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Page 14. (In Famous people part 1)  December 2011

Ron Howard Stellan Skarsgård


John Cleese
Paul Newman






 









Ron Howard, (641, cropped)
Oil on canvas
35 x 49 cm
 
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Ron Howard

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
 

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/3/3f/Ron_Howard_2011_Shankbone_3.JPG/220px-Ron_Howard_2011_Shankbone_3.JPG
Howard at the 2011
Tribeca Film Festival Vanity Fair party

Born

Ronald William Howard
March 1, 1954 (1954-03-01) (age 57)
Duncan, Oklahoma, U.S.

Occupation

Actor, producer, director

Years active

1956–present

Spouse

Cheryl Alley (1975–present)

Children

Bryce Dallas Howard (b. 1981)
Jocelyn (b. 1985)
Paige (b. 1985)
Reed (b. 1987)

Ronald William "Ron" Howard (born March 1, 1954) is an American actor, director, and producer. He came to prominence as a child actor, playing Opie Taylor in the sitcom The Andy Griffith Show for eight years, and later the teenaged Richie Cunningham in the sitcom Happy Days for six years. He appeared in the films American Graffiti in 1973 and The Shootist in 1976, the latter during his run on Happy Days. He made his directorial debut with the 1977 comedy Grand Theft Auto. He left Happy Days in 1980 to focus on directing; his films include the Academy Award-winning Cocoon, Apollo 13, and A Beautiful Mind. In 2003, he was awarded the National Medal of Arts.[1] Asteroid 12561 Howard is named for him.



HIDE TEXT


 

Early life

Howard was born in Duncan, Oklahoma, the son of Jean Speegle Howard, an actress, and Rance Howard, a director, writer and actor,[2] who was serving three years in the United States Air Force at the time.[3][4] The family moved to Hollywood in 1958, the year before the birth of his younger brother, Clint Howard. They rented a house on the block south of the Desilu Studios, where The Andy Griffith Show would later be filmed. They lived in Hollywood for at least three years, before moving to Burbank.

Ron was tutored at Desilu Studios in his younger years. He graduated from John Burroughs High School. He later attended the University of Southern California's School of Cinematic Arts but did not graduate.[5]

Career

Early acting roles and The Andy Griffith Show

In 1959, Howard had his first credited film role in The Journey. He appeared in June Allyson's CBS anthology series The DuPont Show with June Allyson in the episode "Child Lost"; in the The Twilight Zone episode "Walking Distance"; a few episodes of the first season of the sitcom Dennis the Menace as Stewart, one of Dennis's friends; and in the 24th episode of The Many Loves of Dobie Gillis. Ron Howard played "Timmy" (uncredited) in "Counterfeit Gun", Season 5, Episode 2 (1960) of the TV series, "The Cheyenne Show".

In 1960, Howard was cast as Opie Taylor in The Andy Griffith Show, a spin-off of The Danny Thomas Show. Credited as "Ronny Howard," he portrayed the son of the title character (played by Andy Griffith) for all eight seasons of the show. Howard also spent a lot of time with Griffith off-screen.

In the 1962 film version of "The Music Man," Howard played Winthrop Paroo, the child with the lisp; the film starred Robert Preston and Shirley Jones. He also starred in the 1963 film The Courtship of Eddie's Father with Glenn Ford.

Billed as "Ronny Howard", he appeared as Barry Stewart on The Eleventh Hour in the episode "Is Mr. Martian Coming Back?" in 1965; on I Spy in the episode "Little Boy Lost" in 1966; and as an underage Marine on M*A*S*H in the episode "Sometimes You Hear the Bullet" in 1973. In the 1970s he appeared in at least one episode of The Bold Ones as a teenage tennis player with an illness.

Howard appeared on the 1969 Disneyland Records album The Story and Song from the Haunted Mansion. It featured the story of two teenagers, Mike (Howard) and Karen (Robie Lester), who get trapped inside the Haunted Mansion. Thurl Ravenscroft plays the Narrator, Pete Reneday plays the Ghost Host, and Eleanor Audley plays Madame Leota. Some of the effects and ideas that were planned but never permanently made it to the attraction are mentioned here: the Raven speaks in the Stretching Room, and the Hatbox Ghost is mentioned during the Attic scene. It was reissued in 1998 as a cassette tape titled A Spooky Night in Disney's Haunted Mansion.

Film roles and Happy Days

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/3/33/Ron_Howard_Cannes.jpg/220px-Ron_Howard_Cannes.jpg

http://bits.wikimedia.org/skins-1.18/common/images/magnify-clip.png

Ron Howard at the 1990 Cannes Film Festival.

Howard played Steve Bolander in George Lucas's coming-of-age film American Graffiti in 1973. When asked in 2000 if he would ever like to return to acting, Howard replied, "Only if I can act with Cindy Williams again", referring to the actress who played opposite him in American Graffiti.

A role in an installment of series Love, American Style titled "Love in The Happy Days" led to him being cast as Richie Cunningham in the TV series Happy Days. Beginning in 1974, he played the likeable "buttoned-down" boy, in contrast to Henry Winkler's "greaser" Arthur "Fonzie" Fonzarelli. On the Happy Days set, he developed an on- and off-screen chemistry with series leads Winkler and Tom Bosley, as they each developed their own private lives. The three remained friends until Bosley's death in 2010.

In 1976, Howard was cast as Gillom Rogers in the movie The Shootist with John Wayne. He had hopes they would work together again; he quotes Wayne as saying, about a couple of months after filming wrapped on The Shootist, "I found a good script, kid... it's you and me, or it's nobody." But it was not to be, as Wayne had already been diagnosed with the terminal cancer that would kill him three years later. As a token of respect, Howard narrates the film's opening montage, which shows various clips from Wayne's long film career.

His last significant on-screen role was a reprisal of his famous role as Opie Taylor in the 1986 TV movie Return to Mayberry, an Andy Griffith Show reunion reuniting him with Griffith, Don Knotts, and most of the cast. He also appeared in two Happy Days TV reunions: 1992's The Happy Days Reunion Special, a retrospective hosted by Winkler that aired on ABC; and 2005's The Happy Days 30th Anniversary Reunion, where he was reunited with most of the surviving cast.

Directing

Before leaving Happy Days in 1980, Howard made his directing debut with the 1977 low-budget comedy/action film Grand Theft Auto. This came after cutting a deal with Roger Corman to star in Eat My Dust with Christopher Norris. Howard went on to direct several TV movies. His big theatrical break came in 1982 with Night Shift featuring Michael Keaton, Shelley Long, and Winkler.

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/3/3d/Ron_Howard.jpg/170px-Ron_Howard.jpg

http://bits.wikimedia.org/skins-1.18/common/images/magnify-clip.png

Howard in 2008 during the filming of Angels & Demons in Rome.

He has since directed a number of high-visibility films, including Splash, Parenthood, Cocoon, Willow, Backdraft, Apollo 13, A Beautiful Mind (for which he won the Academy Award for Best Director), Cinderella Man, The Da Vinci Code and Angels & Demons.

Howard's younger brother Clint has minor roles in most of his movies. He has also cast his father and mother in a number of roles. Both his wife Cheryl Howard and father Rance Howard appeared in Angels & Demons as a CERN scientist and as Cardinal Beck, respectively.[6]

Howard showcased the world premiere of his film Frost/Nixon at the 2008 London Film Festival in October 2008.[7]

Ron Howard was the recipient of the Austin Film Festival's 2009 Extraordinary Contribution to Filmmaking Award. Michael Keaton presented him with the Award.

Imagine Entertainment

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/6/6c/Ron_Howard_Brian_Grazer_2011_Shankbone.JPG/220px-Ron_Howard_Brian_Grazer_2011_Shankbone.JPG

http://bits.wikimedia.org/skins-1.18/common/images/magnify-clip.png

Howard and Brian Grazer at a Tribeca Film Festival panel on A Beautiful Mind

Howard is the co-chairman, with Brian Grazer, of Imagine Entertainment, a major[citation needed] film and television production company. Imagine has produced several films including Friday Night Lights, 8 Mile, and Inside Deep Throat, and the television series 24, Felicity and Arrested Development. Howard also narrated Arrested Development.

Personal life

On June 7, 1975, Howard wed his high-school sweetheart, Cheryl (née Alley), a writer with a degree in geriatric psychology. They have four children: daughters Bryce Dallas Howard (b. 2 March 1981), Jocelyn Carlyle Howard and Paige Carlyle Howard (twins, b. 1985); and son Reed Cross Howard (b. 1987). His daughters' middle names indicate where they were conceived, Bryce in Dallas, Texas, and twins Jocelyn and Paige at the Carlyle Hotel in New York City. Son Reed Cross was named after a London street because "Volvo isn't a very good middle name", according to Howard.[8] Daughters Bryce and Paige are actresses. The family lives on a 35-acre (14 ha) estate in the gated community of Conyers Farm in Greenwich, Connecticut.[9][10][11] In February 2007, Howard became a grandfather when his daughter, Bryce, gave birth to a son, Theodore Norman Howard Gabel.

In the June 2006 issue of Vanity Fair magazine, Howard was asked, "What do you consider your greatest achievement?" He replied, "Forty-eight consecutive years of steady employment in television and film, while preserving a rich family life."

Howard in popular culture

Howard appeared as himself twice in The Simpsons. In "When You Dish Upon a Star", Homer meets and befriends Alec Baldwin, Kim Basinger and Howard. Later in the episode, Howard is injured when trying to jump from a truck to the RV that Homer was driving. In the end, he pitches Homer's movie idea and gets it greenlit. Another episode ("Hello Gutter, Hello Fadder") Homer and Howard are fighting each other while appearing on The Springfield Squares. Later, Howard gives Homer the inspiration to spend more time with his kids and offers him some money that Homer refuses at first but then takes. Howard yanks the money back and drives away.

When he hosted Saturday Night Live in the 1980s, Eddie Murphy called him "Opie Cunningham".

In the South Park episode "Ginger Kids", Cartman asks a crowd of fellow gingers to name great Americans with red hair, the only name they can think of is "Ron Howard". When asked to name a second, one responds "Ron Howard" again.

On a VH1 special about the 100 greatest child stars, many of the interviewees considered Ron Howard to be the most successful child star of all time, considering his two major television acting roles and his directing career.[citation needed]

In the series finale of the Emmy Award-winning, critically acclaimed series Arrested Development (which he executive produced and narrated), Howard appears as himself in an epilogue at the end of the episode and refers to himself as "a Hollywood icon".

In Season 1, Episode 3 of Stroker and Hoop on Adult Swim, Stroker and Hoop run a detective agency whose first client needs them to make Ron Howard stop controlling his mind.

In October 2008, Howard reprised his roles as Opie Taylor and Richie Cunningham for the first time in over 20 years when he appeared in a video on funnyordie.com in which he endorsed Barack Obama and urged people to vote. The video, titled "Ron Howard’s Call to Action",[12] also features Griffith and Winkler. In the video, Howard shaves his beard and wears a wig in order to recreate the way he looked when he was younger.

Ron Howard made a cameo appearance in the 2009 music video for Jamie Foxx's song "Blame It" alongside Forrest Whittaker, Jake Gyllenhaal, and Samuel L. Jackson. In the video he is shown holding a glass of champagne.[13]

 

Filmography

Films

Year

Title

Notes

1969

Old Paint

Short film

Deed of Daring-Do

Short film

Cards, Cads, Guns, Gore and Death

Short film

1977

Grand Theft Auto

Also writer

1982

Night Shift

 

1984

Splash

 

1985

Cocoon

 

1986

Gung Ho

Also executive producer

1988

Willow

 

1989

Parenthood

Also writer

1991

Backdraft

 

1992

Far and Away

Also writer/producer

1994

The Paper

 

1995

Apollo 13

 

1996

Ransom

 

1999

EDtv

Also producer

2000

How the Grinch Stole Christmas

Also producer

2001

A Beautiful Mind

Academy Award for Best Director

Also producer

2003

The Missing

Also producer

2005

Cinderella Man

Also producer

2006

The Da Vinci Code

Also producer

2008

Frost/Nixon

Academy Award nomination for Best Director

Also producer

2009

Angels & Demons

Also producer

2011

The Dilemma

Also producer

Television

Year

Film

Notes

1978

Cotton Candy

Writer/Director

1980

Skyward

Director/Executive producer

1981

Through the Magic Pyramid

Director/Executive producer

1983

Littleshots

Director

1987

Take Five

Director/Executive producer

1988

Poison

Executive Producer

1998

Sports Night

Executive producer

1999

The PJs

Executive producer only

2003

Arrested Development

Executive producer/Narrator

2010

Parenthood

Executive producer only

Acting

Film

 

Year

Film

Role

Notes

1959

The Journey

Billy Rhinelander

as Ronny Howard

1961

"Five Minutes To Live" (re-released as Door-to-Door Maniac and "Five Minutes To Live")

Bobby

as Ronnie Howard

1962

The Music Man

Winthrop Paroo

as Ronny Howard

1963

The Courtship of Eddie's Father

Eddie

as Ronny Howard

1965

Village of the Giants

Genius

as Ronny Howard

1970

The Wild Country

Virgil

as Ronny Howard

1973

American Graffiti

Steve Bolander

as Ronny Howard

Happy Mother's Day, Love George

Johnny

 

1974

The Spikes Gang

Les Richter

 

1975

Huckleberry Finn

Huckleberry Finn

 

1976

The First Nudie Musical

Auditioning actor

uncredited

Eat My Dust

Hoover Niebold

 

The Shootist

Gillom Rogers

Nominated—Golden Globe Award for Best Supporting Actor – Motion Picture

1977

Grand Theft Auto

Sam Freeman

 

1979

More American Graffiti

Steve Bolander

 

1982

Night Shift

Annoying Sax Player/Boy Making out with Girlfriend in Front of Chuck's Apartment

uncredited

1992

The Magical World of Chuck Jones

Himself

documentary

1998

One Vision

Himself

documentary

Welcome to Hollywood

Himself

 

2000

The Independent

Himself

 

How the Grinch Stole Christmas

Whoville Townsperson

uncredited

2001

Osmosis Jones

Tom Colonic

(voice)

A Beautiful Mind

Man at Governor's Ball

uncredited

2004

Tell Them Who You Are

Himself

documentary

2007

In the Shadow of the Moon

Himself

documentary

Television

Year

Title

Role

Notes

1959

Johnny Ringo

Ricky Parrot

1 episode

The Twilight Zone

The Wilcox Boy

Episode "Walking Distance"

1959–1960

The June Allyson Show

Wim

"Child Lost"
(as Ronny Howard)

Dennis the Menace

Stewart

5 episodes, 1959–1960

1959–1961

The Many Loves of Dobie Gillis

various roles

4 episodes
(as Ronny Howard)

General Electric Theater

various roles

2 episodes

1960

Make Room for Daddy

Opie Taylor

"Danny Meets Andy Griffith"

Cheyenne

Timmy

"Counterfeit Gun"
uncredited

Pete and Gladys

Tommy

"The Goat Story"

1960–1968

The Andy Griffith Show

Opie Taylor

209 episodes
(as Ronny Howard)

1962

Route 66

Chet

"Poor Little Kangaroo Rat"
(as Ronny Howard)

The New Breed

Tommy Simms

"So Dark the Night"

1963

The Eleventh Hour

Barry Stewart

"Is Mr. Martian Coming Back?"
(as Ronny Howard)

1964

The Great Adventure

Daniel Waterhouse

"Plague"
(as Ronny Howard)

Dr. Kildare

Jerry Prentice

"A Candle in the Window"
(as Ronny Howard)

The Fugitive

Gus

"Cry Uncle"

1965

The Big Valley

Tommy

"Night of the Wolf"
(as Ronny Howard)

1966

Gomer Pyle, U.S.M.C.

Opie Taylor

"Opie Joins the Marines"
(as Ronny Howard)

1966

I Spy

Alan Loden

"Little Boy Lost"

1967

The Monroes

Timothy Prescott

"Teaching the Tiger to Purr"
(as Ronny Howard)

Gentle Ben

Jody Cutler

"Green-Eyed Bear"
(as Ronny Howard)

A Boy Called Nuthin

Richie `Nuthin'´ Caldwell

(as Ronny Howard)

1968

Mayberry R.F.D.

Opie Taylor

"Andy and Helen Get Married"
(as Ronny Howard)

The F.B.I.

Jess Orkin

"The Runaways"
(as Ronny Howard)

1969

Judd for the Defense

Phil Beeton

"Between the Dark and the Daylight"
(as Ronny Howard)

Daniel Boone

Luke

"A Man Before His Time"
(as Ronny Howard)

1968–1969

Lancer

Various roles

2 episodes
(as Ronny Howard)

1969

Gunsmoke

Jamie

"Charlie Noon"
(as Ronny Howard)

Land of the Giants

Jodar

"Genus At Work"
(as Ronny Howard)

1970

Smoke

Chris

(as Ronny Howard)

The Headmaster

Tony Landis

"Will the Real Mother of Tony Landis Please Stand Up?"

Lassie

Gary

"Gary Here Comes Glory!" Part 1 & 2
(as Ronny Howard)

1971–1972

The Smith Family

Bob Smith

39 episodes

1972

Love, American Style

Richard 'Richie' Cunningham

"Love and the Happy Days"

The Bold Ones: The New Doctors

Cory Merlino

"Discovery at Fourteen"
(as Ronny Howard)

Bonanza

Ted Hoag

"The Initiation"
(as Ronny Howard)

1973

M*A*S*H

Private Walter/ Wendell Peterson

"Sometimes You Hear the Bullet"
(as Ronny Howard)

1974

The Waltons

Seth Turner

"The Gift"

The Migrants

Lyle Barlow

 

Locusts

Donny Fletcher

 

1974–1984

Happy Days

Richard 'Richie' Cunningham

171 episodes
Golden Globe Award for Best Performance by an Actor In A Television Series - Musical Or Comedy

1975

Huckleberry Finn

Huckleberry Finn

 

1976

I'm a Fool

Andy

 

1976–1979

Laverne & Shirley

Richard 'Richie' Cunningham

2 episodes

1980

Act of Love

Leon Cybulkowski

 

The Fonz and the Happy Days Gang

Richard 'Richie' Cunningham

(voice)
"King for a Day"

1981

Bitter Harvest

Ned De Vries

 

Fire on the Mountain

Lee Mackie

 

1983

When Your Lover Leaves

 

(uncredited)

1986

Return to Mayberry

Opie Taylor

 

1998 and 1999

The Simpsons

Himself

voice

1999

Frasier

Stephen

voice
"Good Samaritan"

2003–2006

Arrested Development

Narrator, self

(uncredited)

References

 

1.      ^ Lifetime Honors – National Medal of Arts

2.      ^ "Ron Howard Biography (1954–)". Filmreference.com. http://www.filmreference.com/film/42/
Ron-Howard.html.
 Retrieved 2010-03-05. 

3.      ^ Gray, Beverly (2003). Ron Howard: from Mayberry to the moon-- and beyond. Nashville,
 TN: Rutledge Hill Press. pp. 7–8.
 ISBN 1-55853-970-0. http://books.google.com/books?id=ziz6zQ73yx0C&pg=PA8&lpg=PA8&dq=rance+howard+air+
force&source=bl&ots=Dt9pfLKb
_G&sig=EmiTueq_zTJ
kG3xDxhP2PBCjwgw&hl=en&ei=nXPETc
ydAuXr0QHCg_T_Bw&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=1&ved=0CBkQ6AEwAA
#v=onepage&q=rance%20ho
ward%20air%20force&f=false

4.      ^ Estrin, Eric (22 Feb 2010). "Ron Howard's 'Breakthrough'?: Ronald Reagan". The Wrap. http://www.thewrap.com/movies/column-post/ron-howards-breakthrough-ronald-reagan-14504. Retrieved 6 May 2011. 

5.      ^ Notable Alumni, USC School of Cinematic Arts.

6.      ^ "Angels & Demons IMDb credits". imdb.com. http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0808151/fullcredits#cast. Retrieved 2010-08-27. 

7.      ^ "London Film Festival". Spoonfed.co.uk. 2008-09-24. http://www.spoonfed.co.uk/spooners/willbingley-2741/the-times-bfi-52nd-london-film-festival-big-hitters-491/. Retrieved 2010-03-05. 

8.      ^ Biography for Ron Howard at the Internet Movie Database

9.      ^ Cowan, Alison Leigh (2006-03-13). "Land of the Big Puts 'Too Big' To the Test".
 New York Times. http://query.nytimes.com/gst/fullpage.html?res=9D07E7DB1031F930A25750C0A9609C8B63. Retrieved 2009-02-20. 

10.  ^ Dumas, Timothy (1998). Greentown: murder and mystery in Greenwich, America's wealthiest community. Arcade Publishing. p. 187. ISBN 1559704411

11.  ^ Clemence, Sarah (2005-11-18). "Most Expensive Gated Communities 2005". Forbes. http://www.forbes.com/2005/11/17/expensive-gated-communities-cx_sc_1118home_ls.html.
 Retrieved 2009-08-20. 

12.  ^ "Ron Howard’s Call to Action"

13.  ^ Jamie Foxx featuring T-Pain - Blame It ft. T-Pain on YouTube

External links

 







 









Stellan Skarsgård, (640, cropped)
Oil on canvas
31 x 53 cm
 
Top          Next          Other image size          Previous          Bottom








 

Stellan Skarsgård

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

 

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/1/1f/Stellan_Skarsg%C3%A5rd_2009.jpg/220px-Stellan_Skarsg%C3%A5rd_2009.jpg
Skarsgård in Kalmar, July 2009

Born

Stellan John Skarsgård
13 June 1951 (1951-06-13) (age 60)
Gothenburg, Sweden

Occupation

Actor

Years active

1968–present

Stellan John Skarsgård (Swedish pronunciation: [ˈstɛlː.ˈan ˈskɒːʂɡoːɖ] (http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/2/21/Speaker_Icon.svg/13px-Speaker_Icon.svg.png listen); born 13 June 1951) is a Swedish actor, known internationally for his film roles in Angels & Demons, Breaking the Waves, The Hunt for Red October, Ronin, Good Will Hunting, Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Man's Chest, Pirates of the Caribbean: At World's End, Dominion: Prequel to the Exorcist, Mamma Mia!, Thor and King Arthur.



HIDE TEXT


 

Early life

Skarsgård was born in Gothenburg, Sweden; the son of Gudrun (née Larsson) and Jan Skarsgård.[1][2] He moved often in his childhood and lived, amongst other places, in Helsingborg, Totebo, Kalmar, Marielund and Uppsala.[3]

Acting career

 

Skarsgård started his acting career early. At the age of 21 he already had a great deal of experience in film, TV and stage.[4] Most of his early roles were in Swedish TV (such as Bombi Bitt) and movies. Of Skarsgård’s Swedish film work, he is perhaps best known for his portrayal of Swedish diplomat Raoul Wallenberg, who worked to save Holocaust victims. The movie was filmed in Budapest, in the only Jewish ghetto to survive World War II.[5]

Skarsgård is particularly associated with director Lars von Trier. He appeared in four of the Danish auteur's features-- The Kingdom, Breaking the Waves, Dogville and Melancholia. His most personal working relationship, however, is with Norwegian director Hans Petter Moland. Relevant films here are Kjærlighetens kjøtere, Aberdeen and A Somewhat Gentle Man (2010). Skarsgård considers Moland a close friend. Before shooting their next project in 2009, he said of their relationship: "We're like an old married couple and I get separation anxiety."[6] Aside from these, his best-known Scandinavian work is probably his leading role in another Norwegian film as the guilt-ridden policeman Jonas Engström in the original Insomnia.

Skarsgård’s first American film was the 1984 movie Noon Wine directed by Michael Fields, in which Skarsgård played a mentally disturbed immigrant farmhand being chased by a bounty hunter. He played opposite Fred Ward, who portrayed the farmer.[5]

He was considered for the role of Oskar Schindler in Schindler's List. Skarsgård reported that people often mistook him for Liam Neeson who portrayed Schindler in the film. Skarsgård would in fact replace Neeson in Exorcist: The Beginning (2004). He had a guest stint on the HBO TV Series Entourage as Verner Vollstedt, the German director of the fictional film Smokejumpers who has a bias against the main character Vincent Chase, one of the stars of the film.

Skarsgård appeared in 2011's Thor as fictional character Erik Selvig.[7]

Personal life

With his first wife, My (married 1975–2007), he fathered six children, four of them actors: Alexander Skarsgård (born 1976), Gustaf Skarsgård (born 1980), Sam Skarsgård (born 1982), Bill Skarsgård (born 1990), model Eija Skarsgård (born 1992) and Valter Skarsgård (born 1995). He married Megan Everett in January 2009 and their son Ossian, was born on 26 April 2009.[8]

Actors Paul Bettany and Jennifer Connelly named their son Stellan as a tribute to Skarsgård.

Views on religion

Skarsgård was raised by humanist parents and had an atheist grandfather and a deeply religious grandmother. According to Skarsgård, this never led to any problems because of the family's mutual respect for each other's opinons.[9] After the 11 September attacks, Skarsgård set out to read the Bible and the Qur'an, both of which he condemns as violent.[9] Skarsgård is also a critic of religious independent schools in the Swedish educational system.[9] Skarsgård has said he considers the notion of God absurd and that if a real God were actually so vain as to constantly demand worship, then he would not be worth it.[9]

In 2009, Skarsgård, along with other non-religious artists, authors and entrepreneurs including Christer Sturmark, Björn Ulvaeus and Christer Fuglesang, wrote an article in Dagens Nyheter stressing the importance of secularity.[10] The group also criticized the UN for its stance on blasphemy laws.[10]

Filmography

This filmography is not full but rather a representative one.

Year

Film

Role

Notes

1968

Bombi Bitt och jag

Bombi Bitt

Bombi Bitt and Me, mini TV series

1972

Firmafesten

Peter

a.k.a. The Office Party

Strandhugg i somras

Erik

a.k.a. Raid in the Summer

Magnetisören

Soldier

TV

1973

Fem døgn i August

Christer

a.k.a. Five days in August

Bröllopet

Roffe Eriksson

a.k.a. The Wedding

1974

Anita – ur en tonårsflickas dagbok

Erik

a.k.a. Anita: Swedish Nymphet (Anita – From the Diary of a Teenage Girl)

The Intruders

Peter Delaney, their son

a.k.a. Fait acompli

1977

Tabu

Jan-Erik

a.k.a. Taboo

Hemåt i natten

Kurt Sjöberg

a.k.a. Homeward in the Night

1982

The Simple-Minded Murder

Sven

Den enfaldige mördaren

1983

P & B

Karl-Johan 'Charlie' Pettersson

 

1984

Åke och hans värld

Ebenholtz

a.k.a. Åke and His World

1985

Falsk som vatten

Stig

a.k.a. False as Water

Noon Wine

Olaf Helton

 

Pelle Svanslös i Amerikatt

Pelle Swanson, voice

a.k.a. Peter-No-Tail in Americat

1986

Ormens väg på hälleberget

Karl Orsa Markström

a.k.a. The Serpent's Way

1987

Jim & piraterna Blom

Gustav, Jim's Father

a.k.a. Jim and the Pirates

Hip hip hurra!

Sören Kröyer

a.k.a. Hip Hip Hurrah!

1988

The Unbearable Lightness of Being

The Engineer

 

Vargens tid

Peder Ulfstand

a.k.a. Arilds tid/Time of the Wolf

Friends

Matt

 

The Perfect Murder

Axel Svensson

 

1989

S/Y Glädjen

Klas Larsson

a.k.a. S/Y Joy

Täcknamn Coq Rouge

Carl Hamilton

a.k.a. Code Name Coq Rouge

Vildanden

Gregers Werle

a.k.a. The Wild Duck

Kvinnorna på taket

Willy

a.k.a. The Women on the Roof

Förhöret

Carl Hamilton

a.k.a. The interrogation

1990

The Hunt for Red October

Capt. Tupolev

 

God afton, Herr Wallenberg

Raoul Wallenberg

a.k.a. Good Evening, Mr. Wallenberg

1991

Oxen

Helge Roos

a.k.a. The Ox

1992

Den demokratiske terroristen

Carl Hamilton

a.k.a. The Democratic Terrorist

Wind

Joe Heiser

 

1993

Kådisbellan

Fritiof Schütt

a.k.a. Innocent Life

Sista dansen

Host in Norrköping

a.k.a. The Last Dance

1995

Jönssonligans största kupp

Herman Melvin

a.k.a. The Jönsson Gang's Greatest Robbery

Kjærlighetens kjøtere

Randbæk

a.k.a. Zero Kelvin

Hundarna i Riga

Magnus Björk

a.k.a. The Dogs of Riga/The Hounds of Riga

1996

Harry och Sonja

Harry Olsson

a.k.a. Harry and Sonja

Breaking the Waves

Jan Nyman

 

1997

Insomnia

Jonas Engström

 

My Son the Fanatic

Schitz

 

Amistad

Tappan

 

Good Will Hunting

Prof. Gerald Lambeau

 

Riget II

Swedish lawyer

TV miniseries

1998

Glasblåsarns barn

Albert

a.k.a. The Glass-blower's Children

Savior

Peter Dominic

 

Ronin

Gregor

 

1999

Deep Blue Sea

Jim Whitlock

 

2000

Harlan County War

Warren Jakopovich

 

Passion of Mind

William Granther

 

Signs & Wonders

Alec

 

Timecode

Alex Green

 

Dancer in the Dark

Doctor

 

Aberdeen

Tomas

 

The Hire: Powder Keg

Harvey Jacobs

 

Kiss Kiss (Bang Bang)

Felix

 

2001

Taking Sides

Dr. Wilhelm Furtwängler

 

The Glass House

Terrence 'Terry' Glass

 

2002

City of Ghosts

Joseph Kaspar

 

2003

No Good Deed

Tyrone Abernathy

 

Att döda ett barn

(voice) Narrator

a.k.a. To Kill a Child

Helen of Troy

Theseus

 

Dogville

Chuck

 

2004

King Arthur

Cerdic

 

Exorcist: The Beginning

Father Merrin

 

2005

Dominion: Prequel to the Exorcist

Father Lankester Merrin

 

Beowulf & Grendel

Hrothgar

 

Guilty Hearts

Stangl

 

2006

Kill Your Darlings

Erik's Father

 

Goya's Ghosts

Francisco Goya

 

Arn – The Knight Templar

Birger Brosa

 

Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Man's Chest

Bootstrap Bill Turner

 

2007

Pirates of the Caribbean: At World's End

Bootstrap Bill Turner

 

2008

WΔZ

Eddie Argo

 

God on Trial

Baumgarten

 

Arn – The Kingdom at Road's End

Birger Brosa

 

Entourage

Werner

(3 episodes)

Mamma Mia!

Bill Anderson

 

2009

Boogie Woogie

Bob Maccelstone

 

Angels & Demons

Commander Maximilian Richter

 

Frankie and Alice

Dr. Oz

 

Metropia

Ralph

 

2010

A Somewhat Gentle Man

Ulrik

En ganske snill mann (Norwegian) or Regnskap

The Galapagos Affair

Friedrich

 

Submission

Narrator (English version)

 

King of Devil's Island

Håkon

Kongen av Bastøy (Norwegian)

As If I Am Not There

Doctor

 

2011

Thor

Dr. Erik Selvig

 

Melancholia

Jack

 

The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo

Martin Vanger

post-production

2012

The Avengers

Dr. Erik Selvig

filming

Awards and nominations

Year

Award or nomination

Event

Category

Character

Film

1982

Won[11]

32nd Berlin International Film Festival

Silver Bear for Best Actor

Sven

Den Enfaldige Mördaren

2001

Nominated

European Film Academy

Best Actor

Wilhelm Furtwängler

Taking Sides

Nominated

European Film Academy

Best European Actor

Wilhelm Furtwängler

Taking Sides

References

1.      ^ "Stellan Skarsgaard Biography". Filmreference.com. http://www.filmreference.com/film/25/Stellan-Skarsgaard.html. Retrieved 2010-03-05. 

2.      ^ Thyselius, Erik; Göran Lindblad (1999). Vem är det?: Svensk biografisk handbok: Volume 44. Norstedt. pp. 1004. 

3.      ^ "Hollywood’s Lonely Hero". Stellanonline.com. http://www.stellanonline.com/pcafe1998.html. Retrieved 2010-03-05. 

4.      ^ "Stellan Skarsgard (Bootstrap Bill) Biography". Starsontop.com. 2007-01-13. http://starsontop.com/pirates/stellan_skarsgard.htm. Retrieved 2010-03-05. 

5.      ^ a b Gross, Larry. "Stellan Skarsgård". BOMB Magazine. Summer 1998. Retrieved 2011-08-03.

6.      ^ Stiller opp for Moland www.dagsavisen.no

7.      ^ Elisabeth Rappe (2009-10-05). "Stellan Skarsgard Joins 'Thor'". Cinematical. http://www.cinematical.com/2009/10/05/stellan-skarsgard-joins-thor/. Retrieved 2009-10-05. 

8.      ^ "Skarsgard welcomes lucky number seven". Wenn.com. http://www.wenn.com/archives/6151. Retrieved 2010-03-05. [dead link]

9.      ^ a b c d Stellan Skarsgård: Bibeln och Koranen får inte styra skolan expressen.se Retrieved:2010-02-26

10.  ^ a b ”Därför är det viktigt med ett sekulärt samhälle” dn.se Retrieved:2010-02-26

11.  ^ "Berlinale: 1982 Prize Winners". berlinale.de. http://www.berlinale.de/en/archiv/jahresarchive/1982/03_preistr_ger_1982/03_Preistraeger_1982.html. Retrieved 2010-11-11. 

External links







 










Paul Newman, (639, cropped)
Oil on canvas
34 x 50 cm

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Paul Newman

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

 

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/2/24/Paul-Newman-portrait.jpg/220px-Paul-Newman-portrait.jpg
Paul Newman in 1975

Born

Paul Leonard Newman
January 26, 1925(1925-01-26)
Shaker Heights, Ohio, U.S.

Died

September 26, 2008(2008-09-26) (aged 83)
Westport, Connecticut, U.S.

Cause of death

Lung cancer

Resting place

Westport, Connecticut

Residence

Westport, Connecticut

Nationality

American

Education

Shaker Heights High School

Alma mater

Kenyon College (B.A.),
Ohio University

Occupation

Actor, director, entrepreneur

Years active

1952–2008

Home town

Shaker Heights, Ohio

Net worth

$ 300 million as of 2011

Political party

Democrat

Religion

none

Spouse

Jackie Witte (m. 1949–1958) «start: (1949)–end+1: (1959)»"Marriage: Jackie Witte to Paul Newman" Location: (linkback://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Paul_Newman) (divorced)
Joanne Woodward (m. 1958–2008) «start: (1958)–end+1: (2009)»"Marriage: Joanne Woodward to Paul Newman" Location: (linkback://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Paul_Newman) (his death)

Children

Scott (1950-78) (deceased)
Susan (1953)
Stephanie
Nell (1959)
Melissa (1961)
Claire (1965)

Parents

Theresa (nee Fetzer or Fetsko),
Arthur Samuel Newman

Awards

Academy Award in 1986,
Academy of Motion Pictures Arts and Sciences,
Golden Globe Award,
BAFTA Award,
Screen Actors Guild Award,
Cannes Film Festival Award,
Emmy Award

Paul Leonard Newman (January 26, 1925 – September 26, 2008)[1] was an American actor, film director, entrepreneur, humanitarian, professional racing driver and auto racing enthusiast. He won numerous awards, including an Academy Award for best actor for his performance in the 1986 Martin Scorsese film The Color of Money and eight other nominations,[2] three Golden Globe Awards, a BAFTA Award, a Screen Actors Guild Award, a Cannes Film Festival Award, an Emmy award, and many honorary awards. He also won several national championships as a driver in Sports Car Club of America road racing, and his race teams won several championships in open wheel IndyCar racing.

Newman was a co-founder of Newman's Own, a food company from which Newman donated all post-tax profits and royalties to charity.[3] As of July 2011, these donations exceeded $300 million.[3]



HIDE TEXT


 

Early life

Newman was born in Shaker Heights, Ohio (a suburb of Cleveland). He was the son of Theresa (née Fetzer or Fetsko; Slovak: Terézia Fecková)[4][5] and Arthur Sigmund Newman, who ran a profitable sporting goods store.[6][7][8] His father was Jewish (Paul's paternal grandparents, Simon Newman and Hannah Cohn, were immigrants from Hungary and Poland).[9][7] His mother, who practiced Christian Science, was born to a Slovak Roman Catholic family at Homonna, Ptičie (formerly Pticsie) in the former Kingdom of Hungary, Austria–Hungary (now Humenné in Slovakia).[5][10] Newman had no religion as an adult, but described himself as a Jew, stating that "it's more of a challenge".[11] Newman's mother worked in his father's store, while raising Paul and his brother, Arthur, who later became a producer and production manager.[12]

Newman showed an early interest in the theater, which his mother encouraged. At the age of seven, he made his acting debut, playing the court jester in a school production of Robin Hood. Graduating from Shaker Heights High School in 1943, he briefly attended Ohio University in Athens, Ohio, where he was initiated into the Phi Kappa Tau fraternity.[12]

Military service

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Navy portrait of Newman

Newman served in the United States Navy in World War II in the Pacific theater.[12] Newman enrolled in the Navy V-12 program at Ohio University, hoping to be accepted for pilot training, but was dropped when it was discovered he was color blind.[12][13] He was sent instead to boot camp and then received further training as a radioman and gunner. Qualifying as a rear-seat radioman and gunner in torpedo bombers, in 1944, Aviation Radioman Third Class Newman was sent to Barber's Point, Hawaii. He was subsequently assigned to Pacific-based replacement torpedo squadrons (VT-98, VT-99, and VT-100). These torpedo squadrons were responsible primarily for training replacement pilots and combat air crewmen, placing particular importance on carrier landings.[13]

He later flew from aircraft carriers as a turret gunner in an Avenger torpedo bomber. As a radioman-gunner, he served aboard the USS Bunker Hill during the Battle of Okinawa in the spring of 1945. He was ordered to the ship with a draft of replacements shortly before the Okinawa campaign, but his life was spared because he was held back after his pilot developed an ear infection. The men who remained in his detail were killed in action.[14]

After the war, he completed his Bachelor of Arts degree in English and Speech at Kenyon College in Gambier, Ohio in 1949.[12][15] Newman later attended the Yale School of Drama for one year before moving to New York City to study under Lee Strasberg at the Actors Studio.[12]

Oscar Levant wrote that Newman initially was hesitant to leave New York for Hollywood: "Too close to the cake," he reported him saying, "Also, no place to study."[16]

Career

Early work and mainstream success

Newman arrived in New York City in 1951 with his first wife Jackie Witte, taking up residence in the St. George section of Staten Island.[17] He made his Broadway theater debut in the original production of William Inge's Picnic with Kim Stanley in 1953 and appeared in the original Broadway production of The Desperate Hours in 1955. In 1959, he was in the original Broadway production of Sweet Bird of Youth with Geraldine Page and three years later starred with Page in the film version.

During this time Newman started acting in television. He had his first credited TV or film appearance with a small but notable part in a 1952 episode of the science fiction TV series Tales of Tomorrow entitled "Ice from Space".[18] In the mid-1950s, he appeared twice on CBS's Appointment with Adventure anthology series.

In February 1954, Newman appeared in a screen test with James Dean, directed by Gjon Mili, for East of Eden (1955). Newman was testing for the role of Aron Trask, Dean for the role of Aron's fraternal twin brother Cal. Dean won his part, but Newman lost out to Richard Davalos. In the same year, Newman co-starred with Eva Marie Saint and Frank Sinatra in a live —and color —television broadcast of Our Town, a musical adaptation of Thornton Wilder's stage play. Newman was a last-minute replacement for James Dean.[19] In 2003, Newman acted in a remake of Our Town, this time in the role of the stage manager.

His first movie for Hollywood was The Silver Chalice (1954). The film was a box office failure and the actor would later acknowledge his disdain for it.[20] In 1956, Newman garnered much attention and acclaim with Somebody Up There Likes Me as boxer Rocky Graziano. By 1958, he was one of the hottest new stars in Hollywood. Later that year, he starred in Cat on a Hot Tin Roof (1958), opposite Elizabeth Taylor. The film was a box office smash and Newman garnered his first Academy Award nomination. Also in 1958, Newman starred in The Long, Hot Summer with Joanne Woodward, whom he met on the set. He won best actor at the 1958 Cannes Film Festival for this film.

Major films

Newman was one of the few actors who successfully made the transition from 1950s cinema to that of the 1960s and 1970s. His rebellious persona translated well to a subsequent generation. Newman starred in Exodus (1960), The Hustler (1961), Hud (1963), Harper (1966), Hombre (1967), Cool Hand Luke (1967), The Towering Inferno (1974), Slap Shot (1977), and The Verdict (1982). He teamed with fellow actor Robert Redford and director George Roy Hill for Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid (1969) and The Sting (1973).

He appeared with his wife, Joanne Woodward, in the feature films The Long, Hot Summer (1958), Rally 'Round the Flag, Boys!, (1958), From the Terrace (1960), Paris Blues (1961), A New Kind of Love (1963), Winning (1969), WUSA (1970), The Drowning Pool (1975), Harry & Son (1984), and Mr. and Mrs. Bridge (1990). They both also starred in the HBO miniseries Empire Falls, but did not have any scenes together.

In addition to starring in and directing Harry & Son, Newman also directed four feature films (in which he did not act) starring Woodward. They were Rachel, Rachel (1968), based on Margaret Laurence's A Jest of God, the screen version of the Pulitzer Prize-winning play The Effect of Gamma Rays on Man-in-the-Moon Marigolds (1972), the television screen version of the Pulitzer Prize-winning play The Shadow Box (1980), and a screen version of Tennessee Williams' The Glass Menagerie (1987).

Twenty-five years after The Hustler, Newman reprised his role of "Fast" Eddie Felson in the Martin Scorsese-directed The Color of Money (1986), for which he won the Academy Award for Best Actor. He told a television interviewer that winning an Oscar at the age of 62 deprived him of his fantasy of formally being presented with it in extreme old age.[citation needed]

Last works

In 2003, he appeared in a Broadway revival of Wilder's Our Town, receiving his first Tony Award nomination for his performance. PBS and the cable network Showtime aired a taping of the production, and Newman was nominated for an Emmy Award for Outstanding Lead Actor in a Miniseries or TV Movie.

His last screen appearance was as a conflicted mob boss in the 2002 film Road to Perdition opposite Tom Hanks, although he continued to provide voice work for films.

In 2005 at age 80, Newman was profiled alongside Robert Redford as part of the Sundance Channel's TV series Iconoclasts.[21]

In 2006, in keeping with his strong interest in car racing, he provided the voice of Doc Hudson, a retired anthropomorphic race car in Disney/Pixar's Cars - this was his final performance for a major feature film.

Similarly, he served as narrator for the 2007 film Dale, about the life of the legendary NASCAR driver Dale Earnhardt, which turned out to be Newman's final film performance in any form. Newman also provided the narration for the film documentary The Meerkats, which was released in 2008.

Retirement from acting

Newman announced that he would entirely retire from acting on May 25, 2007. He stated that he did not feel he could continue acting at the level he wanted to. "You start to lose your memory, you start to lose your confidence, you start to lose your invention. So I think that's pretty much a closed book for me."[22]

Philanthropy

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/3/36/Paul_Newman_in_Carnation%2C_Washington_June_2007_cropped.jpg/220px-Paul_Newman_in_Carnation%2C_Washington_June_2007_cropped.jpg

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Newman in 2007

With writer A.E. Hotchner, Newman founded Newman's Own, a line of food products, in 1982. The brand started with salad dressing, and has expanded to include pasta sauce, lemonade, popcorn, salsa, and wine, among other things. Newman established a policy that all proceeds, after taxes, would be donated to charity. As of 2010, the franchise has donated in excess of $300 million.[3] He co-wrote a memoir about the subject with Hotchner, Shameless Exploitation in Pursuit of the Common Good. Among other awards, Newman's Own co-sponsors the PEN/Newman's Own First Amendment Award, a $25,000 reward designed to recognize those who protect the First Amendment as it applies to the written word.[23]

One beneficiary of his philanthropy is the Hole in the Wall Gang Camp, a residential summer camp for seriously ill children, which is located in Ashford, Connecticut. Newman co-founded the camp in 1988; it was named after the gang in his film Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid (1969). Newman's college fraternity, Phi Kappa Tau, adopted Hole in the Wall as their "national philanthropy" in 1995. One camp has expanded to become several Hole in the Wall Camps in the U.S., Ireland, France, and Israel. The camps serve 13,000 children every year, free of charge.[3]

In June 1999, Newman donated $250,000 to Catholic Relief Services to aid refugees in Kosovo.[24]

On June 1, 2007, Kenyon College announced that Newman had donated $10 million to the school to establish a scholarship fund as part of the college's current $230 million fund-raising campaign. Newman and Woodward were honorary co-chairs of a previous campaign.[25]

Newman was one of the founders of the Committee Encouraging Corporate Philanthropy (CECP), a membership organization of CEOs and corporate chairpersons committed to raising the level and quality of global corporate philanthropy. Founded in 1999 by Newman and a few leading CEOs, CECP has grown to include more than 175 members and, through annual executive convenings, extensive benchmarking research, and best practice publications, leads the business community in developing sustainable and strategic community partnerships through philanthropy.[26]

Newman was named the Most Generous Celebrity of 2008 by Givingback.org. He contributed $20,857,000 for the year of 2008 to the Newman's Own Foundation, which distributes funds to a variety of charities.[27]

Upon Newman's death, the Italian newspaper (a "semi-official" paper of the Holy See) L'Osservatore Romano published a notice lauding Newman's philanthropy. It also commented that "Newman was a generous heart, an actor of a dignity and style rare in Hollywood quarters."[28]

Marriages and family

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Newman and his wife Joanne Woodward in 1960

Newman was married to Jackie Witte[12] from 1949 to 1958. They had a son, Scott (1950–1978), and two daughters, Susan Kendall (1953) and Stephanie .[12] Scott, who died in November 1978 from a drug overdose,[29] appeared in the films Breakheart Pass, The Towering Inferno, and the 1977 film Fraternity Row. Paul Newman started the Scott Newman Center for drug abuse prevention in memory of his son.[30] Susan is a documentary filmmaker and philanthropist and has Broadway and screen credits, including a starring role as one of four Beatles fans in I Wanna Hold Your Hand (1978), and also a small role opposite her father in Slap Shot. She also received an Emmy nomination as co-producer of his telefilm, The Shadow Box.

Newman met actress Joanne Woodward in 1953. Shortly after filming The Long, Hot Summer, in 1957 he divorced Witte. He married Woodward early in 1958. They remained married for fifty years until his death in 2008.[31] They had three daughters: Elinor "Nell" Teresa (b. 1959), Melissa "Lissy" Stewart (b. 1961), and Claire "Clea" Olivia (b. 1965). Newman directed Nell (using the stage name Nell Potts) alongside her mother in the films Rachel, Rachel and The Effect of Gamma Rays on Man-in-the-Moon Marigolds.

The Newmans lived away from the Hollywood environment, making their home in Westport, Connecticut. Newman was well known for his devotion to his wife and family. When asked once about infidelity, he famously quipped, "Why go out for a hamburger when you have steak at home?"[32]

Political activism

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Newman at a political rally for Eugene McCarthy in 1968

For his support of Eugene McCarthy in 1968 (and effective use of television commercials in California) and his opposition to the War in Vietnam, Newman was placed nineteenth on Richard Nixon's enemies list,[33] which Newman claimed was his greatest accomplishment.

Consistent with his work for liberal causes, Newman publicly supported Ned Lamont's candidacy in the 2006 Connecticut Democratic Primary against Senator Joe Lieberman, and was even rumored as a candidate himself, until Lamont emerged as a credible alternative. He donated to Chris Dodd's presidential campaign.[34]

He attended the first Earth Day event in Manhattan on April 22, 1970. Newman was also a vocal supporter of gay rights, including same-sex marriage.[35]

Newman was concerned over global warming and supported nuclear energy development as a solution.[36]

Auto racing

Newman was an avid auto racing enthusiast, and first became interested in motorsports ("the first thing that I ever found I had any grace in") while training at the Watkins Glen Racing School for the filming of Winning, a 1969 film. Because of his love and passion for racing, Newman agreed in 1971 to star in and to host his first television special, Once Upon a Wheel, on the history of auto racing. It was produced and directed by David Winters, who co-owned a number of racing cars with Newman.[37][38] Newman's first professional event as a racer was in 1972, in Thompson, Connecticut, and he was a frequent competitor in Sports Car Club of America (SCCA) events for the rest of the decade, eventually winning four national championships. He later drove in the 1979 24 Hours of Le Mans in Dick Barbour's Porsche 935 and finished in second place.[39] Newman reunited with Barbour in 2000 to compete in the Petit Le Mans.[40]

24 Hours of Le Mans career

Participating years

1979

Teams

Dick Barbour Racing

Best finish

2nd (1979)

Class wins

1 (1979)

From the mid-1970s to the early 1990s, he drove for the Bob Sharp Racing team, racing mainly Datsuns (later rebranded as Nissans) in the Trans-Am Series. He became closely associated with the brand during the 1980s, even appearing in commercials for them. At the age of 70 years and 8 days, he became the oldest driver to be part of a winning team in a major sanctioned race,[41] winning in his class at the 1995 24 Hours of Daytona.[42] Among his last races were the Baja 1000 in 2004 and the 24 Hours of Daytona once again in 2005.[43]

Newman initially owned his own racing team, which competed in the Can-Am series, but later co-founded Newman/Haas Racing with Carl Haas, a Champ Car team, in 1983. The 1996 racing season was chronicled in the IMAX film Super Speedway, which Newman narrated. He was also a partner in the Atlantic Championship team Newman Wachs Racing. Newman owned a NASCAR Winston Cup car, before selling it to Penske Racing, where it now serves as the #12 car.

Newman was posthumously inducted into the SCCA Hall of Fame at the national convention in Las Vegas, Nevada on February 21, 2009.[44]

Illness and death

Newman was scheduled to make his professional stage directing debut with the Westport Country Playhouse's 2008 production of John Steinbeck's Of Mice and Men, but he stepped down on May 23, 2008, citing health issues.[45]

In June 2008, it was widely reported that Newman, a former chain smoker, had been diagnosed with lung cancer and was receiving treatment at Sloan-Kettering hospital in New York City.[46] Photographs taken of Newman in May and June showed him looking gaunt.[citation needed] Writer A.E. Hotchner, who partnered with Newman to start the Newman's Own company in the 1980s, told the Associated Press that Newman told him about the disease about eighteen months prior to the interview.[47] Newman's spokesman told the press that the star was "doing nicely," but neither confirmed nor denied that he had cancer.[48] In August, after reportedly finishing chemotherapy, Newman told his family he wished to die at home.

Newman died on September 26, 2008, aged 83, surrounded by his family and close friends.[49][50] His remains were cremated after a private funeral service near his home in Westport.[51]

Filmography, awards, and nominations

Further information: List of awards and nominations received by Paul Newman

[edit] As actor

Year

Film

Role

Notes

1954

The Silver Chalice

Basil

 

1955

Producer's Showcase: Our Town

George Gibbs

 

1956

Somebody Up There Likes Me

Rocky Graziano

Cinema Writers Circle Award for Best Foreign Actor

The Rack

Capt. Edward W. Hall Jr.

 

1957

The Helen Morgan Story

Larry Maddux

 

Until They Sail

Capt. Jack Harding

 

1958

The Long, Hot Summer

Ben Quick

Best Actor Award (Cannes Film Festival)

The Left Handed Gun

Billy the Kid

 

Cat on a Hot Tin Roof

Brick Pollitt

Nominated — Academy Award for Best Actor
Nominated —
BAFTA Award for Best Actor in a Leading Role

Rally 'Round the Flag, Boys!

Harry Bannerman

 

1959

The Young Philadelphians

Anthony Judson Lawrence

 

1960

From the Terrace

David Alfred Eaton

 

Exodus

Ari Ben Canaan

 

1961

The Hustler

Eddie Felson

BAFTA Award for Best Actor in a Leading Role
Mar del Plata Film Festival Best Actor
Nominated —
Academy Award for Best Actor
Nominated —
Golden Globe Award for Best Actor - Motion Picture Drama

Paris Blues

Ram Bowen

 

1962

Sweet Bird of Youth

Chance Wayne

Nominated — Golden Globe Award for Best Actor - Motion Picture Drama

Hemingway's Adventures of a Young Man

Ad Francis, 'The Battler'

Nominated — Golden Globe Award for Best Supporting Actor - Motion Picture

1963

Hud

Hud Bannon

Nominated — Academy Award for Best Actor
Nominated —
BAFTA Award for Best Actor in a Leading Role
Nominated —
Golden Globe Award for Best Actor - Motion Picture Drama

A New Kind of Love

Steve Sherman

 

The Prize

Andrew Craig

 

1964

What a Way to Go!

Larry Flint

 

The Outrage

Juan Carrasco

 

1965

Lady L

Armand Denis

 

1966

Harper

Lew Harper

 

Torn Curtain

Prof. Michael Armstrong

directed by Alfred Hitchcock

1967

Hombre

John Russell

 

Cool Hand Luke

Luke Jackson

Nominated — Academy Award for Best Actor
Nominated —
Golden Globe Award for Best Actor - Motion Picture Drama

1968

The Secret War of Harry Frigg

Pvt. Harry Frigg

 

1969

Winning

Frank Capua

 

Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid

Butch Cassidy

Nominated — BAFTA Award for Best Actor in a Leading Role

1970

WUSA

Rheinhardt

 

1971

Sometimes a Great Notion

Hank Stamper

 

Once Upon a Wheel (1971 TV program)

Himself

Winner: World Television Festival Award,

Winner: Best International Sports Documentary

1972

Pocket Money

Jim Kane

 

The Life and Times of Judge Roy Bean

Judge Roy Bean

 

1973

The Mackintosh Man

Joseph Rearden

 

The Sting

Henry Gondorff

 

1974

The Towering Inferno

Doug Roberts

 

1975

The Drowning Pool

Lew Harper

 

1976

Silent Movie

Himself

 

Buffalo Bill and the Indians

William F. "Buffalo Bill" Cody

 

1977

Slap Shot

Reggie "Reg" Dunlop

 

1979

Quintet

Essex

 

1980

When Time Ran Out...

Hank Anderson

 

1981

Fort Apache, The Bronx

Murphy

 

Absence of Malice

Michael Colin Gallagher

Nominated — Academy Award for Best Actor

1982

Come Along with Me

 

TV

The Verdict

Frank Galvin

David di Donatello for Best Foreign Actor
Nominated —
Academy Award for Best Actor
Nominated —
Golden Globe Award for Best Actor - Motion Picture Drama

1984

Harry & Son

Harry Keach

 

1986

The Color of Money

Fast Eddie Felson

Academy Award for Best Actor
National Board of Review Award for Best Actor
Nominated —
Golden Globe Award for Best Actor - Motion Picture Drama

1989

Fat Man and Little Boy

Gen. Leslie R. Groves

 

Blaze

Gov. Earl K. Long

 

1990

Mr. and Mrs. Bridge

Walter Bridge

 

1993

La Classe américaine

Dave

in redubbed archive footage only

1994

The Hudsucker Proxy

Sidney J. Mussburger

 

Nobody's Fool

Donald J. "Sully" Sullivan

Silver Berlin Bear Award for Best Actor
National Society of Film Critics Award for Best Actor
New York Film Critics Circle Award for Best Actor
Nominated —
Academy Award for Best Actor
Nominated —
Golden Globe Award for Best Actor - Motion Picture Drama
Nominated —
Screen Actors Guild Award for Outstanding Performance by a Male Actor in a Leading Role

1998

Twilight

Harry Ross

 

1999

Message in a Bottle

Dodge Blake

Nominated — Blockbuster Entertainment Award for Favorite Supporting Actor – Drama/Romance

2000

Where the Money Is

Henry Manning

 

2001

The Blunder Years (The Simpsons episode)

Himself

voice

2002

Road to Perdition

John Rooney

Phoenix Film Critics Society Award for Best Supporting Actor
Nominated —
Academy Award for Best Supporting Actor
Nominated —
BAFTA Award for Best Actor in a Supporting Role
Nominated —
Broadcast Film Critics Association Award for Best Supporting Actor
Nominated —
Chicago Film Critics Association Award for Best Supporting Actor
Nominated —
Golden Globe Award for Best Supporting Actor - Motion Picture
Nominated —
Online Film Critics Society Award for Best Supporting Actor
Nominated —
Satellite Award for Best Supporting Actor - Motion Picture

2003

Our Town

Stage Manager

Nominated — Primetime Emmy Award for Outstanding Lead Actor - Miniseries or a Movie
Nominated —
Screen Actors Guild Award for Outstanding Performance by a Male Actor in a Miniseries or Television Movie

2005

Empire Falls

Max Roby

Primetime Emmy Award for Outstanding Supporting Actor - Miniseries or a Movie
Golden Globe Award for Best Performance by an Actor in a Supporting Role in a Series, Mini-Series or Motion Picture Made for Television

Magnificent Desolation: Walking on the Moon 3D

Dave Scott

voice

2006

Cars

Doc Hudson/Hudson Hornet

voice

2007

Dale

Narrator

voice

2008

The Meerkats

Narrator

voice

As director or producer

Year

Film

Notes

1968

Rachel, Rachel

Golden Globe Award for Best Director - Motion Picture
Nominated –
Academy Award for Best Picture
New York Film Critics Circle Award (best director)
[52]

1969

Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid

Co-executive producer (uncredited)

Winning

Co-executive producer (uncredited)

1970

WUSA

Co-producer

1971

Sometimes a Great Notion

Director and co-executive producer

They Might Be Giants

producer

1972

The Effect of Gamma Rays on Man-in-the-Moon Marigolds

Director and producer

The Life and Times of Judge Roy Bean

Co-executive producer (uncredited)

1980

The Shadow Box

Nominated – Emmy Award for Best Director for a Miniseries, Movie or Dramatic Special

1984

Harry & Son

Director and producer

1987

The Glass Menagerie

 

2005

Empire Falls

Producer, Nominated: Primetime Emmy Award for Outstanding Miniseries

Additional awards and honors

In addition to the awards Newman won for specific roles, he received an honorary Academy Award in 1986 for his "many and memorable and compelling screen performances" and the Jean Hersholt Humanitarian Award for his charity work in 1994.

He received the Golden Globe New Star of the Year — Actor award for The Silver Chalice (1957), the Henrietta Award World Film Favorite — Male in 1964 and 1966 and the Cecil B. DeMille Award for Lifetime Achievement in 1984.

Newman won Best Actor at the Cannes Film Festival for The Long, Hot Summer and the Silver Bear at the Berlin Film Festival for Nobody's Fool.

In 1968, Newman was named "Man of the Year" by Harvard University's performance group, the Hasty Pudding Theatricals.

Newman Day has been celebrated at Kenyon College, Bates College, Princeton University, and other American colleges since the 1970s. In 2004, Newman requested that Princeton University disassociate the event from his name, due to the fact that he did not endorse the behaviors, citing his creation of the Scott Newman Centre in 1980, which is "dedicated to the prevention of substance abuse through education".[53]

Posthumously, Newman was inducted into the Connecticut Hall of Fame, and was honored with a 37-acre (150,000 m2) nature preserve in Westport named in his honor. He was also honored by the United States House of Representatives following his death.

Published work

See also

Notes

1.      ^ "Film Star Paul Newman dead at 83." Reuters.com. September 27, 2008. "Paul Newman dies at 83". Cable News Network (CNN.com). September 27, 2008. http://www.cnn.com/2008/SHOWBIZ/Movies/09/27/paul.newman.dead/. Retrieved September 27, 2008. 

2.      ^ "Persons With 5 or More Acting Nominations". Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences. 03/2008. http://awardsdatabase.oscars.org/ampas_awards/help/helpMain.jsp?helpContentURL=statistics
/indexStats.html. Retrieved December 30, 2008. 

3.      ^ a b c d Newman's Own Foundation

4.      ^ Lax, Eric (1996). – Paul Newman: A Biography. – Atlanta, Georgia: Turner Publishing. – ISBN 1570362866.

5.      ^ a b Morella, Joe; Epstein, Edward Z. (1988). – Paul and Joanne: A Biography of Paul Newman and Joanne Woodward. – Delacorte Press. – ISBN 0440500044.

6.      ^ Paul Newman Biography (1925–). – FilmReference.com.

7.      ^ a b Ancestry of Paul Newman. – Genealogy.com.

8.      ^ http://www.scribd.com/doc/15233061/Paul-Newman-A-Life-by-Shawn-Levy-Excerpt

9.      ^ Paul Newman: A Biography

10.  ^

§  Hamill, Denis. – "Paul Newman, A Big Gun at 73". – Buffalo News. – March 7, 1998. – Retrieved: 2008-03-08

§  Ptičie Resumé. – Obecný úrad Ptičie

§  "Fallece el actor Paul Newman" Elmundo.es (September 27, 2008)

11.  ^ Skow, John. – "Verdict on a Superstar". – TIME. – December 6, 1982.

12.  ^ a b c d e f g h Paul Newman biography. – Tiscali.co.uk.com.

13.  ^ a b Paul Newman. – Biographies in Naval History. – Navy.mil.

14.  ^ Hastings, Max (2008). – Retribution: The Battle for Japan, 1944–45. – Random House. – ISBN 0307263517.

15.  ^ http://books.google.com/books?id=AfgbEC0LrFMC&pg=PA11&dq=paul+newman+english+degree&hl
=en&ei=dWEBTpreOMv1
gAeGn7j_DQ&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=8&ved=0CFsQ6AEwBw#v=onepage&q=paul%
20newman%20english
%20degree&f=false

16.  ^ Levant, Oscar (1969). – The Unimportance of Being Oscar. – Pocket Books. – p.56. ISBN 0671771043.

17.  ^

§  Actor Paul Newman's dramatic roots were sprouted on Staten Island

§  Forgotten-NY Neighborhoods: St. George: Staten Island's Wonderland

18.  ^ "Ice From Space". Tales of Tomorrow. 1952-08-08. No. 43, season 1.

19.  ^ Weiner, Ed; Editors of TV Guide (1992). The TV Guide TV Book: 40 Years of the All-Time Greatest Television Facts, Fads, Hits, and History (First ed.). New York: Harper Collins. p. 118. 

20.  ^ http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OKRWD9ec_Eo

21.  ^ Iconoclasts

22.  ^ Paul Newman quits films after stellar career. News.com.au. May 27, 2007. Hollywood star Newman to retire. BBC News. May 27, 2007.

23.  ^ "Paul Newman says he will die at home."[dead link] Herald Sun. August 9, 2008.

24.  ^ "Paul Newman Philanthropy". November 14, 2011. http://www.facesofphilanthropy.com/paul-newman/. Retrieved November 14, 2011. 

25.  ^ "Paul Newman donates $10 mln to Kenyon College". Reuters. June 2, 2007. http://www.reuters.com/article/entertainmentNews/idUSN0238991920070602. Retrieved June 4, 2007. 

26.  ^ "CECP – Committee Encouraging Corporate Philanthropy". Corporatephilanthropy.org. http://www.corporatephilanthropy.org. Retrieved March 10, 2010. 

27.  ^ "The Giving Back 30". The Giving Back Fund. November 1, 2009. http://www.givingback.org/Programs_Services/GivingBack30_2008.html. Retrieved November 4, 2009. 

28.  ^ Pattison, Mark (September 30, 2008). "Catholic film critics laud actor Paul Newman's career, generosity". http://www.catholicnews.com/data/stories/cns/0804957.htm. Retrieved April 11, 2010. 

29.  ^ Clark, Hunter S. People. Time magazine. February 17, 1986.

30.  ^ Welcome. Scott Newman Center.org.

31.  ^ "Remembering Paul Newman." People. September 27, 2008.

32.  ^ "Concern about Paul Newman's health". New York Daily News. March 12, 2008. http://www.nydailynews.com/gossip/2008/03/13/2008-03-13_concern_about_paul_newmans_health.html. Retrieved July 23, 2008.  Ellen, Barbara (October 8, 2006). "It's an age-old quandary — why do men, like dogs, stray?". London: The Guardian. http://www.guardian.co.uk/lifeandstyle/2006/oct/08/familyandrelationships5. Retrieved July 23, 2008. 

33.  ^ "Facts on File". Web.archive.org. Archived from the original on June 21, 2003. http://web.archive.org/web/20030621235432/www.artsci.wustl.edu/~polisci/calvert/PolSci3103/
watergate/enemy.htm. Retrieved March 10, 2010. 

34.  ^ Dodd Gets Financial Boost From Celebs. WFSB.com. April 17, 2007.

35.  ^ Winn, Steven (September 28, 2008). "Paul Newman an icon of cool masculinity". The San Francisco Chronicle. http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?f=/c/a/2008/09/28/MN8R1194R6.DTL. Retrieved March 10, 2010. 

36.  ^ "Cool Hand Nuke: Paul Newman endorses power plant". USA Today. May 23, 2007. http://www.usatoday.com/life/people/2007-05-23-paul-newman_N.htm. Retrieved April 11, 2010. 

37.  ^ http://www.davidwinters.net/onceuponawheel.htm

38.  ^ http://www.davidwinters.net/archives.htm

39.  ^ "XLVII Grand Prix d'Endurance les 24 Heures du Mans 1979". Le Mans & F2 Register. May 2, 2008. http://www.formula2.net/1979.htm. Retrieved September 27, 2008. 

40.  ^ "American Le Mans Series 2000". World Sports Racing Prototypes. October 2, 2005. http://wsrp.ic.cz/alms2000.html#9. Retrieved September 27, 2008. 

41.  ^ Vaughn, Mark (October 6, 2008). "Paul Newman 1925–2008". AutoWeek 58 (40): 43. 

42.  ^ "International Motor Sports Association 1995". World Sports Racing Prototypes. February 14, 2007. http://wsrp.ic.cz/imsa1995.html#1. Retrieved September 27, 2008. 

43.  ^ "Grand-American Road Racing Championship 2005". World Sports Racing Prototypes. December 17, 2005. http://wsrp.ic.cz/grandam2005.html#1. Retrieved September 27, 2008. 

44.  ^ "Newman Leads List of New SCCA Hall of Fame Inductees". Sports Car Club of America. December 3, 2008. http://www.scca.org/newsarticle.aspx?hub=6&news=3533. Retrieved March 13, 2009. 

45.  ^ "Citing Health, Newman Steps Down as Director of Westport's Of Mice and Men". Playbill. May 23, 2008. http://www.playbill.com/news/article/118076.html. Retrieved June 15, 2008. 

46.  ^ "Paul Newman has cancer". – The Daily Telegraph. – June 9, 2008.

47.  ^ Christoffersen, John. "Longtime friend: Paul Newman has cancer". Associated Press. June 11, 2008.

48.  ^ "Newman says he is 'doing nicely'". – BBC – BBC.com. – June 11, 2008.

49.  ^ AP. "Acting legend Paul Newman dies at 83". msnbc. http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/26913988/. Retrieved September 27, 2008. Leask, David. "Paul Newman, Hollywood legend, dies at 83". Scotlandonsunday.scotsman.com. http://scotlandonsunday.scotsman.com/world/Paul-Newman-Hollywood-legend-dies.4535651.jp. Retrieved March 10, 2010. 

50.  ^ "Film star, businessman, philanthropist Paul Newman dies at 83." Free Press.com. September 28, 2008.

51.  ^ Hodge, Lisa. "Legend laid to rest in private family ceremony." ahlanlive.com. Retrieved October 11, 2008.

52.  ^ Bernstein, Adam (September 27, 2008). "Academy-Award Winning Actor Paul Newman Dies at 83". The Washington Post (The Washington Post Company). http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2008/09/27/AR2008092701222.html. Retrieved September 27, 2008. 

53.  ^

§  "Binge drink ritual upsets actor". BBC News. April 24, 2004. http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/entertainment/3652179.stm. 

§  Cheng, Jonathan (April 24, 2004). "Newman's Day – forget it, star urges drinkers". Sydney Morning Herald. http://www.smh.com.au/articles/2004/04/23/1082616331695.html. 

References

Further reading

External links

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John Cleese, (638, cropped)
Oil on canvas
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John Cleese

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
 

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/5/5e/John_Cleese_2008_bigger_crop.jpg/220px-John_Cleese_2008_bigger_crop.jpg
Cleese in 2008

Birth name

John Marwood Cleese

Born

27 October 1939 (1939-10-27) (age 72)
Weston-super-Mare, Somerset, England

Medium

Film, television, radio,
stand-up

Nationality

British

Years active

1961–present

Genres

Surreal comedy, Dark comedy, Physical comedy

Influences

Stephen Leacock, Spike Milligan, The Goons, William Shakespeare

Spouse

Connie Booth (m. 1968–1978) «start: (1968-02-20)–end+1: (1978-09)»"Marriage: Connie Booth to John Cleese" Location: (linkback://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Cleese) (divorced)
Barbara Trentham (m. 1981–1990) «start: (1981-02-15)–end+1: (1990-10-11)»"Marriage: Barbara Trentham to John Cleese" Location: (linkback://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Cleese) (divorced)
Alyce Eichelberger (m. 1992–2008) «start: (1992-12-28)–end+1: (2008-02)»"Marriage: Alyce Eichelberger to John Cleese" Location: (linkback://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Cleese) (divorced)

Domestic partner(s)

Barbie Orr (2008–2009)
Jennifer Wade
(2010–present)

Website

TheJohnCleese.com

John Marwood Cleese (/ˈkliːz/; born 27 October 1939) is an English actor, comedian, writer, and film producer. He achieved success at the Edinburgh Festival Fringe and as a scriptwriter and performer on The Frost Report. In the late 1960s he became a member of Monty Python, the comedy troupe responsible for the sketch show Monty Python's Flying Circus and the four Monty Python films: And Now for Something Completely Different, Holy Grail, Life of Brian, and The Meaning of Life.

In the mid 1970s, Cleese and his first wife, Connie Booth, co-wrote and starred in the British sitcom Fawlty Towers. Later, he co-starred with Kevin Kline, Jamie Lee Curtis, and former Python colleague Michael Palin in A Fish Called Wanda and Fierce Creatures. He also starred in Clockwise, and has appeared in many other films, including two James Bond films, two Harry Potter films, and three Shrek films.

With Yes Minister writer Antony Jay he co-founded Video Arts, the production company responsible for making entertaining training films.



HIDE TEXT


 

Early life

Cleese was born in Weston-super-Mare, Somerset, the only child of Muriel Evelyn (née Cross) (b.1899), an acrobat, and Reginald Francis Cleese (b. 1893), who worked in insurance sales.[1] His family's surname was previously "Cheese", but his father changed it to "Cleese" in 1915 upon joining the Army.[2][3]

Cleese was educated at St Peter's Preparatory School, where he was a star pupil, receiving a prize for English studies and doing well at sports, including cricket and boxing. At 13 he received an exhibition to Clifton College, an English public school in Bristol. He was tall as a child and was well over 6 ft when he arrived there. While at the school he is said to have defaced the school grounds for a prank by painting footprints to suggest that the school's statue of Field Marshal Earl Haig had got down from his plinth and gone to the toilet.[4] Cleese played cricket for the first team, and after initial indifference he did well academically, passing 8 O-Levels and 3 A-Levels in mathematics, physics and chemistry.[5][6]

After leaving school, he went back to his prep school to teach science, English, geography, history, and Latin[7] (he drew on his Latin teaching experience later for a scene in Life of Brian in which he corrects Brian's badly written Latin graffiti[8]) before taking up a place he had won at Downing College, Cambridge, where he studied Law and joined the Cambridge Footlights. There he met his future writing partner Graham Chapman. Cleese wrote extra material for the 1961 Footlights Revue I Thought I Saw It Move,[9][10] and was Registrar for the Footlights Club during 1962, as well as being one of the cast members for the 1962 Footlights Revue Double Take![9][10] He graduated from Cambridge in 1963 with a 2:1 classification in his degree. Despite his successes on The Frost Report, his father would send him cuttings from the Daily Telegraph offering management jobs in places like Marks and Spencer.[11]

Career

Pre-Python

Cleese was one of the script writers, as well as being a member of the cast, for the 1963 Footlights Revue A Clump of Plinths,[9][10] which was so successful during the Edinburgh Festival Fringe that it was renamed Cambridge Circus and taken to the West End in London and then on a tour of New Zealand and Broadway, with the cast also appearing in some of the revue's sketches on The Ed Sullivan Show in September 1964.[10]

After Cambridge Circus, Cleese briefly stayed in America, performing on and Off-Broadway. While performing in the musical Half a Sixpence,[10] Cleese met future Python Terry Gilliam, as well as American actress Connie Booth, whom he married on 20 February 1968.[10]

He was soon offered work as a writer with BBC Radio, where he worked on several programmes, most notably as a sketch writer for The Dick Emery Show. The success of the Footlights Revue led to the recording of a short series of half-hour radio programmes, called I'm Sorry, I'll Read That Again, that were so popular that the BBC commissioned a regular series with the same title that ran from 1965 to 1974. Cleese returned to England and joined the cast.[10] In many episodes, he is credited as "John Otto Cleese".

Also in 1965, Cleese and Chapman began writing on The Frost Report. The writing staff chosen for The Frost Report consisted of a number of writers and performers who would go on to make names for themselves in comedy. They included co-performers from I'm Sorry, I'll Read That Again and future Goodies Bill Oddie and Tim Brooke-Taylor, and also Frank Muir, Barry Cryer, Marty Feldman, Ronnie Barker, Ronnie Corbett, Dick Vosburgh and future Python members Eric Idle, Terry Jones, and Michael Palin. It was while working on The Frost Report, in fact, that the future Pythons developed the writing styles that would make their collaboration significant. Cleese and Chapman's sketches often involved authority figures, some of which were performed by Cleese, while Jones and Palin were both infatuated with filmed scenes that open with idyllic countryside panoramas. Idle was one of those charged with writing David Frost's monologue. It was during this period that Cleese met and befriended influential British comedian Peter Cook.

It was as an actual performer on the Frost Report that Cleese achieved his breakthrough on British television as a comedy actor, appearing as the tall, patrician figure on the classic class sketch, contrasting comically in a line-up with the shorter, middle-class Ronnie Barker and the even-shorter, working-class Ronnie Corbett. Such was the popularity of the series that in 1966 Cleese and Chapman were invited to work as writers and performers with Brooke-Taylor and Feldman on At Last the 1948 Show,[10] during which time the Four Yorkshiremen sketch was written by all four writers/performers (the Four Yorkshiremen sketch is now better known as a Monty Python sketch).[12] Cleese and Chapman also wrote episodes for the first series of Doctor in the House (and later Cleese wrote six episodes of Doctor at Large on his own in 1971). These series were successful, and in 1969 Cleese and Chapman were offered their very own series. However, owing to Chapman's alcoholism, Cleese found himself bearing an increasing workload in the partnership and was therefore unenthusiastic about doing a series with just the two of them. He had found working with Palin on The Frost Report an enjoyable experience and invited him to join the series. Palin had previously been working on Do Not Adjust Your Set with Idle and Jones, with Terry Gilliam creating the animations. The four of them had, on the back of the success of Do Not Adjust Your Set, been offered a series for Thames Television, which they were waiting to begin when Cleese's offer arrived. Palin agreed to work with Cleese and Chapman in the meantime, bringing with him Gilliam, Jones, and Idle.

Monty Python

Monty Python's Flying Circus ran for four seasons from October 1969 to December 1974 on BBC Television, though with only limited participation of Cleese in the last six shows. Cleese's two primary characterisations were as a sophisticate and a stressed-out loony. He portrayed the former as a series of announcers, TV show hosts, and government officials (for example, "The Ministry of Silly Walks"). The latter is perhaps best represented in the "Cheese Shop" and by Cleese's Mr Praline character, the man with a dead Norwegian Blue parrot and a menagerie of other animals all named "Eric". He was also known for his working-class "Sergeant Major" character, who worked as a Police Sergeant, Roman Centurion, etc. He is also seen as the opening announcer with the now famous line "And now for something completely different", although in its premiere in the sketch "Man with Three Buttocks", the phrase was spoken by Eric Idle.

Partnership with Graham Chapman

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/c/cb/Gnome-mime-audio-openclipart.svg/50px-Gnome-mime-audio-openclipart.svg.png

The Dead Parrot sketch performed on Monty Python's Flying Circus in 1969

Play sound

listen to a clip from the sketch.


Problems listening to this file? See media help.

Along with Gilliam's animations, Cleese's work with Chapman provided Python with its darkest and angriest moments, and many of his characters display the seething suppressed rage that later characterised his portrayal of Basil Fawlty.

Unlike Palin and Jones, Cleese and Chapman actually wrote together—in the same room; Cleese claims that their writing partnership involved his sitting with pen and paper, doing most of the work, while Chapman sat back, not speaking for long periods, then suddenly coming out with an idea that often elevated the sketch to a different level. A classic example of this is the "Dead Parrot" sketch, envisaged by Cleese as a satire on poor customer service, which was originally to have involved a broken toaster and later a broken car (this version was actually performed and broadcast on the pre-Python special How To Irritate People). It was Chapman's suggestion to change the faulty item into a dead parrot, and he also suggested that the parrot be specifically a Norwegian Blue, giving the sketch a surreal air which made it far more memorable.

Their humour often involved ordinary people in ordinary situations behaving absurdly for no obvious reason. Like Chapman, Cleese's poker face, clipped middle-class accent, and imposing height allowed him to appear convincingly as a variety of authority figures, such as policemen, detectives, Nazi officers, or government officials—which he would then proceed to undermine. Most famously, in the "Ministry of Silly Walks" sketch (actually written by Palin and Jones), Cleese exploits his stature as the crane-legged civil servant performing a grotesquely elaborate walk to his office.

Chapman and Cleese also specialised in sketches where two characters would conduct highly articulate arguments over completely arbitrary subjects, such as in the "cheese shop", the "dead parrot" sketch and "The Argument Sketch", where Cleese plays a stone-faced bureaucrat employed to sit behind a desk and engage people in pointless, trivial bickering. All of these roles were opposite Palin (who Cleese often claims is his favourite Python to work with)—the comic contrast between the towering Cleese's crazed aggression and the shorter Palin's shuffling inoffensiveness is a common feature in the series. Occasionally, the typical Cleese-Palin dynamic is reversed, as in "Fish Licence", wherein Palin plays the bureaucrat with whom Cleese is trying to work.

Though the programme lasted four series, by the start of series 3, Cleese was growing tired of dealing with Chapman's alcoholism. He felt, too, that the show's scripts had declined in quality. For these reasons, he became restless and decided to move on. Though he stayed for the third series, he officially left the group before the fourth season. Despite this, he remained friendly with the group, and all six began writing Monty Python and the Holy Grail; Cleese received a credit on episodes of the fourth series which used material from these sessions, and even makes a brief appearance in one episode as the voice of a cartoon in the "Hamlet" episode, though he was officially unconnected with the fourth series. Cleese returned to the troupe to co-write and co-star in the Monty Python films Monty Python and the Holy Grail, Monty Python's Life of Brian and Monty Python's The Meaning of Life, and participated in various live performances over the years.

Post-Python

From 1970 to 1973, Cleese served as rector of the University of St Andrews.[13] His election proved a milestone for the University, revolutionising and modernising the post. For instance, the Rector was traditionally entitled to appoint an "Assessor", a deputy to sit in his place at important meetings in his absence. Cleese changed this into a position for a student, elected across campus by the student body, resulting in direct access and representation for the student body.[14]

Cleese achieved greater prominence in the United Kingdom as the neurotic hotel manager Basil Fawlty in Fawlty Towers, which he co-wrote with his wife Connie Booth. The series won three BAFTA awards when produced and in 2000, it topped the British Film Institute's list of the 100 Greatest British Television Programmes. The series also featured Prunella Scales as Basil's acerbic wife Sybil, Andrew Sachs as the much abused Spanish waiter Manuel ("...he's from Barcelona"), and Booth as waitress Polly, the series' voice of sanity. Cleese based Basil Fawlty on a real person, Donald Sinclair, whom he had encountered in 1970 while the Monty Python team were staying at the Gleneagles Hotel in Torquay while filming inserts for their television series. Reportedly, Cleese was inspired by Sinclair's mantra, "I could run this hotel just fine, if it weren't for the guests." He later described Sinclair as "the most wonderfully rude man I have ever met," although Sinclair's widow has said her husband was totally misrepresented in the series. During the Pythons' stay, Sinclair allegedly threw Idle's briefcase out of the hotel "in case it contained a bomb," complained about Gilliam's "American" table manners, and threw a bus timetable at another guest after they dared to ask the time of the next bus to town.

The first series was screened from 19 September 1975 on BBC 2, initially to poor reviews,[15] but gained momentum when repeated on BBC 1 the following year. Despite this, a second series did not air until 1979, by which time Cleese's marriage to Booth had ended, but they revived their collaboration for the second series. Fawlty Towers consisted of only twelve episodes; Cleese and Booth both maintain that this was to avoid compromising the quality of the series.

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/thumb/a/ae/Tv_muppet_show_john_cleese.jpg/220px-Tv_muppet_show_john_cleese.jpg

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Cleese as a Mexican maraca soloist as part of his 1977 guest appearance on The Muppet Show

In December 1977, Cleese appeared as a guest star on The Muppet Show. Cleese was a fan of the show, and co-wrote much of the episode. He appears in a "Pigs in Space" segment as a pirate trying to hijack the spaceship Swinetrek, and also helps Gonzo restore his arms to "normal" size after Gonzo's cannonball catching act goes wrong. During the show's closing number, Cleese refuses to sing the famous show tune from Man of La Mancha, "The Impossible Dream". Kermit The Frog apologises and the curtain re-opens with Cleese now costumed as a Viking trying some Wagnerian opera as part of a duet with Sweetums. Once again, Cleese protests to Kermit, and gives the frog one more chance. This time, as pictured opposite this text, he is costumed as a Mexican maraca soloist. He has finally had enough and protests that he is leaving the show, saying "You were supposed to be my host. How can you do this to me? Kermit – I am your guest!". The cast joins in with their parody of "The Impossible Dream", singing "This is your guest, to follow that star...". During the crowd's applause that follows the song, he pretends to strangle Kermit until he realises the crowd loves him and accepts the accolades. During the show's finale, as Kermit thanks him, he shows up with a fictional album, his own new vocal record John Cleese: A Man & His Music, and encourages everyone to buy a copy.[16]

This would not be Cleese's final appearance with The Muppets. In their 1981 movie The Great Muppet Caper, Cleese does a cameo appearance as Neville, a local homeowner. As part of the appearance, Miss Piggy borrows his house as a way to impress Kermit The Frog.

Cleese won the TV Times award for Funniest Man On TV – 1978 / 1979.[17]

1980s and 1990s

During the 1980s and 1990s, Cleese focused on film, though he did work with Peter Cook in his one-off TV special Peter Cook and Co. in 1980. In the same year Cleese played Petruchio, in Shakespeare's The Taming of the Shrew in the BBC Television Shakespeare series. In 1981 he starred with Sean Connery and Michael Palin in the Terry Gilliam-directed Time Bandits as Robin Hood. He also participated in Monty Python Live at the Hollywood Bowl (1982), and starred in The Secret Policeman's Ball for Amnesty International. In 1985, Cleese had a small dramatic role as a sheriff in Silverado, which had an all-star cast that included Kevin Kline, with whom he would star with in A Fish Called Wanda three years later. In 1986, he starred in Clockwise as an uptight school headmaster obsessed with punctuality and constantly getting in to trouble during a journey to a headmaster's conference.

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/c/cf/John_Cleese_at_1989_Oscars.jpg/170px-John_Cleese_at_1989_Oscars.jpg

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Cleese at the 1989 Academy Awards

Timed with the 1987 UK elections, he appeared in a video promoting proportional representation.[18]

In 1988, he wrote and starred in A Fish Called Wanda, as the lead, Archie Leach, along with Jamie Lee Curtis, Kevin Kline and Michael Palin. Wanda was a commercial and critical success, and Cleese was nominated for an Academy Award for his script. Cynthia Cleese starred as Leach's daughter.

Graham Chapman was diagnosed with throat cancer in 1989; Cleese, Michael Palin, Peter Cook and Chapman's partner David Sherlock, witnessed Chapman's death. Chapman's death occurred a day before the 20th anniversary of the first broadcast of Flying Circus, with Jones commenting, "the worst case of party-pooping in all history." Cleese's eulogy at Chapman's memorial service—in which he "became the first person ever at a British memorial service to say 'fuck'"—has since become legendary.[19]

Cleese would later play a supporting role in Kenneth Branagh's adaptation of Mary Shelley's Frankenstein alongside Branagh himself and Robert De Niro. He also produced and acted in a number of successful business training films, including Meetings, Bloody Meetings and More Bloody Meetings. These were produced by his company Video Arts.

With Robin Skynner, the group analyst and family therapist, Cleese wrote two books on relationships: Families and How to Survive Them, and Life and How to Survive It. The books are presented as a dialogue between Skynner and Cleese.

In 1996, Cleese declined the British honour of Commander of the Order of the British Empire (CBE). The follow-up to A Fish Called Wanda, Fierce Creatures—which again starred Cleese alongside Kevin Kline, Jamie Lee Curtis and Michael Palin—was also released that year, but was greeted with mixed reception by critics and audiences. Cleese has since often stated that making the second movie had been a mistake. When asked by his friend, director and restaurant critic Michael Winner, what he would do differently if he could live his life again, Cleese responded, "I wouldn’t have married Alyce Faye Eichelberger and I wouldn’t have made Fierce Creatures."[20]

In 1999, Cleese appeared in the James Bond movie, The World Is Not Enough as Q's assistant, referred to by Bond as "R". In 2002, when Cleese reprised his role in Die Another Day, the character was promoted, making Cleese the new quartermaster (Q) of MI6. In 2004, Cleese was featured as Q in the video game James Bond 007: Everything or Nothing, featuring his likeness and voice. Cleese did not appear in the subsequent Bond films, Casino Royale and Quantum of Solace.

2000 to present

Cleese is Provost's Visiting Professor at Cornell University, after having been Andrew D. White Professor-at-Large from 1999–2006. He makes occasional, well-received appearances on the Cornell campus, but he lives in the town of Montecito, California.[21]

In 2001, Cleese was cast in the comedy Rat Race as the eccentric hotel owner Donald P. Sinclair, the name of the Torquay hotel owner on who he had based the character of Basil Fawlty.[22]

In a 2005 poll of comedians and comedy insiders The Comedian's Comedian, Cleese was voted second only to Peter Cook. Also in 2005, a long-standing piece of Internet humour, "The Revocation of Independence of the United States", was wrongly attributed to Cleese.

In 2006, Cleese hosted a television special of football’s greatest kicks, goals, saves, bloopers, plays and penalties, as well as football’s influence on culture (including the famous Monty Python sketch “Philosophy Football”), featuring interviews with pop culture icons Dave Stewart, Dennis Hopper and Henry Kissinger, as well as football greats including Pelé, Mia Hamm and Thierry Henry. The Art of Soccer with John Cleese[23] was released in North America on DVD in January 2009 by BFS Entertainment & Multimedia.

Cleese lent his voice to the BioWare video game Jade Empire. His role was that of an "outlander" named Sir Roderick Ponce von Fontlebottom the Magnificent Bastard, stranded in the Imperial City of the Jade Empire. His character is essentially a British colonialist stereotype who refers to the people of the Jade Empire as "savages in need of enlightenment". His armour has the design of a fork stuck in a piece of cheese.

He also had a cameo appearance in the computer game Starship Titanic as "The Bomb" (credited as "Kim Bread"), designed by Douglas Adams.[24]

In 2002, Cleese made a cameo appearance in the movie The Adventures of Pluto Nash in which he played "James", a computerised chauffeur of a hover car stolen by the title character (played by Eddie Murphy). The vehicle is subsequently destroyed in a chase, leaving the chauffeur stranded in a remote place on the moon.

In 2003, Cleese also appeared as Lyle Finster on the US sitcom Will & Grace. His character's daughter, Lorraine, was played by Minnie Driver. In the series, Lyle Finster briefly marries Karen Walker (Megan Mullally).

In 2004, Cleese was credited as co-writer of a DC Comics graphic novel entitled Superman: True Brit. Part of DC's "Elseworlds" line of imaginary stories, True Brit, mostly written by Kim Howard Johnson, suggests what might have happened had Superman's rocket ship landed in Britain, not America.

From 10 November to 9 December 2005, Cleese toured New Zealand with his stage show, John Cleese—His Life, Times and Current Medical Problems. Cleese described it as "a one-man show with several people in it, which pushes the envelope of acceptable behaviour in new and disgusting ways." The show was developed in New York with William Goldman and includes Cleese's daughter Camilla as a writer and actor (the shows were directed by Australian Bille Brown). His assistant of many years, Garry Scott-Irvine, also appeared, and was listed as a co-producer. It then played in universities in California and Arizona from 10 January to 25 March 2006 under the title "Seven Ways to Skin an Ocelot".[25] His voice can be downloaded for directional guidance purposes as a downloadable option on some personal GPS-navigation device models by company TomTom.

In June 2006, while promoting a football song in which he was featured, entitled Don't Mention the World Cup, Cleese appears to have claimed that he decided to retire from performing in sitcoms, instead opting to writing a book on the history of comedy and to tutor young comedians.[26] This was an erroneous story, the result of an interview with The Times of London (the piece was not fact checked before printing).

In 2007, Cleese appeared in ads for Titleist as a golf course designer named "Ian MacCallister", who represents "Golf Designers Against Distance".

In 2007, he started filming the sequel to The Pink Panther, titled The Pink Panther 2, with Steve Martin and Aishwarya Rai.

On 27 September 2007, The Podcast Network announced it had signed a deal with Cleese to produce a series of video podcasts called HEADCAST to be published on TPN's website. Cleese released the first episode of this series in April 2008 on his own website, headcast.co.uk

In 2008, Cleese collaborated with Los Angeles Guitar Quartet member William Kanengiser on the text to the performance piece "The Ingenious Gentleman of La Mancha". Cleese, as narrator, and the LAGQ premiered the work in Santa Barbara.

2008 also saw reports of Cleese working on a musical version of A Fish Called Wanda with his daughter Camilla. He also said that he is working on a new film screenplay for the first time since 1996's Fierce Creatures. Cleese collaborates on it with writer Lisa Hogan, under the current working title "A Taxing Time". According to him, it is "about the lengths to which people will go to avoid tax. [...] It's based on what happened to me when I cashed in my UK pension and moved to Santa Barbara."[27]

At the end of March 2009, Cleese published his first article as 'Contributing Editor' to The Spectator: "The real reason I had to join The Spectator".[28]

On 6 May 2009, he appeared on The Paul O'Grady Show. Cleese has also hosted comedy galas at the Montreal Just for Laughs comedy festival in 2006, and again in 2009. He had to cancel the 2009 appearance due to prostatitis, but hosted it a few days later.[29]

Towards the end of 2009 and into 2010, Cleese appeared in a series of television adverts for the Norwegian electric goods shop chain, Elkjøp.[30]

In March 2010 it was announced that Cleese would be playing Jasper in the video game "Fable III".[31]

In 2009 and 2010, Cleese toured Scandinavia and the US with his Alimony Tour Year One and Year Two. In May 2010, it was announced that this tour would extend to the UK (his first tour in UK), set for May 2011 – The show is dubbed the "Alimony Tour" in reference to the financial implications of Cleese's divorce. The UK tour started in Cambridge on 3 May, visiting Birmingham, Salford, Liverpool, Oxford, Leeds, Edinburgh and finishing in Palmerston North, New Zealand.[32]

In October 2010, Cleese was featured in the launch of an advertising campaign by The Automobile Association for a new home emergency response product.[33] He appeared as a man who believed the AA could not help him during a series of disasters, including water pouring through his ceiling, with the line "The AA? For faulty showers?"

Personal life

1960s to 1980s

Cleese met Connie Booth in the US during the late 1960s and the couple married in 1968.[15] In 1971, Booth gave birth to Cynthia Cleese, their only child. With Booth, Cleese wrote the scripts for and co-starred in both series of the TV series Fawlty Towers, even though the two were actually divorced before the second series was finished and aired. Cleese and Booth are said to have remained close friends since.[34]

Cleese married American actress Barbara Trentham in 1981.[35] Their daughter Camilla, Cleese's second child, was born in 1984. He and Trentham divorced in 1990. During this time, Cleese moved from the United Kingdom to California.[36]

1990s to present

On 28 December 1992 he married American psychotherapist Alyce Faye Eichelberger. In January 2008 the couple announced they had split. The divorce was settled in December 2008. The divorce settlement left Eichelberger with £12 million in finance and assets, including £600,000 a year for seven years. Cleese stated that "What I find so unfair is that if we both died today, her children would get much more than mine".[37]

In April 2010, Cleese revealed on The Graham Norton Show on BBC One that he had started a new relationship with a woman 31 years his junior, Jennifer Wade. In this same show, he revealed that he is no longer a vegetarian, as he claimed to have enjoyed eating dog in Hong Kong.[38][39][40]

During the disruption caused by the Eyjafjallajökull eruption in 2010 Cleese became stranded in Oslo and decided to take a taxi to Brussels. The 1500 km journey cost £3,300 and was completed with the help of three drivers who took shifts in driving Cleese to his destination where he planned to take a Eurostar passenger train to the UK.[41]

Cleese has a passion for lemurs.[42][43] Following the 1997 comedy film Fierce Creatures, in which the ring-tailed lemur played a key role, he hosted the 1998 BBC documentary In the Wild: Operation Lemur with John Cleese, which tracked the progress of a reintroduction of Black-and-white Ruffed Lemurs back into the Betampona Reserve in Madagascar. The project had been partly funded by Cleese's donation of the proceeds from the London premier of Fierce Creatures.[43][44] Cleese is quoted as saying, "I adore lemurs. They're extremely gentle, well-mannered, pretty and yet great fun... I should have married one."[42]

Political views

Currently a member of the Liberal Democrats after previously being a Labour party voter, Cleese switched to the SDP after their formation in 1981, and during the 1987 general election, Cleese recorded a nine minute party political broadcast for the SDP-Liberal Alliance, which spoke about the similarities and failures of the other two parties in a more humorous tone than standard political broadcasts. Cleese has since appeared in broadcasts for the Liberal Democrats, in the 1997 general election and narrating a radio election broadcast for the party during the 2001 general election.[45] In April 2010, Cleese tweeted his support for the Lib Dems after Nick Clegg performed strongly in the first leaders' debate on ITV1, stating: "Well, well, well. First leaders debate, and LibDems do so well. Good luck to them."[46]

In 2011, Cleese declared his support for Britain's coalition government between the Conservatives and Liberal Democrats, saying: "I think what’s happening at the moment is rather interesting. The Coalition has made everything a little more courteous and a little more flexible. I think it was quite good that the Liberal Democrats had to compromise a bit with the Tories." He also criticised the previous Labour government, commenting: "Although my inclinations are slightly left-of-centre, I was terribly disappointed with the last Labour government. Gordon Brown lacked emotional intelligence and was never a leader." Cleese also declared his support for proportional representation.[47]

In April 2011, Cleese revealed that he had declined a life peerage for political services in 1999. Outgoing leader of the Liberal Democrats, Paddy Ashdown, had put forward the suggestion shortly before he stepped down, with the idea that Cleese would take the party whip and sit as a working peer, but the actor quipped that he "realised this involved being in England in the winter and I thought that was too much of a price to pay."[48]

Cleese expressed support for Barack Obama's presidential candidacy, donating US$2,300 to his campaign and offering his services as a speech writer.[49] He also criticised Republican Vice-Presidential candidate Sarah Palin—saying that "Michael Palin is no longer the funniest Palin"[50]— and wrote a satirical poem about Fox News commentator Sean Hannity for Countdown with Keith Olbermann.[51]

Radio credits

Television credits

Major roles

As host

Guest appearances

Filmography

Films

Year

Title

Role

Notes

1968

Interlude

TV Publicist

 

1969

Magic Christian, TheThe Magic Christian

Mr. Dougdale (director in Sotheby's)

 

1969

Best House in London, TheThe Best House in London

Jones

Uncredited

1970

Rise and Rise of Michael Rimmer, TheThe Rise and Rise of Michael Rimmer

Pummer

Writer

1971

And Now for Something Completely Different

Various Roles

Writer

1974

Romance with a Double Bass

Musician Smychkov

Writer

1975

Monty Python and the Holy Grail

Various Roles

Writer

1976

Meetings, Bloody Meetings

Tim

Writer/Executive Producer
Documentary Short

1977

Strange Case of the End of Civilization as We Know It, TheThe Strange Case of the End of Civilization as We Know It

Arthur Sherlock Holmes

 

1979

Monty Python's Life of Brian

Various Roles

Writer

1980

Secret Policeman's Ball, TheThe Secret Policeman's Ball

Himself-Various Roles

 

1981

Great Muppet Caper, TheThe Great Muppet Caper

Neville

 

1981

Time Bandits

Gormless Robin Hood

 

1982

Privates on Parade

Major Giles Flack

 

1983

Yellowbeard

Blind Pew

 

1983

Monty Python's The Meaning of Life

Various Roles

Writer

1985

Silverado

Langston

 

1986

Clockwise

Mr. Stimpson

Evening Standard British Film Awards Peter Sellers Award for Comedy

1988

Fish Called Wanda, AA Fish Called Wanda

lawyer Archie Leach

Writer/Executive Producer
BAFTA Award for Best Actor in a Leading Role
Nominated—
Academy Award For Best Original Screenplay
Nominated—
BAFTA Award for Best Original Screenplay
Nominated—
Golden Globe Award for Best Actor – Motion Picture Musical or Comedy

1989

Erik the Viking

Halfdan the Black and Svend Berserk

 

1989

The Big Picture

Bartender

 

1990

Bullseye!

Man on the Beach in
Barbados Who Looks Like John Cleese

 

1991

An American Tail: Fievel Goes West

Cat R. Waul

Voice Only

1992

Did I Ever Tell You How Lucky You Are?

 

Narrator

1993

Splitting Heirs

Raoul P. Shadgrind

 

1994

Mary Shelley's Frankenstein

Professor Waldman

 

1994

Jungle Book, TheDisney's Rudyard Kipling's The Jungle Book

Dr. Julius Plumford

 

1994

Swan Princess, TheThe Swan Princess

Jean-Bob

 

1996

Wind in the Willows, TheThe Wind in the Willows

Mr. Toad's Lawyer

 

1996

Fierce Creatures

Rollo Lee

Writer/Producer

1997

George of the Jungle

An Ape Named 'Ape'

Voice Only

1998

In the Wild: Operation Lemur with John Cleese

Host

Narrator

1999

Out-of-Towners, TheThe Out-of-Towners

Mr. Mersault

 

1999

World Is Not Enough, TheThe World Is Not Enough

R

 

2000

Isn't She Great

Henry Marcus

 

2000

Magic Pudding, TheThe Magic Pudding

Albert, The Magic Pudding

Voice Only

2001

Quantum Project

Alexander Pentcho

 

2001

Here's Looking at You: The Evolution of the Human Face

 

Narrator

2001

Rat Race

Donald P. Sinclair

 

2001

Harry Potter and the Philosopher's Stone

"Nearly Headless Nick"

 

2002

Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets

"Nearly Headless Nick"

Nominated—Phoenix Film Critics Society Award for Best Ensemble Acting

2002

Roberto Benigni's Pinocchio

The Talking Crickett

Voice Only: English Version

2002

Die Another Day

Q

Second appearance in a James Bond film,
replaces
Desmond Llewelyn as Q in the series

2002

Adventures of Pluto Nash, TheThe Adventures of Pluto Nash

James

 

2003

Charlie's Angels: Full Throttle

Mr. Munday

 

2003

Scorched

Charles Merchant

 

2003

George of the Jungle 2

An Ape Named 'Ape'

Voice Only

2004

Shrek 2

King Harold

Voice Only

2004

Around the World in 80 Days

Grizzled Sergeant

 

2005

Valiant

Mercury

Voice Only

2006

Charlotte's Web

Samuel the Sheep

Voice Only

2006

Man About Town

Dr. Primkin

 

2007

Shrek the Third

King Harold

Voice Only

2008

Igor

Dr. Glickenstein

Voice Only

2008

Day the Earth Stood Still, TheThe Day the Earth Stood Still

Dr. Barnhardt

 

2009

Pink Panther 2, TheThe Pink Panther 2

Inspector Charles Dreyfus

 

2009

Planet 51

Professor Kipple

Voice Only

2010

Spud

The Guv

Awaiting international release

2010

Legend of the Guardians: The Owls of Ga'Hoole

Ghost

Voice Only

2010

Shrek Forever After

King Harold

Voice Only

2011

Happy Feet 2

Himself

Voice Only
post-production

2011

Winnie the Pooh

Narrator

Voice Only

Video game credits

Awards