Talk 2 earned her a Golden Globe for “Best TV Series Supporting Actress” in 2000, as well as earning an Emmy Award for Outstanding Supporting Actress in a TV Movie or Miniseries. This same performance also led to an “Excellence in Media Award” by the Gay & Lesbian Alliance Against Defamation (GLAAD). The award honours “a member of the entertainment community who has made a significant difference in promoting equal rights for lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgendered people”. In 2004, Redgrave joined the second season cast of the hit FX series Nip/Tuck, portraying Dr. Erica Noughton, the mother of Julia McNamara, who is played by her real-life daughter Joely Richardson. She also made appearances in the third and sixth seasons. In 2006, Redgrave starred opposite Peter O'Toole in the acclaimed film Venus. A year later, Redgrave starred in Evening and the acclaimed Atonement, in which she garnered a Broadcast Film Critics Association award nomination for her performance that only took up seven minutes of screen time. In 2008, Redgrave appeared as a narrator in an Arts Alliance production, id – Identity of the Soul. In 2009, Redgrave starred in the BBC remake of The Day of the Triffids, with her daughter Joely. In the midst of losing her daughter, Natasha Richardson, Redgrave signed on to play Eleanor of Aquitaine in Ridley Scott's version of Robin Hood, which began filming shortly after Natasha's death. Redgrave later withdrew from the film for personal reasons. The part was given to her Evening co-star Eileen Atkins.[15] She was next seen in Letters to Juliet opposite her husband Franco Nero.

She had small roles in Eva, a Romanian drama film that premiered at the 2010 Cannes Film Festival as well as in Julian Schnabel's Palestinian drama, Miral that was screened at the 67th Venice International Film Festival and played the role of Winnie the Giant Tortoise in the 2010 environmental animated film Animals United. She has a supporting role in the Bosnia-set political drama, The Whistleblower, which premiered at the 2010 Toronto International Film Festival. Both Miral and The Whistleblower are scheduled for US theatrical release in 2011. Redgrave also narrates Patrick Keiller's semi-fictional upcoming documentary, Robinson in Ruins.

She has also filmed leading lady roles for two upcoming 2011 historical films. This includes, Ralph Fiennes' directorial debut of Shakespeare's Coriolanus in which Redgrave plays Volumnia; and Roland Emmerich's Anonymous in which Redgrave plays Queen Elizabeth I.

Political activism

In 1980, Redgrave made her American TV debut as concentration camp survivor Fania Fénelon in the Arthur Miller-scripted TV movie Playing for Time, a part for which she won an Emmy as Outstanding Lead Actress in 1981. The decision to cast Redgrave as Fénelon was, however, a source of controversy. In light of Redgrave's support for the Palestine Liberation Organization (PLO),[16] even Fénelon objected to her casting. Redgrave was perplexed by such hostility, stating in her 1991 autobiography her long-held belief that "the struggle against anti-Semitism and for the self-determination of the Palestinians form a single whole."[17]

In 1984, Redgrave sued the Boston Symphony Orchestra, claiming that the orchestra had fired her from a performance due to her support of the PLO.[18] Lillian Hellman testified in court on Redgrave's behalf.[18] Redgrave won on a count of breach of contract, but did not win on the claim that the Boston orchestra had violated her civil rights by firing her.[18]

In 1995, Redgrave was elected to serve as a UNICEF Goodwill Ambassador.

In December 2002, Redgrave paid £50,000 bail for Chechen separatist Deputy Premier and special envoy Akhmed Zakayev, who had sought political asylum in the United Kingdom and was accused by the Russian government of aiding and abetting hostage-takings in the Moscow Hostage Crisis of 2002—in which 128 hostages lost their lives to the Chechen terrorists during a Russian special forces (OMON) action – and guerrilla warfare against Russia.

At a press conference Redgrave said she feared for Zakayev's safety if he were extradited to Russia on terrorism charges. He would "die of a heart attack" or some other mysterious explanation offered by Russia, she said.[19] On 13 November 2003, a London court rejected the Russian government's request for Zakayev's extradition. Instead, the court accepted a plea by lawyers for Zakayev that he would not get a fair trial, and could even face torture, in Russia. "It would be unjust and oppressive to return Mr Zakayev to Russia," Judge Timothy Workman ruled.[20]

In December 2003 it was revealed that Redgrave had declined the offer of being made a Dame from Tony Blair's New Labour government.[21]

In 2004, Vanessa Redgrave and her brother Corin Redgrave launched the Peace and Progress Party, which campaigned against the Iraq War and for human rights. However, in June 2005 Redgrave left the party.

Redgrave has been an outspoken critic of the "war on terrorism".[22][23] During a June 2005 interview on Larry King Live, Redgrave was challenged on this criticism and on her political views. In response she questioned if there can be true democracy if the political leadership of the United States and Britain does not "uphold the values for which my father's generation fought the Nazis, [and] millions of people gave their lives against the Soviet Union's regime. [Such sacrifice was made] because of democracy and what democracy meant: no torture, no camps, no detention forever or without trial...[Such] techniques are not just alleged [against the governments of the U.S. and Britain], they have actually been written about by the FBI. I don't think it's being 'far left'...to uphold the rule of law."[24]

In March 2006, Redgrave remarked in an interview with US broadcast journalist Amy Goodman: “I don't know of a single government that actually abides by international human rights law, not one, including my own. In fact, [they] violate these laws in the most despicable and obscene way, I would say.”

Goodman’s interview with Redgrave took place in the actress’s West London home on the evening of 7 March, and covered a range of subjects, particularly the cancellation of the Alan Rickman production, My Name is Rachel Corrie, by the New York Theater Workshop. Such a development, said Redgrave, was an "act of catastrophic cowardice" as "the essence of life and the essence of theatre is to communicate about lives, either lives that have ended or lives that are still alive, [and about] beliefs, and what is in those beliefs."[25]

In June 2006, she was awarded a lifetime achievement award from the Transilvania International Film Festival, one of whose sponsors is a mining company named Gabriel Resources. She dedicated the award to a community organisation from Roşia Montană, Romania, which is campaigning against a gold mine that Gabriel Resources is seeking to build near the village. Gabriel Resources placed an "open letter" in The Guardian on 23 June 2006, attacking Redgrave, arguing the case for the mine, and exhibiting support for it among the inhabitants: the open letter is signed by 77 villagers.[26]

In December 2007, Redgrave was named as one of the possible suretors who paid the £50,000 bail for Jamil al-Banna, one of three British residents arrested after landing back in the UK following four years' captivity at Guantanamo Bay. Redgrave has declined to be specific about her financial involvement but said she was "very happy" to be of "some small assistance for Jamil and his wife", adding, "It is a profound honour and I am glad to be alive to be able to do this. Guantanamo Bay (Gitmo) is a concentration camp."[27]

Filmography

Year

Title

Role

Notes

1958

Behind the Mask

Pamela Gray

 

1966

Morgan: A Suitable Case for Treatment

Leonie Delt

Cannes Film Festival Best Actress Award
Nominated –
Academy Award for Best Actress
Nominated –
BAFTA Award for Best Actress in a Leading Role
Nominated –
Golden Globe Award for Best Actress – Motion Picture Musical or Comedy

1966

A Man For All Seasons

Anne Boleyn

 

1966

Blowup

Unnamed

 

1967

Camelot

Guinevere

·                                 Kansas City Film Critics Circle Award for Best Actress tied with Lynn Redgrave for Georgy Girl

·                                 Nominated – Golden Globe Award for Best Actress – Motion Picture Musical or Comedy

1968

Charge of the Light Brigade, TheThe Charge of the Light Brigade

Mrs. Clarissa Morris

 

1968

Sea Gull, TheThe Sea Gull

Nina

 

1968

Isadora

Isadora Duncan

Cannes Film Festival Best Actress Award
National Society of Film Critics Award for Best Actress
Nominated –
Academy Award for Best Actress
Nominated –
Golden Globe Award for Best Actress – Motion Picture Drama

1969

Oh! What a Lovely War

Sylvia Pankhurst

 

1969

Quiet Place in the Country, AA Quiet Place in the Country

Flavia

 

1970

Dropout

Mary

 

1970

Mother with Two Children Expecting Her Third, AA Mother with Two Children Expecting Her Third

 

·                                 Swedish: En mor med två barn väntandes sitt tredje

·                                 Bo Widerberg short film

1971

Mary, Queen of Scots

Mary, Queen of Scots

·                                 David di Donatello Special Award

·                                 Nominated – Academy Award for Best Actress

·                                 Nominated – Golden Globe Award for Best Actress – Motion Picture Drama

1971

Devils, TheThe Devils

Sister Jeanne

 

1971

Vacation

Immacolata Meneghelli

Italian: La vacanza

1971

Trojan Women, TheThe Trojan Women

Andromache

 

1973

Picture of Katherine Mansfield, AA Picture of Katherine Mansfield

Katherine Mansfield

Television film

1974

Murder on the Orient Express

Mary Debenham

 

1975

Out of Season

Ann

 

1976

Seven-Per-Cent Solution, TheThe Seven-Per-Cent Solution

Lola Deveraux

 

1977

Julia

Julia

·                                 Academy Award for Best Supporting Actress

·                                 Golden Globe Award for Best Supporting Actress – Motion Picture

·                                 Kansas City Film Critics Circle Award for Best Supporting Actress

·                                 Los Angeles Film Critics Association Award for Best Supporting Actress

1979

Agatha

Agatha Christie

 

1979

Yanks

Helen

 

1979

Bear Island

Heddi Lindguist

 

1981

Playing for Time

Fania Fenelon

Primetime Emmy Award for Outstanding Lead Actress – Miniseries or a Movie

1982

My Body, My Child

Leenie Cabrezi

Television film

1983

Sing Sing

Queen

 

1983

Wagner

Cosima Wagner

Television miniseries, re-released as a feature film on DVD

1984

Bostonians, TheThe Bostonians

Olive Chancellor

·                                 National Society of Film Critics Award for Best Actress

·                                 Nominated – Academy Award for Best Actress

·                                 Nominated – Golden Globe Award for Best Actress – Motion Picture Drama

1985

Wetherby

Jean Travers

National Society of Film Critics Award for Best Actress

1985

Three Sovereigns for Sarah

Sarah Cloyce

 

1985

Steaming

Nancy

 

1986

Comrades

Mrs. Carlyle

 

1986

Peter the Great

Sophia

Nominated – Primetime Emmy Award for Outstanding Supporting Actress – Miniseries or a Movie

1986

Second Serve

Richard Radley / Renee Richards

·                                 Nominated – Primetime Emmy Award for Outstanding Lead Actress – Miniseries or a Movie

·                                 Nominated – Golden Globe Award for Best Actress – Miniseries or Television Film

1987

Prick Up Your Ears

Peggy Ramsay

·                                 New York Film Critics Circle Award for Best Supporting Actress

·                                 Nominated – BAFTA Award for Best Actress in a Supporting Role

·                                 Nominated – Golden Globe Award for Best Supporting Actress – Motion Picture

1988

Consuming Passions

Mrs. Garza

 

1988

Man for All Seasons, AA Man for All Seasons

Lady Alice More

Nominated – Golden Globe Award for Best Actress – Miniseries or Television Film

1990

Romeo.Juliet

Mother Capulet

 

1990

Breath of Life

Sister Crucifix

Italian: Diceria dell'untore

1990

Pokhorony Stalina

English journalist

 

1990

Orpheus Descending

Lady Torrance

Television film

1991

Ballad of the Sad Cafe, TheThe Ballad of the Sad Cafe

Miss Amelia

 

1991

Young Catherine

Empress Elizabeth

Nominated – Primetime Emmy Award for Outstanding Supporting Actress – Miniseries or a Movie

1991

What Ever Happened to Baby Jane?

Blanche Hudson

Television film

1992

Howards End

Ruth Wilcox

Nominated – Academy Award for Best Supporting Actress

1993

Wall of Silence, AA Wall of Silence

Kate Benson

Spanish: Un Muro de Silencio

1993

House of the Spirits, TheThe House of the Spirits

Nivea del Valle

 

1993

Sparrow

Sister Agata

Italian: Storia di una capinera

1993

Great Moments in Aviation

Dr. Angela Bead

 

1993

They

Florence Latimer

·                                 Television film

·                                 Also released as Children of the Mist

1994

Mother's Boys

Lydia Madigan

 

1994

Little Odessa

Irina Shapira

Volpi Cup

1995

Month by the Lake, AA Month by the Lake

Miss Bentley

Nominated – Golden Globe Award for Best Actress – Motion Picture Musical or Comedy

1995

The Wind in the Willows

Narrator

Television Film

1996

Mission: Impossible

Max

 

1996

Two Mothers for Zachary

Nancy Shaffell

Television film

1997

Smilla's Sense of Snow

Elsa Lubing

 

1997

Wilde

Lady Speranza Wilde

 

1997

Mrs. Dalloway

Mrs. Clarissa Dalloway

 

1997

Déjà Vu

Skelly

 

1997

Bella Mafia

Graziella Luciano

Nominated – Golden Globe Award for Best Actress – Miniseries or Television Film

1998

Deep Impact

Robin Lerner

 

1998

Lulu on the Bridge

Catherine Moore

 

1999

Cradle Will Rock

Countess Constance LaGrange

 

1999

Uninvited

Mrs. Ruttenburn

 

1999

Girl, Interrupted

Dr. Sonia Wick

 

2000

If These Walls Could Talk 2

Edith Tress (segment "1961")

·                                 Primetime Emmy Award for Outstanding Supporting Actress – Miniseries or a Movie

·                                 Golden Globe Award for Best Supporting Actress – Series, Miniseries or Television Film

·                                 L.A. Outfest Screen Idol Award – Female

·                                 Satellite Award for Best Actress – Miniseries or Television Film

·                                 Screen Actors Guild Award for Outstanding Performance by a Female Actor in a Miniseries or Television Movie

2000

Mirka

Kalsan

 

2000

Rumor of Angels, AA Rumor of Angels

Maddy Bennett

 

2001

Pledge, TheThe Pledge

Annalise Hansen

 

2001

Jack and the Beanstalk: The Real Story

Countess Wilhelmina/Narrator

 

2002

Gathering Storm, TheThe Gathering Storm

Clementine Churchill

·                                 Broadcasting Press Guild Award for Best Actress

·                                 Satellite Award for Best Actress – Miniseries or Television Film

·                                 Nominated – British Academy Television Award for Best Actress

·                                 Nominated – Primetime Emmy Award for Outstanding Lead Actress – Miniseries or a Movie

·                                 Nominated – Golden Globe Award for Best Actress – Miniseries or Television Film

·                                 Nominated – Screen Actors Guild Award for Outstanding Performance by a Female Actor in a Miniseries or Television Movie

2002

Crime and Punishment

Rodian's Mother

 

2002

Searching for Debra Winger

Herself

Documentary

2002

Locket, TheThe Locket

Esther Huish

Television film

2003

Byron

Lady Melbourne

Television film

2003

Good Boy!

Greater Dane, TheThe Greater Dane

 

2004

Fever, TheThe Fever

Woman

Nominated – Screen Actors Guild Award for Outstanding Performance by a Female Actor in a Miniseries or Television Movie

2004–2009

Nip/Tuck

Dr. Erica Noughton

Television series; 10 episodes

2005

Keeper: The Legend of Omar Khayyam, TheThe Keeper: The Legend of Omar Khayyam

Heiress, TheThe Heiress

 

2005

Short Order

Marianne

 

2005

White Countess, TheThe White Countess

Vera Belinskya

 

2006

Thief Lord, TheThe Thief Lord

Sister Antonia

 

2006

Venus

Valerie

Nominated – British Independent Film Award for Best Supporting Actress

2006

Shell Seekers, TheThe Shell Seekers

Penelope Keeling

Television film

2007

Riddle, TheThe Riddle

Roberta Elliot

 

2007

How About You

Georgia Platts

 

2007

Evening

Ann Lord

 

2007

Atonement

Older Briony Tallis

·                                 London Film Critics' Circle Award for British Supporting Actress of the Year

·                                 Nominated – Broadcast Film Critics Association Award for Best Supporting Actress

2008

Restraint

Sky News Reader

 

2008

Ein Job

Hannah Silbergrau

Television film

2008

Gud, lukt och henne

 

 

2009

Eva

Eva

 

2009

Day of the Triffids, TheThe Day of the Triffids

Durrant

Television miniseries

2010

Letters to Juliet

Claire Smith-Wyman

·                                 Nominated – Satellite Award for Best Supporting Actress – Motion Picture

·                                 Nominated – Saturn Award for Best Supporting Actress

2010

Whistleblower, TheThe Whistleblower

Madeleine Rees

 

2010

Miral

Bertha Spafford

 

2010

Animals United

Winnie

English version

2011

Coriolanus

Volumnia

 

2011

Cars 2

Mama Topolino

 

2011

Anonymous

Queen Elizabeth I

post-production

2012

Song for Marion

Marion

Filming[28]

References

1.                               ^ "Vanessa Redgrave to receive Academy Fellowship". BAFTA. 21 February 2010. http://www.bafta.org/press/vanessa-redgrave-to-receive-fellowship,82,SNS.html. Retrieved 26 August 2010. 

2.                               ^ Vanessa Redgrave & Franco Nero. Interview with Amy Goodman. Vanessa Redgrave Combines Lifelong Devotion to Acting and Political Involvement in New HBO Film “The Fever” (.MP3). Democracy Now!. 13 June 2007. Retrieved on 14 May 2007.

3.                               ^ "Some who turned the offer down". The Guardian (London). 22 December 2003. http://www.guardian.co.uk/politics/2003/dec/22/uk.Whitehall1. Retrieved 27 May 2010. 

4.                               ^ "Natasha Richardson dies aged 45". BBC News. 19 March 2009. http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/entertainment/7949195.stm. Retrieved 27 May 2010. 

5.                               ^ "Tears for Natasha: Friends join Liam Neeson and sons for tragic actress' wake". Daily Mail (London). 7 April 2009. http://www.dailymail.co.uk/tvshowbiz/article-1163368/Liam-Neeson-faces-world-saying-private-goodbye-wife-Natasha.html. 

6.                               ^ “Vanessa Redgrave honoured at UK Ibsen Year opening”, Norway – the official site in the UK. accessed 17 December 2006

7.                               ^ Rave reviews for Vanessa Redgrave, ‘sassy’ at 73 after year of family heartbreak London Evening Standard. 26 October 2010

8.                               ^ Driving Miss Daisy Extends Through April 2011 with All Three Stars Playbill. 15 December 2010

9.                               ^ "2011 Tony Nominations Announced! THE BOOK OF MORMON Leads With 14!". broadway world.com. 3 May 2011. http://broadwayworld.com/article/2011-Tony-Nominations-Announced-THE-BOOK-OF-MORMON-Leads-With-14-20110503. Retrieved 5 May 2011. 

10.                           ^ http://www.thestage.co.uk/news/newsstory.php/30744/judi-dench-tops-greatest-stage-actor-poll

11.                           ^ Fonda, Jane. My Life So Far (Random House, New York, 2005) p. 364.

12.                           ^ http://www.emanuellevy.com/oscar/oscar-politics-vanessa-redgrave-2/

13.                           ^ Sharon Waxman (21 March 1999). "The Oscar Acceptance Speech: By and Large, It's a Lost Art". Washington Post. http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-srv/style/movies/oscars/speeches.htm. Retrieved 19 April 2007. 

14.                           ^ "The New Direction Of Vanessa Redgrave". CBS News. 1 June 2007. http://www.cbsnews.com/stories/2007/06/01/60minutes/main2876167.shtml. 

15.                           ^ Vanessa Redgrave – Redgrave Withdraws From Robin Hood – Contactmusic News

16.                           ^ CBS News

17.                           ^ Autobiography (1991) p. 306.

18.                           ^ a b c Martinson, Deborah (2005). Lillian Hellman. Counterpoint Press. p. 357. ISBN 1582433151. 

19.                           ^ “UK actress defends Chechen rebel”, (6 December 2002), BBC News. accessed 17 December 2006

20.                           ^ “Court rejects Chechen extradition”, (13 November 2003), BBC News. accessed 17 December 2006

21.                           ^ Leppard, David; Winnett, Robert (21 December 2003). "Revealed secret list of 300 who scorned honours". The Times (London). http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/news/uk/article1047621.ece?token=null&offset=12&page=2. 

22.                           ^ Redgrave, Vanessa (30 September 2001), “We Need Justice. Bombs Will Only Create More Martyrs”, CommonDreams.org. accessed 17 December 2006

23.                           ^ “Oscar-Winning Actress, Activist Vanessa Redgrave Calls For Justice, Legal and Human Rights For Guantanamo Prisoners” audio, (9 March 2004), Democracy Now!. accessed 17 December 2006

24.                           ^ CNN Larry King Live interview with Vanessa Redgrave transcript, (Aired 18 June 2005), CNN.com. accessed 17 December 2006

25.                           ^ “Legendary Actor Vanessa Redgrave Calls Cancellation of Rachel Corrie Play an ‘Act of Catastrophic Cowardice’” audio, (8 March 2004), Democracy Now!. accessed 17 December 2006

26.                           ^ Vasagar, Jeevan (23 June 2006), “Redgrave centre stage in campaign to halt Romanian gold mine that has split village”, The Guardian. accessed 17 December 2006

27.                           ^ Moore, Matthew (20 December 2007). "Vanessa Redgrave bails Guantanamo suspect". The Daily Telegraph (London). http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/main.jhtml?xml=/news/2007/12/20/ngitmo420.xml. Retrieved 27 May 2010. 

28.                           ^ Gemma Arterton, Vanessa Redgrave to star in Williams' Song For Marion Screen Daily. 8 July 2011

External links

Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to: Vanessa Redgrave

Wikimedia Commons has media related to: Vanessa Redgrave

 

·                    Vanessa Redgrave at the Internet Broadway Database

·                    Vanessa Redgrave at the Internet Off-Broadway Database

·                    Vanessa Redgrave at the Internet Movie Database

·                    Vanessa Redgrave at the TCM Movie Database

·                    Vanessa Redgrave at the British Film Institute's Screenonline

·                    Vanessa Redgrave at Yahoo! Movies

·                    Vanessa Redgrave: Actress and Campaigner

·                    "She's Got Issues" – The Observer, 19 March 2006







 









Judi Dench, (636)
Oil on canvas
32 x 47 cm
 
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"Judi" Dench


From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia


Dench at the 2007 BAFTAs.

Born

Judith Olivia Dench
9 December 1934 (1934-12-09) (age 76)
[1][clarification needed]
York, England, United Kingdom

Occupation

Actress, author[2]

Years active

1957–present

Spouse

Michael Williams(1971–2001; widowed)

Children

Finty Williams

 

Dame Judith Olivia "Judi" Dench, CH, DBE, FRSA (born 9 December 1934) is an English film, stage and television actress.

Dench made her professional debut in 1957 with the Old Vic Company. Over the following few years she played in several of William Shakespeare's plays in such roles as Ophelia in Hamlet, Juliet in Romeo and Juliet and Lady Macbeth in Macbeth. She branched into film work, and won a BAFTA Award as Most Promising Newcomer; however, most of her work during this period was in theatre. Not generally known as a singer, she drew strong reviews for her leading role in the musical Cabaret in 1968.

 



HIDE TEXT


 

During the next two decades, she established herself as one of the most significant British theatre performers, working for the National Theatre Company and the Royal Shakespeare Company. In television, she achieved success during this period, in the series A Fine Romance from 1981 until 1984 and in 1992 began a continuing role in the television romantic comedy series As Time Goes By.

Her film appearances were infrequent until she was cast as M in GoldenEye (1995), a role she has played in each James Bond film since. She received several notable film awards for her role as Queen Victoria in Mrs. Brown (1997), and has since been acclaimed for her work in such films as Shakespeare in Love (1998), Chocolat (2000), Iris (2001), Mrs Henderson Presents (2005) and Notes on a Scandal (2006), and the television production The Last of the Blonde Bombshells (2001).

Regarded by critics as one of the greatest actresses of the post-war period, and frequently named as the leading British actress in polls, Dench has received many award nominations for her acting in theatre, film and television; her awards include ten BAFTAs, seven Laurence Olivier Awards, two Screen Actors Guild Awards, two Golden Globes, an Academy Award, and a Tony Award. In June 2011, she received a fellowship from the British Film Institute (BFI).[3]

She was married to actor Michael Williams from 1971 until his death in 2001. They are the parents of actress Finty Williams.

Personal life

Dench was born in Heworth, York, England, the daughter of Eleanora Olave (née Jones), a native of Dublin, and Reginald Arthur Dench, a doctor who met Judi's mother while studying medicine at Trinity College, Dublin.[4] Dench was raised a Methodist until, at age 13, she attended The Mount School, a Quaker Independent Secondary school in York,thus becoming a Quaker.[5][6] Her brothers, one of whom is actor Jeffery Dench, were born in Tyldesley, Lancashire.[5][6] Notable relatives also include her niece, Emma Dench, a Roman historian and professor previously at Birkbeck, University of London, and currently at Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts.[7]

In 1971, Dench married British actor Michael Williams and they had their only child, Tara Cressida Frances Williams, known professionally as Finty Williams, on 24 September 1972.

Dench and her husband starred together in several stage productions, and the Bob Larbey British television sitcom, A Fine Romance (1981–84). Michael Williams died from lung cancer in 2001, aged 65.

Career

In Britain, Dench has developed a reputation as one of the greatest actresses of the post-war period, primarily through her work in theatre, which has been her forte throughout her career. She has more than once been named number one in polls for Britain's best actress.[8][9]

Early years

Through her parents, Dench had regular contact with the theatre. Her father, a physician, was also the GP for the York Theatre, and her mother was its wardrobe mistress.[10] Actors often stayed in the Dench household. During these years, Judi was involved on a non-professional basis in the first three productions of the modern revival of the York Mystery Plays in the 1950s. In 1957, in one of the last productions in which she appeared during this period, she played the role of the Virgin Mary, performed on a fixed stage in the Museum Gardens.[11] Though she initially trained as a set designer, she became interested in drama school as her brother Jeff attended the Central School of Speech and Drama.[10] She applied and was accepted, where she was a classmate of Vanessa Redgrave, graduating with a first class degree in drama and four acting prizes, one being the Gold Medal as Outstanding Student.[10]

In September 1957, she made her first professional stage appearance with the Old Vic Company, at the Royal Court Theatre, Liverpool, as Ophelia in Hamlet, then her London debut in the same production at the Old Vic. She remained a member of the company for four seasons, 1957–1961, her roles including Katherine in Henry V in 1958 (which was also her New York debut), and as Juliet in Romeo and Juliet in October 1960, directed and designed by Franco Zeffirelli. During this period, she toured the United States and Canada, and appeared in Yugoslavia and at the Edinburgh Festival.

She joined the Royal Shakespeare Company in December 1961 playing Anya in The Cherry Orchard at the Aldwych Theatre in London, and made her Stratford-upon-Avon debut in April 1962 as Isabella in Measure for Measure. She subsequently spent seasons in repertory both with the Nottingham Playhouse from January 1963 (including a West African tour as Lady Macbeth for the British Council), and with the Oxford Playhouse Company from April 1964. That same year, she made her film debut in The Third Secret.

Prominence

In 1968, she was offered the role of Sally Bowles in the musical Cabaret. As Sheridan Morley later reported: "At first she thought they were joking. She had never done a musical and she has an unusual croaky voice which sounds as if she has a permanent cold. So frightened was she of singing in public that she auditioned from the wings, leaving the pianists alone on stage".[12] But when it opened at the Palace Theatre in February 1968, Frank Marcus, reviewing for Plays and Players, commented that: "She sings well. The title song in particular is projected with great feeling."

After a long run in Cabaret, she rejoined the RSC making numerous appearances with the company in Stratford and London for nearly twenty years, winning several best actress awards. Among her roles with the RSC, she was the Duchess in John Webster's The Duchess of Malfi in 1971. In the Stratford 1976 season, and then at the Aldwych in 1977, she gave two comedy performances, first in Trevor Nunn's musical staging of The Comedy of Errors as Adriana, then partnered with Donald Sinden as Beatrice and Benedick in John Barton's "British Raj" revival of Much Ado About Nothing. As Bernard Levin wrote in The Sunday Times: "...demonstrating once more that she is a comic actress of consummate skill, perhaps the very best we have."[13]

One of her most notable achievements with the RSC was her performance as Lady Macbeth in 1976. Nunn's acclaimed production of Macbeth was first staged with a minimalist design at The Other Place theatre in Stratford. Its small round stage focused attention on the psychological dynamics of the characters, and both Ian McKellen in the title role, and Dench, received exceptionally favourable notices. "If this is not great acting I don't know what is", wrote Michael Billington in The Guardian. "It will astonish me if the performance is matched by any in this actress's generation", commented J C Trewin in The Lady. The production transferred to London, opening at the Donmar Warehouse in September 1977, and was adapted for television, later released on VHS and DVD. Dench won the SWET Best Actress Award in 1977.

In 1989, she was cast as Pru Forrest, the long-time silent wife of Tom Forrest, in the BBC soap opera The Archers on its 10,000th edition.[14]

She had a romantic role in the BBC television film Langrishe, Go Down (1978), with Jeremy Irons and a screenplay by Harold Pinter from the Aidan Higgins novel, directed by David Jones, in which she played one of three spinster sisters living in a fading Irish mansion in the Waterford countryside.

Dench made her debut as a director in 1988 with the Renaissance Theatre Company's touring season, Renaissance Shakespeare on the Road, co-produced with the Birmingham Rep, and ending with a three month repertory programme at the Phoenix Theatre in London. Dench's contribution was a staging of Much Ado About Nothing, set in the Napoleonic era, which starred Kenneth Branagh and Samantha Bond as Benedick and Beatrice.

She has made numerous appearances in the West End including the role of Miss Trant in the 1974 musical version of The Good Companions at Her Majesty's Theatre. In 1981, Dench was due to play the title role of Grizabella in the original production of Cats, but was forced to pull out due to a torn Achilles tendon, leaving Elaine Paige to play the role.[15] She has acted with the National Theatre in London where, in September 1995, she played Desiree Armfeldt in a major revival of Stephen Sondheim's A Little Night Music, for which she won an Olivier Award.

Popular success

In 1995, she took over the role of M (James Bond's boss) with the James Bond film series, starting with GoldenEye replacing Robert Brown. She has appeared in six James Bond films, including Casino Royale (2006) and its direct sequel Quantum of Solace (2008), making her the longest-running current cast member of the series.

She has won multiple awards for performances on the London stage, including a record six Laurence Olivier Awards. She also won the Tony Award for her 1999 Broadway performance in the role of Esme Allen in David Hare's Amy's View. She has taken on the role of Director for a number of stage productions. Dench won the Academy Award for Best Supporting Actress as Elizabeth I in the film Shakespeare in Love.

Judi Dench has frequently appeared with her close friend Geoffrey Palmer. They co-starred in the series As Time Goes By, where she played Jean Pargetter, becoming Jean Hardcastle after she married Lionel Hardcastle. The program spanned nine seasons. They also worked together on the films Mrs. Brown and Tomorrow Never Dies, both filmed in 1997. Dench has also lent her distinctive voice to many animated characters, narrations, and various other voice work. She plays the role of "Miss Lilly" in the children's animated series Angelina Ballerina (alongside her daughter, Finty Williams, as the voice of Angelina) and as Mrs. Calloway in the Disney animated film Home on the Range. She has narrated various classical music recordings (notably Mendelssohn's A Midsummer Night's Dream, and Britten's Canticles-The Heart of the Matter), and has appeared in numerous BBC radio broadcasts as well as commercials. Her many television appearances include lead roles in the series A Fine Romance and As Time Goes By. In the United States, As Time Goes By has been repeated on PBS and on BBC America.

Recent years

Dench returned to the West End stage in April 2006 in Hay Fever alongside Peter Bowles, Belinda Lang and Kim Medcalf. She finished off 2006 with the role of Mistress Quickly in the RSC's new musical The Merry Wives, a version of The Merry Wives of Windsor.[16]

Dench's more recent film career has garnered six Academy Award nominations in nine years for Mrs. Brown in 1997; her Oscar-winning turn as Elizabeth I in Shakespeare in Love in 1998; for Chocolat in 2000; for the lead role of writer Iris Murdoch in Iris in 2001 (with Kate Winslet playing her as a younger woman); for Mrs Henderson Presents (a romanticised history of the Windmill Theatre) in 2005; and for 2006's Notes on a Scandal, a film for which she received critical acclaim, including Golden Globe, Academy Award, BAFTA and Screen Actors Guild nominations.

In 2007, the BBC issued The Judi Dench Collection, DVDs of eight television dramas: Talking to a Stranger quartet (1966), Keep an Eye on Amélie (1973), The Cherry Orchard (1981), Going Gently (1981), Ghosts (with Kenneth Branagh and Michael Gambon, 1987), Make and Break (with Robert Hardy, 1987), Can You Hear Me Thinking? (co-starring with her husband, Michael Williams, 1990) and Absolute Hell (1991).[17]

Dench, as Miss Matty Jenkins, co-starred with Eileen Atkins, Michael Gambon, Imelda Staunton and Francesca Annis, in the BBC One five-part series Cranford. The series began transmission in the UK in November 2007, and on the BBC's U.S. producing partner station WGBH (PBS Boston) in spring 2008.

Dench became the voice for the narration for the updated Walt Disney World Epcot attraction Spaceship Earth in February 2008.

In February 2008, she was named as the first official patron of the York Youth Mysteries 2008, a project to allow young people to explore the York Mystery Plays through dance, film-making and circus. This culminated on 21 June with a day of city centre performances in York.

She worked on the 22nd Bond adventure Quantum of Solace and reprised her role as M.

She is interested in horse racing and in partnership with her chauffeur Bryan Agar owns a four-year-old horse, "Smokey Oakey", who won the 2008 Brigadier Gerard Stakes.[18]

She returned to the West End from 13 March – 23 May 2009, playing Madame de Merteuil in Yukio Mishima's Madame De Sade, directed by Michael Grandage as part of the Donmar season at Wyndham's Theatre. A year later, Dench renewed her collaboration with Sir Peter Hall at the Rose Theatre in Kingston upon Thames in A Midsummer Night's Dream which opened in February 2010, when she played Titania as Elizabeth I of England in her later years: Queen of the Forest of Arden. On 31 July 2010, Dame Judi performed Send in the Clowns at a special celebratory Promenade Concert from The Royal Albert Hall as part of the Proms Season, in honour of composer Stephen Sondheim's 80th Birthday, the entire concert in honour of his music.[19][20]

Public life

Dench was appointed an Officer of the Order of the British Empire in 1970[21] and promoted to Dame Commander of the order in 1988.[22] She was appointed a Member of the Order of the Companions of Honour in 2005.[23] In June 2011, she became a fellow of the British Film Institute (BFI).[3]

Dench is a patron of The Leaveners, Friends School Saffron Walden and the Archway Theatre, Horley, UK. She became president of Mountview Academy of Theatre Arts in London in 2006,[24] taking over from Sir John Mills, and is also president of the Questors Theatre. In May 2006, she became an Honorary Fellow of the Royal Society of Arts. She is also patron of Ovingdean Hall School,[citation needed] a special day and boarding school for the deaf and hard of hearing in Brighton and Vice President of The Little Foundation.

Dench is an Honorary Fellow of Lucy Cavendish College, Cambridge. In 1996, she was awarded an Honorary Doctorate (D.Univ) from Surrey University[25] and in 2000-2001 she received an Honorary DLitt from Durham University.[26] In July 2000, she was awarded a Doctor of Letters (D.Litt) by Queen Margaret University, Edinburgh, where she actively supported their Drama School at the Gateway Theatre on Elm Row.[citation needed] On 24 June 2008, she was honoured by the University of St Andrews, receiving the honorary degree of Doctor of Letters (D.Litt) at the university's graduation ceremony.[27]

Dench has worked with the non-governmental indigenous organisation, Survival International, campaigning in the defence of the tribal people, the Bushmen of Botswana and the Arhuaco of Colombia. She made a small supporting video saying the Bushmen are victims of tyranny, greed and racism.[28][29]

On 22 July 2010, Dench was awarded an honorary degree of Doctor of Letters (DLitt) by Nottingham Trent University.[30]

Dr Hadwen Trust announced on 15 January 2011 that Dench had become a Patron of the trust joining existing high profile personalities, Joanna Lumley and David Shepherd.[31]

Filmography

 

Year

Title

Role

Notes

1964

Third Secret, TheThe Third Secret

Miss Humphries

 

1965

Four in the Morning

Wife[32]

BAFTA Award for Most Promising Newcomer to Leading Film Roles

1965

Study in Terror, AA Study in Terror

Sally

 

1965

He Who Rides a Tiger

Joanne

 

1968

Midsummer Night's Dream, AA Midsummer Night's Dream

Titania

 

1973

Luther

Katherine

 

1974

Dead Cert

Laura Davidson

 

1978

Langrishe, Go Down

Imogen Langrishe

BBC television film

1985

Angelic Conversation, TheThe Angelic Conversation

Narrator

 

1985

Wetherby

Marcia Pilborough

Nominated — BAFTA Award for Best Actress in a Supporting Role

1985

Room with a View, AA Room with a View

Eleanor Lavish

BAFTA Award for Best Actress in a Supporting Role

1987

84 Charing Cross Road

Nora Doel

Nominated — BAFTA Award for Best Actress in a Supporting Role

1988

Handful of Dust, AA Handful of Dust

Mrs. Beaver

BAFTA Award for Best Actress in a Supporting Role

1989

Henry V

Mistress Quickly

 

1989

Behaving Badly

Bridget Mayor

Channel 4 television serial
Nominated —
British Academy Television Award for Best Actress

1995

Jack and Sarah

Margaret

 

1995

GoldenEye

M

 

1996

Hamlet

Hecuba

 

1997

Mrs. Brown

Queen Victoria

BAFTA Award for Best Actress in a Leading Role
BAFTA Scotland Award for Best Actress in a Film
Golden Globe Award for Best Actress – Motion Picture Drama
Chicago Film Critics Association Award for Best Actress
London Film Critics' Circle Award for British Actress of the Year
Online Film Critics Society Award for Best Actress
Satellite Award for Best Actress – Motion Picture Drama
Nominated —
Academy Award for Best Actress
Nominated —
Screen Actors Guild Award for Outstanding Performance by a Female Actor in a Leading Role

1997

Tomorrow Never Dies

M

 

1998

Shakespeare in Love

Queen Elizabeth

Academy Award for Best Supporting Actress
BAFTA Award for Best Actress in a Supporting Role
Kansas City Film Critics Circle Award for Best Supporting Actress
National Society of Film Critics Award for Best Supporting Actress
Nominated —
Chlotrudis Award for Best Supporting Actress
Nominated —
Golden Globe Award for Best Supporting Actress – Motion Picture
Nominated —
Screen Actors Guild Award for Outstanding Performance by a Female Actor in a Supporting Role

1999

Tea with Mussolini

Arabella

 

1999

World Is Not Enough, TheThe World Is Not Enough

M

 

2000

Into the Arms of Strangers: Stories of the Kindertransport

Narrator

Documentary

2000

Last of the Blonde Bombshells, TheThe Last of the Blonde Bombshells

Elizabeth

British Academy Television Award for Best Actress
Golden Globe Award for Best Actress – Miniseries or Television Film
Nominated —
Primetime Emmy Award for Outstanding Lead Actress – Miniseries or a Movie
Nominated —
Screen Actors Guild Award for Outstanding Performance by a Female Actor in a Miniseries or Television Movie

2000

Chocolat

Armande Voizin

Screen Actors Guild Award for Outstanding Performance by a Female Actor in a Supporting Role
Nominated —
Academy Award for Best Supporting Actress
Nominated —
BAFTA Award for Best Actress in a Supporting Role
Nominated —
Golden Globe Award for Best Supporting Actress – Motion Picture
Nominated —
Satellite Award for Best Supporting Actress – Motion Picture

2001

Iris

Iris Murdoch

BAFTA Award for Best Actress in a Leading Role
London Film Critics' Circle Award for British Actress of the Year
Nominated —
Academy Award for Best Actress
Nominated —
Golden Globe Award for Best Actress – Motion Picture Drama
Nominated —
Phoenix Film Critics Society Award for Best Actress
Nominated —
Screen Actors Guild Award for Outstanding Performance by a Female Actor in a Leading Role
Nominated —
Satellite Award for Best Actress – Motion Picture Drama

2001

Shipping News, TheThe Shipping News

Agnis Hamm

Nominated — BAFTA Award for Best Actress in a Supporting Role
Nominated —
Screen Actors Guild Award for Outstanding Performance by a Female Actor in a Supporting Role

2002

The Importance of Being Earnest

Lady Bracknell

 

2002

Die Another Day

M

 

2002–05

Angelina Ballerina

Miss Lilly

Voice role

2003

Bugs!

Narrator

Short subject

2004

Home on the Range

Mrs. Caloway

Voice role

2004

Chronicles of Riddick, TheThe Chronicles of Riddick

Aereon

 

2004

Ladies in Lavender

Ursula Widdington

 

2005

Pride & Prejudice

Lady Catherine de Bourgh

 

2005

Mrs Henderson Presents

Mrs. Laura Henderson

St. Louis Gateway Film Critics Association Award for Best Actress
Nominated —
Academy Award for Best Actress
Nominated —
BAFTA Award for Best Actress in a Leading Role
Nominated —
British Independent Film Award for Best Actress
Nominated —
Broadcast Film Critics Association Award for Best Actress
Nominated —
Golden Globe Award for Best Actress – Motion Picture Musical or Comedy
Nominated —
London Film Critics' Circle Award for British Actress of the Year
Nominated —
Screen Actors Guild Award for Outstanding Performance by a Female Actor in a Leading Role
Nominated —
Satellite Award for Best Actress – Motion Picture Musical or Comedy

2006

Magic Roundabout, TheThe Magic Roundabout

Narrator

 

2006

Casino Royale

M

Nominated — National Movie Award for Best Actress

2006

Notes on a Scandal

Barbara Covett

British Independent Film Award for Best Actress
Evening Standard British Film Award for Best Actress
Nominated —
Academy Award for Best Actress
Nominated —
BAFTA Award for Best Actress in a Leading Role
Nominated —
Broadcast Film Critics Association Award for Best Actress
Nominated —
Chicago Film Critics Association Award for Best Actress
Nominated —
Golden Globe Award for Best Actress – Motion Picture Drama
Nominated —
London Film Critics Circle Award for Best Actress
Nominated —
London Film Critics' Circle for British Actress of the Year
Nominated —
Online Film Critics Society Award for Best Actress
Nominated —
Screen Actors Guild Award for Outstanding Performance by a Female Actor in a Leading Role
Nominated —
Satellite Award for Best Actress – Motion Picture Drama

2007

Go Inside to Greet the Light

Narrator

 

2007, 2009

Cranford

Miss Matty

Nominated — British Academy Television Award for Best Actress
Nominated —
Golden Globe Award for Best Actress – Miniseries or Television Film
Nominated —
Primetime Emmy Award for Outstanding Lead Actress – Miniseries or a Movie
Satellite Award for Best Actress – Miniseries or Television Film

2008

Quantum of Solace

M

 

2009

Rage

Mona Carvell

 

2009

Nine

Liliane La Fleur

Satellite Award for Best Cast – Motion Picture
Nominated —
Broadcast Film Critics Association Award for Best Cast
Nominated —
Screen Actors Guild Award for Outstanding Performance by a Cast in a Motion Picture
Nominated —
Washington D.C. Area Film Critics Association Award for Best Ensemble

2011

Jane Eyre

Mrs. Fairfax

 

2011

Pirates of the Caribbean: On Stranger Tides

Noblewoman

Cameo

2011

My Week with Marilyn

Dame Sybil Thorndike

post-production

2011

J. Edgar

Anna Marie

post-production

2012

The Best Exotic Marigold Hotel

Evelyn

filming

2012

Bond 23

M

pre production






 









Helen Mirren, (635)
Oil on canvas
30 x 44 cm
 
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Helen Mirren

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia


Mirren at the Orange British Academy Film Awards in February 2007

Born

Helen Lydia Mironoff
26 July 1945 (1945-07-26) (age 66)
Chiswick, London, England

Occupation

Actor

Years active

1965–present

Spouse

Taylor Hackford
(1997–present)

Partner

Taylor Hackford
(1986–1997)

Website

Official site

Dame Helen Mirren, DBE (born 26 July 1945) is an English actor. She has won an Academy Award for Best Actress, four SAG Awards, four BAFTAs, three Golden Globes, four Emmy Awards, and two Cannes Film Festival Best Actress Awards.



HIDE TEXT

Early life and family

Mirren was born Helen Lydia Mironoff[1][2] in Queen Charlotte's Hospital, Chiswick, West London.[3] Her father, Vasiliy Petrovich Mironov (1913–1980), was of Russian origin, and her mother, Kitty (née Kathleen Alexandrina Eva Matilda Rogers; 1909–1996), was English.[4] Mirren's paternal grandfather, Colonel Pyotr Vasilievich Mironov, was in the Tsarist Army and fought in the 1904 Russo-Japanese War. He later became a diplomat, and was negotiating an arms deal in Britain, where he and his family were stranded during the Russian Revolution.[5] The former diplomat became a London cab driver to support his family.

His son, Helen Mirren's father, changed the family name to the Scottish-sounding Mirren in the 1950s and became known as Basil Mirren. He played the viola with the London Philharmonic before World War II, and later drove a cab and was a driving-test examiner, before becoming a civil servant with the Ministry of Transport. Mirren's mother was from West Ham, East London, and was the 13th of 14 children born to a butcher whose father had been the butcher to Queen Victoria.[4] Mirren considers her upbringing to have been "very anti-monarchist".[6]

The first house she remembers living in was in Westcliff-on-Sea, Essex, when she was two or three years old, after the birth of her younger brother, who was named Peter Basil after his grandfather and great-great-grandfather. Mirren was the second of three children, born two years after her older sister Katherine ("Kate"; born 1942). She later lived in Leigh-on-Sea.

Education

 

This biographical section of an article needs additional citations for verification. Please help by adding reliable sources. Contentious material about living persons that is unsourced or poorly sourced must be removed immediately, especially if potentially libelous or harmful. (March 2011)

Mirren attended St Bernard's High School for Girls in Southend-on-Sea, where she acted in school productions, and subsequently a teaching college, the New College of Speech and Drama in London, "housed within Anna Pavlova's old home, Ivy House" on the North End Road – which leads from Golders Green to Hampstead, N. London. At age eighteen, she auditioned for the National Youth Theatre and was accepted. By the time she was 20, she was Cleopatra in the NYT production of Antony and Cleopatra at the Old Vic, which led to her signing with the agent Al Parker.

Theatre

Early years

Her work for the NYT led to Mirren joining the Royal Shakespeare Company (RSC), playing Castiza in Trevor Nunn's 1966 staging of The Revenger's Tragedy, Diana in All's Well That Ends Well in 1967, Cressida in Troilus and Cressida and Phebe[7] in As You Like It in 1968, Julia in The Two Gentlemen of Verona in 1970, and Tatiana in Gorky's Enemies at the Aldwych and the title role in Miss Julie at The Other Place in 1971. She also appeared in four productions, directed by Braham Murray for Century Theatre at the University Theatre in Manchester between 1965 and 1967.[8]

In 1970, Director/producer John Goldschmidt made the documentary film Doing Her Own Thing about Mirren at the Royal Shakespeare Company. The film was made for ATV and shown on the ITV Network in the UK.[9]

In 1972–73, Mirren worked with Peter Brook's International Centre for Theatre Research, and joined the group's tour in North Africa and the US which created The Conference of the Birds. Returning to the RSC she played Lady Macbeth at Stratford in 1974 and at the Aldwych Theatre in 1975.

As reported by Sally Beauman in her 1982 history of the RSC, Mirren, while appearing in Nunn's Macbeth (1974) and in a highly publicised letter to The Guardian newspaper, attacked both the National Theatre and the RSC for their lavish production expenditure, declaring it "unnecessary and destructive to the art of the Theatre," and adding, "The realms of truth, emotion and imagination reached for in acting a great play have become more and more remote, often totally unreachable across an abyss of costume and technicalities..." There were no discernible repercussions for this rebuke of the RSC.[10]

West End and RSC

At the Royal Court in September 1975 she notably played rock star Maggie in Teeth 'n' Smiles, a musical play by David Hare, which was revived at Wyndham's Theatre in May 1976 winning her the Plays & Players Best Actress award, voted by the London critics.

From November 1975 Mirren played in West End repertory with the Lyric Theatre Company as Nina in The Seagull and Ella in Ben Travers' new farce The Bed Before Yesterday ("Mirren is stirringly voluptuous as the Harlowesque good-time girl": Michael Billington, The Guardian, 10 December 1975). At the RSC in Stratford in 1977, and at the Aldwych the following year, she played a steely Queen Margaret in Terry Hands' production of the three parts of Henry VI, while 1979 saw her 'bursting with grace' with an acclaimed performance as Isabella in Peter Gill's otherwise unexceptional production of Measure for Measure at Riverside Studios.

In 1981 she returned to the Royal Court for the London premiere of Brian Friel's Faith Healer. In the same year she also received acclaim for her performance in the title role of John Webster's The Duchess of Malfi, a production of Manchester's Royal Exchange Theatre which transferred to The Roundhouse in Chalk Farm, London. Reviewing her portrayal for The Sunday Telegraph, Francis King wrote: "Miss Mirren never leaves it in doubt that even in her absences, this ardent, beautiful woman is the most important character of the story."

Her performance as Moll Cutpurse in The Roaring Girl at the Royal Shakespeare Theatre in January 1983, and at the Barbican Theatre April 1983), "swaggered through the action with radiant singularity of purpose, filling in areas of light and shade that even Thomas Middleton and Thomas Dekker omitted." – Michael Coveney, Financial Times, April 1983.

After a relatively barren sojourn in the Hollywood Hills, she returned to England at the beginning of 1989 to co-star with Bob Peck at the Young Vic in the London premiere of the Arthur Miller double-bill, Two Way Mirror, performances which prompted Miller to remark: "What is so good about English actors is that they are not afraid of the open expression of large emotions" (interview by Sheridan Morley: The Times 11 January 1989). In Elegy for a Lady she played the svelte proprietress of a classy boutique, while as the blonde hooker in Some Kind of Love Story she was "clad in a Freudian slip and shifting easily from waif-like vulnerability to sexual aggression, giving the role a breathy Monroesque quality" (Michael Billington, The Guardian).

Stage career breakthrough

A stage career breakthrough came in 1994, in an Yvonne Arnaud Theatre production bound for the West End, when Bill Bryden cast her as Natalya Petrovna in Ivan Turgenev's A Month in the Country. Her co-stars were John Hurt as her aimless lover Rakitin and Joseph Fiennes in only his second professional stage appearance as the cocksure young tutor Belyaev. "Instead of a bored Natalya fretting the summer away in dull frocks, Mirren, dazzlingly gowned, is a woman almost wilfully allowing her heart's desire for her son's young tutor to rule her head and wreak domestic havoc....Creamy shoulders bared, she feels free to launch into a gloriously enchanted, dreamily comic self-confession of love." (John Thaxter, Richmond & Twickenham Times, 4 March 1994).

Mirren was twice nominated for Broadway's Tony Award as Best Actress (Play): in 1995 for A Month in the Country, now directed by Scott Ellis ("Miss Mirren's performance is bigger and more animated than the one she gave last year in an entirely different London production", Vincent Canby in the NY Times, 26 April 1995). Then again in 2002 for August Strindberg's Dance of Death, co-starring with Sir Ian McKellen, their fraught rehearsal period coinciding with the terrorist attacks on New York on September 11, 2001 (as recorded in her In the Frame autobiography, September 2007).

National Theatre

Mirren had an unhappy experience at the National Theatre in 1998 when she played Cleopatra to Alan Rickman's Antony. In 2000 Nicholas Hytner, who had worked with Mirren on the film version of The Madness of King George, cast her as Lady Torrance in his revival of Tennessee Williams' Orpheus Descending at the Donmar Warehouse in London. Michael Billington, reviewing for The Guardian, described her performance as "an exemplary study of an immigrant woman who has acquired a patina of resilient toughness but who slowly acknowledges her sensuality."

At the National Theatre in November 2003 she again won praise playing Christine Mannon ("defiantly cool, camp and skittish", Evening Standard; "glows with mature sexual allure", Daily Telegraph) in a revival of Eugene O'Neill's Mourning Becomes Electra directed by Howard Davies.

“This production was one of the best experiences of my professional life, The play was four and a half hours long, and I have never known that kind of response from an audience ... It was the serendipity of a beautifully cast play, with great design and direction, It will be hard to be in anything better.” (In the Frame, September 2007).

She played the tragic title role in Jean Racine's Phèdre at the National in 2009, in a production directed by Nicholas Hytner. The production was also staged at the amphitheater of Epidaurus on 11 and 12 July 2009.

Selected stage credits

·                    Cleopatra, Anthony and Cleopatra, Old Vic Theatre, London, 1965

·                    Cathleen, Long Day's Journey Into Night, Century Theatre, Manchester,England 1965

·                    Kitty, Charley's Aunt, Century Theatre, Manchester, 1967

·                    Nerissa, The Merchant of Venice, Century Theatre,Manchester, 1967

·                    Castiza, The Revenger's Tragedy, Royal Shakespeare Company, Stratford-upon-Avon, England, 1967

·                    Diana, All's Well That Ends Well, Royal Shakespeare Company, Stratford-upon-Avon, 1967

·                    Cressida, Troilus and Cressida, Royal Shakespeare Company, Aldwych Theatre, London, 1968

·                    Hero, Much Ado about Nothing, Aldwych Theatre, 1968–1969

·                    Win-the-Fight Littlewit, Bartholomew Fair, Aldwych Theatre, 1969

·                    Lady Anne, Richard III, Royal Shakespeare Company, Stratford-upon-Avon, 1970

·                    Ophelia, Hamlet, Royal Shakespeare Company, Stratford-upon-Avon, 1970

·                    Julia, The Two Gentlemen of Verona, Royal Shakespeare Company, Stratford-upon-Avon, 1970

·                    Tatyana, Enemies, Royal Shakespeare Company, Aldwych Theatre, 1971

·                    Harriet, The Man of Mode, Royal Shakespeare Company, Aldwych Theatre, 1971

·                    Title role, Miss Julie, Royal Shakespeare Company, Aldwych Theatre, 1971

·                    Elayne, The Balcony, Royal Shakespeare Company, Aldwych Theatre, 1971

·                    Isabella, Measure for Measure, Riverside Studios Theatre, London,1974

·                    Lady Macbeth, Macbeth, Royal Shakespeare Company, Stratford-upon-Avon, 1974, then Aldwych Theatre, 1975

·                    Maggie, Teeth 'n' Smiles, Royal Court Theatre, London, 1975, thenWyndham's Theatre, London, 1976

·                    Nina, The Seagull, Lyric Theatre, London, 1975

·                    Ella, The Bed before Yesterday, Lyric Theatre, 1975

·                    Queen Margaret, Henry VI, Parts I, II and III, Royal Shakespeare Company, Stratford-upon-Avon, 1977, then Aldwych Theatre, 1978

·                    Title role, The Duchess of Malfi, Royal Exchange Theatre, Manchester, England, 1980, then Mound House Theatre, London, 1981

·                    Grace, Faith Healer, Royal Court Theatre, 1981

·                    Cleopatra, Antony and Cleopatra, Pit Theatre, London, 1983

·                    Moll Cutpurse, The Roaring Girl, Barbican Theatre, London, 1983

·                    Marjorie, Extremities, Duchess Theatre, London, 1984

·                    Madame Bovary, 1987

·                    Angela, "Some Kind of Love Story," and dying woman, "Elegy for a Lady," in Two-Way Mirror (double-bill), Young Vic Theatre, *London, 1989

·                    Sex Please We're Italian, 1991

·                    Natalya Petrovna, A Month in the Country, London, 1994, then Criterion Theatre, New York City, 1995

·                    Antony and Cleopatra, Royal National Theatre, London, 1998

·                    Collected Stories, London, 1999

·                    Lady Torrance, Orpheus Descending, Donmar Warehouse, London, 2000

·                    Alice, Dance of Death, Broadhurst Theatre, New York City, 2001–2002

·                    Mourning Becomes Electra, Lyttelton Stage, Royal National Theatre, 2003

·                    Phedre, National Theatre, 2009

·                    Also appeared as Susie Monmican, The Silver Lassie; in Woman in Mind, Los Angeles.

Film

 

Mirren at the 2010 Comic Con in San Diego, July 22, 2010

Mirren has also appeared in a large number of films throughout her career. Some of her earlier film roles include Age of Consent, O Lucky Man!, Caligula, Excalibur, 2010, The Long Good Friday, White Nights, When the Whales Came and The Mosquito Coast. After those appearances she received roles in Belfast-born director Terry George's film Some Mother's Son, which was about the 1981 Hunger Strikes in Northern Ireland, opposite Irish actress Fionnula Flanagan, Painted Lady, The Prince of Egypt and The Madness of King George. One of her other film roles was in Peter Greenaway's The Cook, The Thief, His Wife and Her Lover, as the eponymous thief's wife, opposite Michael Gambon. Her favourite film is Teaching Mrs. Tingle, in which she plays sadistic History teacher, Mrs Eve Tingle.[citation needed]

Mirren continued her successful film career when she starred more recently in Gosford Park with Maggie Smith and Calendar Girls where she starred with Julie Walters. Other more recent appearances include The Clearing, Pride, Raising Helen, and Shadowboxer. Mirren also provided the voice for the supercomputer "Deep Thought" in the film adaptation of Douglas Adams' The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy. During her career, she has portrayed three British queens in different films and television series: Elizabeth I in the television series Elizabeth I (2005), Elizabeth II in The Queen (2006), and Queen Charlotte, the wife of George III, in The Madness of King George (1994). She is the only actress ever to have portrayed both Queens Elizabeth on the screen.

Mirren's title role of The Queen earned her numerous acting awards including a BAFTA, a Golden Globe, and an Academy Award, among many others. During her acceptance speech at the Academy Award ceremony, she praised and thanked Elizabeth II and stated that she had maintained her dignity and weathered many storms during her reign as Queen. Mirren later appeared in supporting roles in the films National Treasure 2: Book of Secrets, Inkheart, State of Play, and The Last Station, for which she was nominated for an Oscar.[11]

In preparation for her role as a retired Israeli Mossad agent in the film The Debt, Mirren reportedly immersed herself in studies of Hebrew language, Jewish history, and Holocaust writing, including the life of Simon Wiesenthal, while in Israel in 2009 for the filming of some of the movie's scenes. The film is a remake of a 2007 Israeli film of the same name (Hebrew: Ha-khov).[12]

Television

Mirren is well-known for her role as detective Jane Tennison in the widely viewed Prime Suspect, a multiple award-winning television drama that was noted for its high quality, higher popularity and its unique format, in that it ran for seven seasons in seven extended multi-act episodes rather than in a traditional seasonal schedule. Her portrayal of Tennison won her three consecutive BAFTA awards for Best Actress between 1992 and 1994.

Some of Mirren's other television performances include Cousin Bette (1971); As You Like It (1979); Blue Remembered Hills (1979); The Twilight Zone episode "Dead Woman's Shoes" (1985); Losing Chase (1996); The Passion of Ayn Rand (1999), where her performance won her both the Emmy and the Golden Globe; Door to Door (2002); and The Roman Spring of Mrs. Stone (2003). In 1976, she appeared with Laurence Olivier, Alan Bates and Malcolm McDowell in a production of Harold Pinter's The Collection as part of the Laurence Olivier Presents series. She also played Elizabeth I in 2005, in the television serial Elizabeth I, for Channel 4 and HBO, for which she received an Emmy Award. Mirren won another Emmy Award on 16 September 2007 for her role in Prime Suspect: The Final Act on PBS in the same category as in 2006.

Mirren hosted Saturday Night Live on 9 April 2011.[13]

Awards and recognition

Main article: List of awards and nominations received by Helen Mirren

Film awards

 

Mirren at the 83rd Academy Awards in 2011.

In 1984, Mirren won Best Actress for her role in the film Cal at the Cannes Film Festival and the 1985 Evening Standard British Film Awards. In 1994 and 2001, she was nominated for the Best Supporting Actress Academy Award for her roles in The Madness of King George and Gosford Park, respectively. In 1995, she had also been awarded for Best Actress once again in Cannes for playing Queen Charlotte in The Madness of King George.[14] In 2002, she received the SAG Award for Best Supporting Actress in a Motion Picture for Gosford Park. Mirren is the first female actress to be nominated for three acting performances at the Golden Globe Awards in the same year. She won the Golden Globe for Best Actress in a Leading Role in the movie drama category for Stephen Frears' The Queen in 2006 (along with two nominations in the Actress in a Mini-series or TV Movie category for Elizabeth I, and Prime Suspect: Final Act). She won both Golden Globes for The Queen and Elizabeth I and also won two SAG awards the same year for the same roles. Mirren is the third actor to win two Golden Globes in the same year, and the first ever to win for both leading roles in TV and film in the same year. She is one of only three actresses (the first was Liza Minnelli in 1973 and then decades later Helen Hunt) to win a Golden Globe, an Oscar and an Emmy for performances given in the same year.

Along with the Golden Globe, Mirren's acclaimed performance in The Queen won her the 2007 Academy Award for Best Actress.[15] She also received Best Actress awards from the Venice Film Festival, Broadcast Film Critics, National Board of Review, Satellite Awards, Screen Actors Guild and a BAFTA, as well as critics awards from all over the world. Entertainment Weekly recently ranked her Number 2 for Entertainer of the Year for 2006 and also won the award for best actress in film at the new Greatest Britons Awards for her role in The Queen. In 2007 Mirren became an Honorary Patron of the University Philosophical Society at Trinity College Dublin.

She won the Best Actress award at the 2009 Rome International Film Festival for her performance as Tolstoy's wife in The Last Station.[16]

Academy Award Nominations

·                    Best Actress

o                               2006 – The Queen

o                               2009 – The Last Station

·                    Best Supporting Actress

o                               1994 – The Madness of King George

o                               2001 – Gosford Park

Television awards

Mirren won a Golden Globe for Best Actress in a Leading Role in a Mini-series or TV Movie in 1997 for her role in Losing Chase. She received two nominations in the Actress in a Mini-series or TV Movie category for Elizabeth I, and Prime Suspect: The Final Act, where she only won the Golden Globe for her title role performance in Elizabeth I. In that same year she won an SAG award for that same role. Mirren also won an Emmy for her role in Elizabeth I in category Lead Actress in a Mini-Series or a Movie in 2006. She had previously won an Emmy twice before, in that same category, in 1996 for her role in Prime Suspect: Scent of Darkness and in 1999 for The Passion of Ayn Rand.[17]

At the end of a triumphant year of awards for her acclaimed movie performance as Queen Elizabeth II in The Queen, Dame Helen also collected a 2007 Emmy Television award as Best Actress in a Mini-Series for her performance as Detective Superintendent Jane Tennison in Prime Suspect: The Final Act. She now has four Emmy awards. This seventh and apparently concluding instalment of the Prime Suspect saga portrayed Tennison as an alcoholic destined for retirement, and was screened in the US on the public service network PBS.

Emmy Awards

Awards won are indicated by bold lettering.

·                    Outstanding Lead Actress in a Miniseries or Movie

·                    1993 – Prime Suspect 2

·                    1994 – Prime Suspect 3

·                    1996 – Prime Suspect 4: "Scent of Darkness"

·                    1997 – Prime Suspect 5: Errors of Judgment

·                    1999 – The Passion of Ayn Rand

·                    2003 – The Roman Spring of Mrs. Stone

·                    2004 – Prime Suspect 6: The Last Witness

·                    2006 – Elizabeth I

·                    2007 – Prime Suspect: The Final Act

·                    Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Miniseries or Movie

·                    2003 – Door to Door

Critics' Circle Award for Distinguished Service to the Arts

 

Mirren at The Critics' Circle Awards Luncheon in April 2007

Each year since 1988 The Critics' Circle has presented an award for Distinguished Service to the Arts, voted for by all members of the Circle, embracing Dance, Drama, Film, Music, Visual Arts and Architecture. At a celebratory luncheon on 10 April 2007 in the National Theatre's Terrace Restaurant, the award for 2006 was presented to Dame Helen Mirren.[18] As David Gritten, chairman of the Film section made clear, the decision to make the award was voted on in November 2006, well in advance of the awards hubbub that surrounded her performance in The Queen. Accepting the award, an engraved crystal rose bowl, Mirren described it as the most useful she has ever received, while reflecting poignantly that this now "might be the last award I will win in my life. It has been a most incredible year. You do the work and then....." Previous recipients include Peter Hall (1988), Judi Dench (1997) and Ian McKellen (2003).

Dame Commander of the Order of the British Empire

On 5 December 2003, she was invested as a Dame Commander of the Order of the British Empire (DBE). When she received the honour, Mirren commented that Prince Charles was "very graceful" but forgot to give her half of the award; another person had to remind him to give Mirren the star. She also said that she felt wary about accepting the award and had to be persuaded by fellow comrades to accept the DBE. In 1996 she had declined appointment as a Commander of the order (CBE).[19]

Personal life

Mirren married American director Taylor Hackford (her partner since 1986) on 31 December 1997, his 53rd birthday. The ceremony took place at the Ardersier Parish Church near Inverness in the Scottish Highlands.[20] The couple had met on the set of White Nights. It is her first marriage, and his third (he has two children from his previous marriages). Mirren has no children and says she has "no maternal instinct whatsoever."[21]

In the August 2011 issue of Esquire magazine, Mirren said, "I am quite spiritual. I believed in fairies when I was a child. I still do sort of believe in the fairies. And the leprechauns. But I don't believe in God."[22]

Mirren's autobiography, In the Frame: My Life in Words and Pictures, was published in the UK by Weidenfeld and Nicolson in September 2007. Reviewing for The Stage, John Thaxter wrote: "Sumptuously illustrated, at first sight it looks like another of those photo albums of the stars. But between the pictures there are almost 200 pages of densely printed text, an unusually frank story of her private and professional life, mainly in the theatre, the words clearly Mirren's own, delivered with forthright candour."[23]

In 1990, Mirren stated in an interview that she is an atheist.[24]

In a GQ interview in 2008, Mirren stated she had been date raped as a student and had often taken cocaine at parties during the 1980s.[25][26] She stopped using the drug after reading that Klaus Barbie made a living from cocaine dealing.[25][26][27][28]

On 11 May 2010, Mirren attended the unveiling of her waxwork at Madame Tussauds London. The figure reportedly cost £150,000 to make and took four months to complete.[29]

References in pop culture

·                    The Mars Volta on their 2008 album The Bedlam in Goliath have a song called "Ilyena" that is named after Mirren.[30] Mars Volta lyricist/singer Cedric Bixler-Zavala has stated an affinity for Mirren.[31]

Filmography

Film and television credits

Year

Title

Role

Notes

1967

Herostratus

 

 

1968

Midsummer Night's Dream, AA Midsummer Night's Dream

Hermia

 

1969

Red Hot Shot

 

 

1969

Age of Consent

Cora Ryan

 

1972

Miss Julie

Miss Julie

 

1972

Savage Messiah

Gosh Boyle

 

1973

O Lucky Man!

Patricia

 

1975

Caesar and Claretta

Claretta Petacci

 

1976

Hamlet

Ophelia/Gertrude

 

1979

Quiz Kid, TheThe Quiz Kid

Joanne

 

1979

Caligula

Caesonia

 

1980

Hussy

Beaty

 

1980

Fiendish Plot of Dr. Fu Manchu, TheThe Fiendish Plot of Dr. Fu Manchu

Alice Rage

 

1980

Long Good Friday, TheThe Long Good Friday

Victoria

 

1981

Excalibur

Morgana

 

1984

Cal

Marcella

 

1984

2010: The Year We Make Contact

Tanya Kirbuk

 

1984

Faerie Tale Theatre: "The Little Mermaid"

Princess Amelia

TV series: 1 episode

1985

Heavenly Pursuits

Ruth Chancellor

 

1985

Coming Through

Frieda von Richtofen Weekley

 

1985

White Nights

Galina Ivanova

 

1986

Mosquito Coast, TheThe Mosquito Coast

Mother Fox

 

1988

Pascali's Island

Lydia Neuman

 

1989

When the Whales Came

Clemmie Jenkins

 

1989

Cook, the Thief, His Wife & Her Lover, TheThe Cook, the Thief, His Wife & Her Lover

Georgina Spica

 

1990

Bethune: The Making of a Hero

Frances Penny Bethune

 

1990

Comfort of Strangers, TheThe Comfort of Strangers

Caroline

 

1991

Prime Suspect

Jane Tennison

TV series

1991

Where Angels Fear to Tread

Lilia Herriton

 

1993

Hawk, TheThe Hawk

Annie Marsh

 

1993

Royal Deceit

Geruth

 

1994

Madness of King George, TheThe Madness of King George

Queen Charlotte

 

1995

Snow Queen, TheThe Snow Queen

Snow Queen

(voice)

1996

Some Mother's Son

Kathleen Quigley

Also Associate Producer

1992

Losing Chase

Chase Phillips

TV

1997

Critical Care

Stella

 

1998

Sidoglio Smithee

 

 

1998

Prince of Egypt, TheThe Prince of Egypt

The Queen

(voice)

1999

Passion of Ayn Rand, TheThe Passion of Ayn Rand

Ayn Rand

 

1999

Teaching Mrs. Tingle

Mrs. Eve Tingle

 

2000

Greenfingers

Georgina Woodhouse

 

2001

Pledge, TheThe Pledge

Doctor

 

2001

No Such Thing

The Boss

 

2001

Happy Birthday

Distinguished Woman

Also Director

2001

Last Orders

Amy

 

2001

Gosford Park

Mrs. Wilson

 

2003

Roman Spring of Mrs. Stone, TheThe Roman Spring of Mrs. Stone

Karen Stone

TV

2003

Calendar Girls

Chris Harper

 

2004

Clearing, TheThe Clearing

Eileen Hayes

 

2004

Raising Helen

Dominique

 

2005

Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy, TheThe Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy

Deep Thought

(voice)

2005

Elizabeth I

Queen Elizabeth I

 

2005

Shadowboxer

Rose

 

2006

Queen, TheThe Queen

Queen Elizabeth II

 

2007

National Treasure: Book of Secrets

Emily Appleton

 

2008

Inkheart

Elinor Loredan

 

2009

State of Play

Cameron Lynne

 

2009

Last Station, TheThe Last Station

Sofya Tolstoy

 

2010

Love Ranch

Grace Bontempo

 

2010

Tempest, TheThe Tempest

Prospera

 

2010

Brighton Rock

Ida

 

2010

RED

Victoria

 

2010

Legend of the Guardians: The Owls of Ga'Hoole

Nyra

(voice)

2011

Arthur

Lillian Hobson

 

2011

Debt, TheThe Debt

Rachel Singer

 

Further reading

·                    Command Performance, a profile of Helen Mirren written by John Lahr in The New Yorker magazine, 2 October 2006

·                    In the Frame: My Life in Words and Pictures (autobiography) by Helen Mirren, Weidenfeld and Nicholson, 2007 ISBN 978-0-297-85197-4.

o                               Rather than writing an autobiography Helen Mirren was commissioned by Alan Samson at Orion Books to write about her life in a series of chapters based on pictures from her extensive personal collection of photography and memorabilia. Edited by Chris Worwood, with whom she worked on the Award-winning HBO series Elizabeth, the book covers every aspect of her life from her aristocratic Russian heritage to her days with Peter Hall's RSC company to her Academy Award for The Queen.

References

1.                               ^ Lahr, John (2 October 2006). "COMMAND PERFORMANCE". The New Yorker. http://www.newyorker.com/archive/2006/10/02/061002fa_fact1. Retrieved 24 October 2010. 

2.                               ^ Births, Marriages & Deaths Index of England & Wales, 1916–2005.; at ancestry.com

3.                               ^ According to her 2007 memoirs "the fastest birth on record at that time. I wonder if anyone has broken it yet?"

4.                               ^ a b Helen Mirren

5.                               ^ Col. Pyotr Mironov biodata

6.                               ^ E! Online (entertainment web-site)

7.                               ^ Helen Mirren – Biography Retrieved: 13 April 2010.

8.                               ^ Murray, Braham "The Worst It Can Be Is A Disaster", A & C Black,2007, ISBN 978-0713484902

9.                               ^ Doing Her Own Thing (TV 1970), imdb page

10.                           ^ The Royal Shakespeare Company: A History of Ten Decades by Sally Beauman, (Oxford 1982)

11.                           ^ Nominees & Winners for the 82nd Academy Awards

12.                           ^ ContactMusic.com.

13.                           ^ EW review

14.                           ^ "Festival de Cannes: The Madness of King George". festival-cannes.com. http://www.festival-cannes.com/en/archives/ficheFilm/id/3373/year/1995.html. Retrieved 5 September 2009. 

15.                           ^ "Dame Helen crowned Queen", The Sun Online. Retrieved on 26 February 2007.

16.                           ^ Rome International Film Festival

17.                           ^ "64th Golden Globe Awards Nominations". Hollywood Foreign Press Association. Archived from the original on 8 January 2007. http://web.archive.org/web/20070108110307/http://www.hfpa.org/news/id/42. Retrieved 14 December 2006. 

18.                           ^ Critics' Award for Mirren, British Theatre Guide

19.                           ^ Helen Mirren declines CBE, The Times

20.                           ^ Helen Mirren and Taylor Hackford Marriage Profile

21.                           ^ Contact Music accessed 4 March 2007

22.                           ^ Cal Fussman, "Helen Mirren: What I've Learned," http://www.esquire.com/features/what-ive-learned/helen-mirren-quotes-0811

23.                           ^ Book review: The Stage newspaper, 1 November 2007

24.                           ^ "Sometimes I feel like a farmer during a war, someone who doesn't know very much about it and carries on digging, hoping for rain. But just the last few days I've had this terrible feeling of... doom. It's a, er, biblical, kind of Old Testament feeling. I'm an atheist, but I was suddenly thinking of those stories of the flood and punishment. Because we've become unbelievably greedy and destructive." Helen Mirren interviewed by Simon Garfield, The Independent (London), 25 November 1990, The Sunday Review Pages, Pg 27.

25.                           ^ a b "Dame Helen Mirren in date-rape revelation". CNN. 1 September 2008. http://www.cnn.com/2008/SHOWBIZ/09/01/helen.mirren.rape/index.html. Retrieved 1 September 2008. 

26.                           ^ a b Taylor, Jerome (1 September 2008). "Mirren talks of her date-rapes, then provokes furore with views on sex attackers". London: The Independent. http://www.independent.co.uk/news/uk/home-news/mirren-talks-of-her-daterapes-then-provokes-furore-with-views-on-sex-attackers-914596.html. Retrieved 1 September 2008. 

27.                           ^ 01/Sep/08 Dame Helen in cocaine admission BBC.co.uk

28.                           ^ 31/Aug/2008 The Queen actress Dame Helen Mirren reveals former love of cocaine Telegraph.co.uk

29.                           ^ "Helen Mirren unveils her waxwork at Madame Tussauds". Daily Mail. 12 May 2010. http://www.dailymail.co.uk/tvshowbiz/article-1277202/Helen-Mirren-unveils-waxwork-model-Madame-Tussauds.html. Retrieved 30 July 2010. 

30.                           ^ Hyland, David (31 January 2008). CD Review: Mars Volta's 'Bedlam' Brilliantly Assaults Ears, Minds. WBAL-TV. http://www.wbaltv.com/soundbytes/15169749/detail.html. Retrieved 6 March 2008 

31.                           ^ Miller, Doug (30 December 2007). Six questions with Mars Volta’s Bixler-Zavala. MSNBC. http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/22304053/. Retrieved 6 March 2008 

External links

Wikimedia Commons has media related to: Helen Mirren

·                    Official website

·                    Helen Mirren at the Internet Movie Database

·                    Helen Mirren at the TCM Movie Database

·                    Helen Mirren at the Internet Broadway Database

·                    Helen Mirren at the MBC Encyclopedia of Television

·                    Helen Mirren Biography at Tiscali

·                    The Helen Mirren Appreciation Society, official fan club

·                    Helen Mirren on Charlie Rose

·                    Works by or about Helen Mirren in libraries (WorldCat catalog)

·                    Helen Mirren collected news and commentary at The Guardian

·                    Helen Mirren collected news and commentary at The New York Times

·                    Arifa Akbar, "Helen Mirren: The good, the bad and The Queen", (interview), The Independent (London), 27 May 2007

·                    Kevin Maher, Dame Helen Mirren: I'm an Essex Girl (interview), The Times (London), 12 February 2010

·                    Morley Safer profile of Helen Mirren on CBS 60 Minutes, 7 January 2007







 










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LINKS TO PAGES IN    Painting 2nd part /

Famous people part 1

   
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Quick links to each celebrity portraits
 



 

MAIN LINKS IN www.joeltoft.se

 

Page 1                  
 
    Paintings 2nd part  
Compositions, People
Faces, People
Inspired by masters
Famous people part 2
Famous people part 1 (Faces)
Quick links to each painting ...
 
    Paintings 1st part   
Introduktion
Full body, People
Half body, People
Faces, People
Landscape part 3
Landscape part 2
Landscape part 1
Figures
Easy to interpret
Difficult to interpret part 4
Difficult to interpret part 3
Difficult to interpret part 2
Difficult to interpret part 1
Environment in cities
Lists of paintings  
 
    Photo Musicians
Blue Fire Blouse Band
    2018-05-12
Oscar Fredriks Chamber Choir
    2018-03-17
Voiceroom  2017-12-12
Restaurant Safir  2017-12-09
 
   Photo Nature
Part 3  2019-
Part 2  2017-08 and 2018-12
Part 1  2017-04
 
Sculptures                
Exhibition                 
List of publications
Text attachments