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Nicolas Cage (745).
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Nicolas Cage

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

 

Description: Nicolas Cage 2011 CC.jpg

Cage at the 2011 San Diego Comic-Con International

Born

Nicolas Kim Coppola
(1964-01-07) January 7, 1964 (age 50)
Long Beach, California, US

Occupation

Actor, film director, film producer

Years active

1980–present

Spouse(s)

Children

2

Parents

August Coppola

Family

Nicolas Kim Coppola (born January 7, 1964),[1][2][3][4] known professionally as Nicolas Cage, is an American actor, director, and producer. He has performed in leading roles in a variety of films, ranging from romantic comedies and dramas to science fiction and action films. Cage is known for his prolificacy, appearing in at least one film per year nearly every year since 1980, with the exception of 1985 and 1991.

 

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In the early years of his career, Cage starred in films such as Valley Girl (1983), Racing with the Moon (1984), Birdy (1984), Peggy Sue Got Married (1986), Raising Arizona (1987), Moonstruck (1987), Vampire's Kiss (1989), Wild at Heart (1990), Honeymoon in Vegas (1992), and Red Rock West (1993).

Cage received an Academy Award, a Golden Globe, and Screen Actors Guild Award for his performance as an alcoholic Hollywood writer in Leaving Las Vegas (1995) before coming to the attention of wider audiences with mainstream films such as The Rock (1996), Face/Off (1997), Con Air (1997), City of Angels (1998), and National Treasure (2004). He earned his second Academy Award nomination for his performance as Charlie and Donald Kaufman in Adaptation (2002). In 2002, he directed the film Sonny, for which he was nominated for Grand Special Prize at Deauville Film Festival. Cage owns the production company Saturn Films and has produced films such as Shadow of the Vampire (2000) and The Life of David Gale (2003).

Though his performances in The Weather Man (2005), Lord of War (2005), The Bad Lieutenant: Port of Call New Orleans (2009), and Kick-Ass (2010) earned critical acclaim, and films such as Ghost Rider (2007) and Knowing (2009) were box office successes, Cage has been strongly criticized in recent years for his choice of roles, some of which have been universally panned.[5][6] He starred in The Croods, The Frozen Ground, and Joe, which all received acclaim.

Early life

Cage was born in Long Beach, California, the son of August Floyd Coppola, a professor of literature, and Joy (Vogelsang), a dancer and choreographer. He was raised in a Catholic family.[7][8] His father was of Italian descent and his mother is of German and Polish descent.[9] His paternal grandparents were composer Carmine Coppola and actress Italia Pennino, and his paternal great-grandparents were immigrants from Bernalda, Basilicata.[10] Through his father, he is the nephew of director Francis Ford Coppola and of actress Talia Shire, and the cousin of directors Roman Coppola and Sofia Coppola, film producer Gian-Carlo Coppola, and actors Robert Carmine and Jason Schwartzman.

Cage's two brothers are New York radio personality Marc "The Cope" Coppola and director Christopher Coppola. He attended Beverly Hills High School, which is known for its many alumni who became entertainers. He aspired to act from an early age and also attended UCLA School of Theater, Film and Television. His first non-cinematic acting experience was in a school production of Golden Boy. He cites James Dean as the key inspiration for his career, saying: "I started acting because I wanted to be James Dean. I saw him in Rebel Without a Cause, East of Eden. Nothing affected me - no rock song, no classical music - the way Dean affected me in Eden. It blew my mind. I was like, 'That's what I want to do'."[11]

Career

Acting career

To avoid the appearance of nepotism as the nephew of Francis Ford Coppola, he changed his name early in his career to Nicolas Cage, inspired in part by the Marvel Comics superhero Luke Cage. Since his minor role in the film Fast Times at Ridgemont High, with Sean Penn, Cage has appeared in a wide range of films, both mainstream and offbeat. He auditioned for the role of Dallas Winston in his uncle's film The Outsiders, based on S.E. Hinton's novel, but lost to Matt Dillon. He was also in Coppola's films Rumble Fish and Peggy Sue Got Married.

Other Cage roles included appearances in the acclaimed 1987 romantic-comedy film Moonstruck, also starring Cher; The Coen Brothers cult-classic comedy Raising Arizona; David Lynch's 1990 film Wild at Heart; a lead role in Martin Scorsese's 1999 New York City paramedic drama Bringing Out the Dead; and Ridley Scott's 2003 drama film Matchstick Men, in which he played an agoraphobic, mysophobic, obsessive-compulsive con artist with a tic disorder.

Cage has been nominated twice for an Academy Award, winning once for his performance as a suicidal alcoholic in Leaving Las Vegas. His other nomination was for his portrayal of real-life screenwriter Charlie Kaufman and Kaufman's fictional twin Donald in Adaptation. Despite these successes, most of his lower-profile films have performed poorly at the box office compared to his mainstream action/adventure roles. The suspense thriller 8mm (1999) is considered a cult film. He took the lead role in the 2001 film Captain Corelli's Mandolin and learned to play the mandolin from scratch for the part. He made his directorial debut with 2002's Sonny. In 2005, two films he headlined, Lord of War and The Weather Man, failed to find a significant audience despite nationwide releases and good reviews for his acting in those roles. Poor reviews for The Wicker Man resulted in low box office sales. The much criticized Ghost Rider (2007), based on the Marvel Comics character, fared better, earning more than $45 million (the top earner) during its opening weekend and over $208 million worldwide through the weekend ending on March 25, 2007. Also in 2007, he starred in Next, which shared the concept of a glimpse into an alternate timeline with Cage's film, The Family Man (2000).

Most of Cage's movies that have achieved financial success were in the action/adventure genre. In his second-highest grossing film to date, National Treasure, he plays an eccentric historian who goes on a dangerous adventure to find treasure hidden by the Founding Fathers of the United States. Other action hits include The Rock, in which Cage plays a young FBI chemical weapons expert who infiltrates Alcatraz Island in hopes of neutralizing a terrorist threat, Face/Off, a John Woo film where he plays both a hero and a villain, and World Trade Center, director Oliver Stone's film regarding the September 11, 2001 attacks. He had a small but notable role as the Chinese criminal mastermind Dr. Fu Manchu in Rob Zombie's fake trailer Werewolf Women of the S.S. from the B-movie double feature Grindhouse.

Cage made his directorial debut with Sonny, a low-budget drama starring James Franco as a male prostitute whose mother (Brenda Blethyn) serves as his pimp. Cage had a small role in the film, which received poor reviews and a short run in a limited number of theatres. Cage's producing career includes Shadow of the Vampire, the first effort from Saturn Films.

In early December 2006, Cage announced at the Bahamas International Film Festival that he planned to curtail his future acting endeavors to pursue other interests. On The Dresden Files for the Sci-Fi Channel, Cage is listed as the executive producer.

In November 2007, Cage was spotted backstage at a Ring of Honor wrestling show in New York City researching his role for The Wrestler. The role was ultimately played by Mickey Rourke, who received an Academy Award nomination for his performance.[12] Wrestler Director Darren Aronofsky, in an interview with slashfilm.com, said of Cage's decision to leave the film that: "Nic was a complete gentleman, and he understood that my heart was with Mickey and he stepped aside. I have so much respect for Nic Cage as an actor and I think it really could have worked with Nic but ... you know, Nic was incredibly supportive of Mickey and he is old friends with Mickey and really wanted to help with this opportunity, so he pulled himself out of the race.[13] "

Description: http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/f/f3/Nicolas_Cage_-_66%C3%A8me_Festival_de_Venise_%28Mostra%29.jpg/170px-Nicolas_Cage_-_66%C3%A8me_Festival_de_Venise_%28Mostra%29.jpg

Cage at the 66th Venice Film Festival in September 2009

In 2008, Cage appeared as Joe, a contract killer who undergoes a change of heart while on a work outing in Bangkok, in the film Bangkok Dangerous. The film is shot by the Pang Brothers and has a distinct South-East Asian flavor. In 2009, Cage starred in science fiction thriller Knowing, directed by Alex Proyas. In the film, he plays an MIT professor who examines the contents of a time capsule unearthed at his son's elementary school. Startling predictions found inside the capsule that have already come true lead him to believe the world is going to end at the close of the week, and that he and his son are somehow involved in the destruction. The film received mainly negative reviews but was the box office winner on its opening weekend. Also in 2009, Cage starred in the film The Bad Lieutenant: Port of Call New Orleans, directed by acclaimed German director Werner Herzog. He portrayed a corrupt police officer with gambling, drug and alcohol addictions. The film was very well received by critics, holding a rating of 87% positive reviews on review aggregator website Rotten Tomatoes.[14] Cage received lauds for his performance, with Michael Phillips of the Chicago Tribune writing "Herzog has found his ideal interpreter, a performer whose truth lies deep in the artifice of performance: ladies and gentlemen, Nicolas Cage, at his finest."[15] This film reunited Cage with Eva Mendes, who played his love interest in Ghost Rider. In 2010, Cage starred in the period piece Season of the Witch, playing a 14th-century knight transporting a girl accused of causing the Black Plague to a monastery, and The Sorcerer's Apprentice, in which he played the sorcerer.[16]

In 2012, Cage reprised his role in Ghost Rider's sequel Ghost Rider: Spirit of Vengeance. He voiced the character Grug Crood in the animated film The Croods, which was released in 2013. The Croods received positive reviews from critics and was a box office success grossing $585 million against a budget of $135 million.[17]

Other works

Cage, an avid comic book fan, auctioned a collection of 400 vintage comics through Heritage Auctions for over $1.6 million in 2002.[18]

In 2007, he created a comic book with his son Weston, called Voodoo Child, which was published by Virgin Comics.

Cage is a fan and collector of painter and underground comic artist Robert Williams. He has written introductions for Juxtapoz magazine and purchased the painting Death On The Boards.[19]

Acting style

In February 2011, Cage said that, at a certain point in his career, he realized that he had developed his own method of acting, which he described as "Nouveau Shamanic." He noted, "at some point I'll have to write a book" about it.[20]

Praise

Cage's acting has been praised by influential film critic Roger Ebert, who wrote in his "Great Movies" essay, about the film Adaptation, that: "There are often lists of the great living male movie stars: De Niro, Nicholson and Pacino, usually. How often do you see the name of Nicolas Cage? He should always be up there. He's daring and fearless in his choice of roles, and unafraid to crawl out on a limb, saw it off and remain suspended in air. No one else can project inner trembling so effectively... he always seems so earnest. However improbable his character, he never winks at the audience. He is committed to the character with every atom and plays him as if he were him."[21] In response to mixed reviews of Knowing and their focus on criticizing Cage, Ebert defended both Cage as an actor and the film which (in contrast to other critics) he gave four out of four stars.[22]

Lord of War co-star Ethan Hawke said of Cage: "He's the only actor since Marlon Brando that's actually done anything new with the art of acting; he's successfully taken us away from an obsession with naturalism into a kind of presentation style of acting that I imagine was popular with the old troubadours." While stating that Cage had hurt his career by working on too many poor projects ("he's put a little too much water in his beer"), Hawke added: "If I could erase his bottom half bad movies, and only keep his top half movies, he would blow everyone else out of the water."[23]

At the 1996 Academy Awards, Cage won the Academy Award for Best Actor for his performance in Leaving Las Vegas.[24] After receiving the award, he went on to star in some high budget action movies, which received criticism by actors such as Stephen Baldwin, Nick Nolte, and Sean Penn, who said to the New York Times that Cage is "no longer an actor" and is "more like a performer".[25] However, in his Oscar acceptance speech for Mystic River, Penn referred to Cage's performance in the critically acclaimed film Matchstick Men as being among the best performances of the year.[26] In May 2001, Cage was awarded an Honorary Doctorate in Fine Arts by California State University, Fullerton. He spoke at the commencement ceremony.[27]

Personal life

Relationships and family

In 1988, Cage began dating actress Christina Fulton, who later bore their son, Weston Coppola Cage (born December 26, 1990). Weston was the lead singer of the black metal band Eyes of Noctum, but broke up in 2012; Arsh Anubis, his new band of the same genre, was formed in 2011. Weston also appeared in Cage's film Lord of War as Vladimir, a young Ukrainian mechanic who quickly disarms a Mil Mi-24 helicopter. Weston is married to Danielle Cage. The pair are parents of a son, Lucian Augustus Coppola Cage, born July 1, 2014.[28]

Cage has been married three times. His first wife was actress Patricia Arquette (married on April 8, 1995, divorce finalized on May 18, 2001).

Cage's second marriage was to singer/songwriter Lisa Marie Presley, daughter of Elvis Presley. Cage is an Elvis fan and used the star as the base of his performance in Wild at Heart. Presley and Cage married on August 10, 2002 and filed for divorce on November 25, 2002 which was finalized on May 16, 2004. The divorce proceeding was longer than the marriage.[29]

Cage met his third and current wife Alice Kim, a former waitress who previously worked at the Los Angeles restaurant Kabuki and at the Los Angeles-based Korean nightclub, Le Privé. She bore their son, Kal-El, (after Superman's birth name[30]) on October 3, 2005. Cage was once considered for the role of Superman in a film to be directed by Tim Burton. Alice had a minor role in the 2007 film Next, which Cage produced. They were married at a private ranch in Northern California on July 30, 2004.[31]

Political and religious views

Cage grew up in a family of Catholic background but does not talk about religion publicly and refuses to answer religion-connected questions in his interviews.[32] When asked about the movie Knowing being a religion-themed film or not, Cage replied: "Any of my personal beliefs or opinions runs the risk of impinging on your own relationship with the movie. I feel movies are best left enigmatic, left raising more questions than answers. I don't want to ever preach. So [whatever you get] from the movie [is] far more interesting than I could ever offer."[33]

During his visit to University of California, Santa Cruz he stated he is not a politically active actor and that he can do it in his work as he learned more about nuclear power from the movie The China Syndrome.[34] Cage has donated about $5,000 to the Democratic Party since 1994.[35]

Charity activities

Cage has been called one of the most generous stars in Hollywood.[36] He donated $2 million to Amnesty International for to use to offer rehabilitation shelters, medical services and psychological and reintegration services to some of the 300,000 children forced to fight in conflicts across the world.[37] He has also donated one million dollars to the victims of Hurricane Katrina.[38] He became the first artist to support ArtWorks, an artist engagement program to raise awareness of fundamental rights at work, including freedom from slavery and from child labor.[39] Cage has also honored with Humanitarian award from United Nations for his works and appointed as an UN ambassador for Global Justice.[40] He led a campaign around the film Lord of War to raise awareness about international Arms Control, supported "Heal the Bay", the United Negro College Fund efforts, and the Royal United Hospital's Forever Friends Appeal to build intensive care units for babies.[41]

Real estate and tax problems

Nicolas Cage is one of Hollywood's highest-paid actors, earning $40 million in 2009 according to Forbes Magazine.[42]

Cage had a Malibu home where he and Kim lived, but sold the property in 2005 for $10 million. In 2004 he bought a property on Paradise Island, Bahamas. In May 2006, he bought a 40-acre (160,000 m2) island in the Exuma archipelago, some 85 miles (137 km) southeast of Nassau and close to a similar island owned by Faith Hill and Tim McGraw.

He bought the medieval castle Schloss Neidstein in the Oberpfalz region in Germany in 2006 and sold it in 2009 for $2.5 million. His grandmother was German, living in Cochem an der Mosel.[43]

Description: http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/2/27/Neidstein_Schloss1.jpg/220px-Neidstein_Schloss1.jpg

Schloss Neidstein in Bavaria was owned by Cage between 2007 and 2009.

In August 2007, Cage purchased "Grey Craig", a 24,000-square-foot (2,200 m2) brick-and-stone country manor in Middletown, Rhode Island. With an estate occupying 26 acres (110,000 m2) the home has 12 bedrooms and 10 full bathrooms and overlooks the Atlantic Ocean. It borders the Norman Bird Sanctuary to the west. The sale ranked among the state of Rhode Island's most expensive residential purchases until eclipsed that same year, 2007, by the $17.15 million sale of the Miramar mansion on Bellevue Avenue in Newport.

Also in 2007, the actor purchased Midford Castle in Somerset, England.[44][45][46] Shortly after selling his German castle, Cage also put homes in Rhode Island, Louisiana, Nevada, and California, as well as a $7 million island in the Bahamas, up for sale.

On July 14, 2009, the Internal Revenue Service filed documents in New Orleans in connection with a federal tax lien against property owned by Cage in Louisiana, concerning unpaid federal taxes. The IRS alleges that Cage failed to pay over $6.2 million in federal income tax for the year 2007.[47] In addition, the Internal Revenue Service has another lien for more than $350,000 in unpaid taxes dating from 2002 to 2004.[48] Cage filed a $20 million lawsuit on October 16, 2009, against his business manager, Samuel J. Levin, alleging negligence and fraud.[49] The lawsuit states that Levin "had failed to pay taxes when they were due and had placed [Cage] in speculative and risky real estate investments 'resulting in (the actor) suffering catastrophic losses'."[49] Cage is also facing separate lawsuits from East West Bank[50] and Red Curb Investments for unpaid, multimillion dollar loans.

Description: Three-storey rectangular building

The LaLaurie Mansion in New Orleans was purchased anonymously by Cage in 2007 and sold in 2009.

Samuel Levin filed a counter-complaint and responded to the lawsuit in a filing stating that he warned Cage that he was living beyond his means and urged him to spend less. Levin's filing states that "instead of listening to Levin, cross-defendant Cage (Coppola) spent most of his free time shopping for high ticket purchases, and wound up with 15 personal residences", Levin's complaint continued: "Likewise, Levin advised Coppola against buying a Gulfstream jet, against buying and owning a flotilla of yachts, against buying and owning a squadron of Rolls Royces, against buying millions of dollars in jewelry and art."[51]

In his filing Levin says that in 2007 Cage's "shopping spree entailed the purchase of three additional residences at a total cost of more than $33 million; the purchase of 22 automobiles (including 9 Rolls Royces); 12 purchases of expensive jewelry; and 47 purchases of artwork and exotic items."[51] One of those exotic items was a dinosaur skull of a Tarbosaurus for which Nicolas Cage paid $276,000 in an auction after winning a bidding contest against Leonardo DiCaprio.[52]

According to Cage, he owned the "Most Haunted House in America", a home located in the French Quarter of New Orleans, Louisiana.[53] Known as "The LaLaurie House" after its former owner Delphine LaLaurie, the house was foreclosed and sold at auction on November 12, 2009 along with another New Orleans property for a total of $5.5 million, in the wake of Cage's financial problems.[54]

His Bel Air home, which had six loans totaling $18 million on it, failed to sell at an April 2010 foreclosure auction despite an opening offer of $10.4 million, substantially less than the $35 million that Cage had originally tried to sell it for. The home, built in 1940 for $110,000 had been owned by Dean Martin and singer Tom Jones.[55] The home eventually sold in November 2010 for $10.5 million.[56] Another home in Nevada also faces foreclosure auction.[54]

In November 2011, Cage also sold his Action Comics 1 in an online auction for a record-breaking $2.16 million (the previous record being 1.5), to assist paying his tax liens and other debts. Cage purchased the comic in 1997 for $110,000.[57]

Legal issues

In December 2009, Christina Fulton sued Cage for $13 million and for the house in which she was living. The suit was in response to an order that she leave the dwelling; the order resulted from Cage's financial difficulties.[58]

On April 15, 2011, at 11:30 pm, Cage was arrested in New Orleans' French Quarter district for suspicion of domestic abuse battery, disturbing the peace and public intoxication, after a police officer was flagged down by onlookers after Cage allegedly grabbed his wife's upper arm while appearing to be under the influence of alcohol.[59] Cage was held in police custody until a bail of $11,000 was posted by Duane "Dog" Chapman.[60] He was later ordered to appear in court on May 31, 2011.[61] On May 5, 2011, it was announced that the charges against Cage had been dropped.[62][63][64]

Filmography

Main article: Nicolas Cage filmography

Awards and nominations

Main article: List of awards and nominations received by Nicolas Cage

See also

Description: Portal icon

Film portal

References

    1. Jump up ^ "Nicolas Cage – Biography". Tiscali.co.uk. Retrieved October 21, 2009. 
    2. Jump up ^ Nicolas Cage
    3. Jump up ^ Contemporary theatre, film, and television. Gale Research Company. 2000. 
    4. Jump up ^ Naden, Corinne J.; Blue, Rose (2003). Nicolas Cage. Lucent Books. 
    5. Jump up ^ "Will 'Season of the Witch' Hurt Nicolas Cage's Quote?". Forbes. Retrieved September 9, 2013. 
    6. Jump up ^ Rabin, Nathan (September 13, 2012). "Stolen Preview". AV Club. Retrieved May 14, 2014. 
    7. Jump up ^ "Nicholas Cage is back with digit-al thriller 'Knowing'". New York: Daily News. Retrieved July 27, 2011. [dead link]
    8. Jump up ^ "This much I know: Karen Koster". Irish Examiner. Retrieved July 27, 2011. 
    9. Jump up ^ "CRC's EARS Blog :: EARS: September 2004". Earsxxi.blogspot.ca. Retrieved August 9, 2012. 
    10. Jump up ^ Cowie, Peter (1988). Coppola: a biography. Da Capo Press. p. 2. ISBN 0-306-80598-7. 
    11. Jump up ^ "Nicholas Cage on the rise of the celebutard". The Independent. Retrieved March 14, 2014. 
    12. Jump up ^ Bruno, Mike (November 12, 2007). "Mickey Rourke Starring in 'The Wrestler'". Entertainment Weekly. Retrieved August 15, 2010. 
    13. Jump up ^ Sciretta, Peter. "Interview: Darren Aronofsky – Part 1". slashfilm.com. Retrieved August 15, 2010. 
    14. Jump up ^ "'Bad Lieutenant: Port of Call New Orleans' – 312 stars". Au.rottentomatoes.com. Retrieved August 15, 2010. 
    15. Jump up ^ "Talking Pictures: 'Bad Lieutenant: Port of Call New Orleans' – 312 stars". Featuresblogs.chicagotribune.com. November 19, 2009. Retrieved August 15, 2010. 
    16. Jump up ^ "MTV". Moviesblog.mtv.com. Retrieved February 14, 2010. 
    17. Jump up ^ "The Croods". Box Office Mojo. Retrieved October 4, 2013. 
    18. Jump up ^ Susman, Gary (October 1, 2002). "Book Value". Entertainment Weekly. Retrieved August 4, 2010. 
    19. Jump up ^ "ISSUU". ISSUU. Retrieved February 14, 2010. 
    20. Jump up ^ Nicolas Cage Has His Own Acting Method and It’s Called ‘Nouveau Shamanic’" Movieline. Retrieved August 23, 2011
    21. Jump up ^ "Adaptation. :: rogerebert.com :: Great Movies". rogerebert.suntimes.com. Retrieved August 15, 2010. 
    22. Jump up ^ "Love and hate and "Knowing"
      -- or, do wings have angels? :: rogerebert.com :: News & comment"
      . rogerebert.suntimes.com. Retrieved August 15, 2010. 
    23. Jump up ^ Hawke, Ethan (June 5, 2013). "I am Ethan Hawke - AMAA". Reddit. Retrieved June 14, 2013. 
    24. Jump up ^ "1995 Academy Awards Winners and History". FilmSite.org. Retrieved August 18, 2010. 
    25. Jump up ^ People Magazine. "Picking on Nic: Nicolas Cage bites back after Sean Penn ridicules his career." April 5, 1999 Vol. 51 No. 12
    26. Jump up ^ "Oscar accaptence speech of Sean Penn". Aaspeechesdb.oscars.org. February 29, 2004. Retrieved May 14, 2014. 
    27. Jump up ^ "CSU Newsline". Calstate.edu. April 16, 2001. Retrieved February 14, 2010. 
    28. Jump up ^ "Nicolas Cage's Son Weston Cage Welcomes Baby Boy Lucian Augustus With Wife Danielle". US Magazine. Retrieved July 3, 2014. 
    29. Jump up ^ Silverman, Stephen M (May 26, 2004). "Cage-Presley Union Now a Memory". People. Retrieved February 14, 2010. 
    30. Jump up ^ "Baby boy for actor Cage and wife". BBC Online (BBC NEWS). October 4, 2005. Retrieved August 8, 2010. 
    31. Jump up ^ "Nicolas Cage and Alice Kim Marriage Profile". About.com. Retrieved October 14, 2012. 
    32. Jump up ^ "This much I know: Karen Koster". Irish Examiner. Retrieved August 25, 2013. 
    33. Jump up ^ "Nicolas Cage talks "Knowing", religion". Everyjoe.com. March 29, 2009. Retrieved May 14, 2014. 
    34. Jump up ^ "Nicolas Cage visits UCSC". University of California, Santa Cruz. Retrieved August 25, 2013. 
    35. Jump up ^ Celebrity donations - Nicolas Cage
    36. Jump up ^ "Generous Celebs - Forbes Magazine". Forbes.com. Retrieved May 14, 2014. 
    37. Jump up ^ "Nicolas Cage Donate $2 million to Amnesty". Hollywood.com. Retrieved August 25, 2013. 
    38. Jump up ^ "Cage donates 1 Million to Katrina's Victims". News.softpedia.com. Retrieved May 14, 2014. 
    39. Jump up ^ "ILO launches artists programme, Nicolas Cage calls for an end to child labour". International Labour Organization. Retrieved August 25, 2013. 
    40. Jump up ^ "Nicolas Cage wins United Nations humanitarian award". BBC News. Retrieved August 25, 2013. 
    41. Jump up ^ "Nicolas Cage Appointed UNODC Goodwill Ambassador for Global Justice". UNODC. Retrieved August 25, 2013. 
    42. Jump up ^ Lauren Beale (April 8, 2010). "Foreclosure auction of Nicolas Cage's mansion is a flop". Los Angeles Times. Retrieved April 11, 2010. 
    43. Jump up ^ "Oberpfalznetz – Medienhaus DER NEUE TAG". Zeitung.org. Retrieved February 14, 2010. 
    44. Jump up ^ "Hollywood actor is king of the castle in Bath". Daily Mail (London). July 29, 2007. Retrieved January 15, 2008. 
    45. Jump up ^ Hodgson, Martin (July 30, 2007). "Nicolas Cage joins Britain’s castle-owning classes". The Independent (London). Retrieved January 15, 2008. 
    46. Jump up ^ Chittenden, Maurice (July 29, 2007). "Another day, another castle: Cage adds to his empire". The Times (London). Retrieved January 15, 2008. 
    47. Jump up ^ "Nicolas Cage hit with $6.2 million tax bill". Houston Chronicle. August 3, 2009. 
    48. Jump up ^ Rodriguez, Brenda (November 1, 2009). "Nicolas Cage Blames Advisor for Financial Ruin". People. Retrieved November 4, 2009. 
    49. ^ Jump up to: a b Serjeant, Jill (October 16, 2009). "Nicolas Cage sues ex-manager for "financial ruin". Reuters. Retrieved November 4, 2009. 
    50. Jump up ^ "Nicolas Cage sued for $2 million". Economictimes.indiatimes.com. October 3, 2009. Retrieved August 15, 2010. 
    51. ^ Jump up to: a b "Nic Cage spent too much: Ex-manager says". CNN. November 17, 2009. Retrieved May 20, 2010. 
    52. Jump up ^ "Actors in head-to-head at auction house – over a dinosaur skull". Daily Mail (London). July 29, 2007. Retrieved August 15, 2010. 
    53. Jump up ^ Nicolas Cage interview – "Late Show with David Letterman," September 2, 2008
    54. ^ Jump up to: a b Yousuf, Hibah (November 13, 2009). "Nicolas Cage: Movie star, foreclosure victim". CNN. Retrieved November 14, 2009. 
    55. Jump up ^ Beale, Lauren (April 8, 2010). "Foreclosure auction of Nicolas Cage's mansion is a flop". Los Angeles Times. Retrieved December 25, 2010. 
    56. Jump up ^ Beale, Lauren (November 11, 2010). "Nicolas Cage's Bel-Air home goes to new owner for just $10.5 million". Los Angeles Times. Retrieved December 25, 2010. 
    57. Jump up ^ "Super price for Superman comic - CNN.com". CNN. December 2, 2011. 
    58. Jump up ^ The Detroit Free Press, Thursday, December 10, 2009, page 12D
    59. Jump up ^ "Actor Nicolas Cage arrested in New Orleans". Reuters. April 16, 2011. 
    60. Jump up ^ Mike Vilensky. "Nicolas Cage Arrested in New Orleans (Updated)". Vulture. 
    61. Jump up ^ "Nicolas Cage arrested in New Orleans". MSN. 
    62. Jump up ^ Eugene Ernest (May 9, 2011). "Court Cleared all Allegations on Nicolas Cage". 
    63. Jump up ^ "Domestic Abuse Charges Against Nicolas Cage Dropped". May 6, 2011. 
    64. Jump up ^ "Charges dropped against Nicolas Cage in New Orleans". May 6, 2011. 

External links

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Emily Blunt  (744)   Love you, love you not.

Oil on canvas
42 x 63 cm

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Emily Blunt

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

  

Description: Emily Blunt Comic-Con 2013.jpg

Blunt at San Diego Comic-Con, 2013

Born

Emily Olivia Leah Blunt
(1983-02-23) 23 February 1983 (age 31)
London, England

Occupation

Actress

Years active

2003–present

Spouse(s)

John Krasinski (m. 2010)

Children

1

Relatives

Peter Blunt (grandfather)
Crispin Blunt (uncle)
Stanley Tucci (brother-in-law)

Emily Olivia Leah Blunt (born 23 February 1983)[1] is an English actress. She has appeared in The Devil Wears Prada (2006), The Young Victoria (2009), The Adjustment Bureau (2011), Looper (2012), and Edge of Tomorrow (2014). She has been nominated for four Golden Globe Awards, two London Film Critics' Circle Awards, and one BAFTA Award. She won a Golden Globe Award for her work in the BBC television drama Gideon's Daughter (2007).[2] In 2009, she received the BAFTA Britannia Award for British Artist of the Year.[3]

 

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Early life

Blunt was born in London,[4] the second of four children of Joanna, a teacher and former actress, and barrister Oliver Simon Peter Blunt, QC, one of the highest-profile barristers in the United Kingdom who earned an estimated £1 million annually.[5][6][7][8][9] Her siblings are Felicity, Sebastian, and Suzanna. Her grandfather was Major-General Peter Blunt, and one of her paternal uncles is Crispin Blunt,[10] Conservative Member of Parliament for Reigate.[11][12] Blunt attended Ibstock Place School and, at the age of 16, went to Hurtwood House, a private sixth-form college known for its performing arts programme.[13] There, she was discovered by an agent.[13]

Career

Blunt made her professional debut in The Royal Family, a play opposite Judi Dench in Sir Peter Hall's production.[13] Hailed by critics for her performance, she was named "Best Newcomer" by The Evening Standard.[13] She went on to perform as Eugenie in Nicholas Wright's Vincent in Brixton at the National Theatre, and as Juliet in Indhu Rubasingham's production of Romeo and Juliet at Chichester Festival Theatre, both in 2002.[13]

In 2003, Blunt made her screen debut in the British television drama Boudica, about the life of the ancient Celtic warrior-queen who fought the Romans.[13] That same year, she was praised for her performance as the 16th-century queen Catherine Howard in the two-part British television drama Henry VIII.[13]

Description: http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/7/7d/Emily_Blunt_at_the_Orange_British_Academy_Film_Awards_%28cropped%29.jpg/220px-Emily_Blunt_at_the_Orange_British_Academy_Film_Awards_%28cropped%29.jpg

Blunt at the 2007 BAFTAs

In 2004, Blunt delivered her breakout performance as Tamsin in the dark British film, My Summer of Love, a story of deception and lesbian love in the English countryside.[13] She shared an Evening Standard British Film Award for Most Promising Newcomer with co-star Natalie Press.[14]

In 2005, Blunt co-starred with Bill Nighy and Miranda Richardson in the British television drama Gideon's Daughter,[13] an original screenplay written and directed by Stephen Poliakoff, in which she played the troubled only child of New Labour spin doctor Gideon Warner, played by Nighy. Blunt won a Golden Globe for her performance.[15]

In 2006, Blunt appeared opposite Meryl Streep and Anne Hathaway in the box-office success The Devil Wears Prada. Streep and Hathaway received most of the critical attention initially, but Blunt proved to be equally memorable, with Entertainment Weekly naming her the Best Female Scene-Stealer in their end-of-summer special issue. Her role as Emily garnered her nominations to a BAFTA and a Golden Globe Award for Best Supporting Actress. She appeared at the 79th Academy Awards where she co-presented the award for best costume design with her Prada co-star Hathaway.[16] That same year, Blunt co-starred with Susan Sarandon in the independent drama Irresistible. Following production, Sarandon strongly suggested to director David Auburn that he cast Blunt in his next film, The Girl in the Park— a role she did not accept.

Description: http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/e/e1/Emily_Blunt_%288116086140%29.jpg/220px-Emily_Blunt_%288116086140%29.jpg

Blunt at the Toronto International Film Festival in 2012

In 2007, Blunt appeared in four films: Wind Chill, The Jane Austen Book Club, Dan in Real Life, and Charlie Wilson's War.[13] In 2008, Blunt appeared in two films, Sunshine Cleaning in the role of Norah Lorkowski, and The Great Buck Howard as Valerie Brennan.[13] In 2009, Blunt played Queen Victoria in The Young Victoria, directed by Jean-Marc Vallée and written by Julian Fellowes. She also starred in the Toby Spanton-directed short film Curiosity. She was director Jon Favreau's first choice to play the Black Widow in Iron Man 2 but scheduling conflicts with Gulliver's Travels forced her to cede the role to Scarlett Johansson.[17] She voiced Angelina's mother, Matilda Mouseling, in the television series, Angelina Ballerina: The Next Steps.

In 2010, Blunt co-starred with Benicio del Toro and Anthony Hopkins in the big-budget movie The Wolfman, which was released on 12 February. She also starred in Gulliver's Travels and in The Adjustment Bureau, alongside Matt Damon, as a dancer "being mysteriously kept apart" from Damon's character.[18] Blunt was offered the female lead in Captain America: The First Avenger but turned it down.[19] She was replaced by Australian actress Abbie Cornish to play the lead in David Riker's independent film The Girl. She dropped out the film due to scheduling conflicts. In 2011, Blunt was named the ambassadress of the new Yves Saint Laurent fragrance, Opium.[20]

Blunt starred in the 2011 British comedy film Salmon Fishing in the Yemen, directed by Lasse Hallström and co-starring Ewan McGregor and Kristin Scott Thomas.[21] Also that year, she briefly appeared in The Muppets, as Miss Piggy's receptionist. She starred in the 2012 film The Five-Year Engagement, directed by Nicholas Stoller and co-starring Jason Segel. In January 2011, Blunt began filming an American science-fiction film, Looper, directed by Rian Johnson and co-starring Bruce Willis and Joseph Gordon-Levitt; the film was released in September 2012. Also that year, she starred in Arthur Newman with Colin Firth.[22]

In 2014, she starred alongside Tom Cruise in Edge of Tomorrow, the film adaptation of the Japanese novel, All You Need Is Kill by Hiroshi Sakurazaka.[23] Blunt will play the Baker's Wife in the film adaptation of the musical, Into the Woods, which also features her Devil Wears Prada co-star Meryl Streep as the Witch.[24][25]

Personal life

Description: http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/6/6a/Emily_Blunt_and_John_Krasinski.jpg/220px-Emily_Blunt_and_John_Krasinski.jpg

Blunt with husband John Krasinski at the 2013 Golden Globe Awards

Blunt had a three year relationship with Canadian singer Michael Bublé. They met in 2005, while backstage at the Australian television Logie Awards in Melbourne. They later shared a home in Vancouver, Canada, before breaking up in 2008.[26] In November 2008, Blunt began dating American actor John Krasinski. Blunt and Krasinski became engaged in August 2009,[27] and married on 10 July 2010 in Como, Italy.[28] They have one daughter, Hazel, born on 16 February 2014.[29]

Blunt's brother-in-law is her The Devil Wears Prada co-star Stanley Tucci. In 2012, Tucci married Blunt's sister Felicity, who works as a literary agent. Blunt was responsible for introducing the couple.[30][31] Her brother Sebastian is an actor.[32]

As a child from ages 7 to 14, Blunt struggled with stuttering. She credits a school teacher for helping her overcome the stutter through acting.[33] She went on to sit on the board of directors for the American Institute for Stuttering.[34]

Filmography

Year

Title

Role

Notes

2003

Boudica

Isolda

 

2003

Henry VIII

Catherine Howard

Television film

2004

My Summer of Love

Tamsin

 

2005

Strange Case of Sherlock Holmes & Arthur Conan Doyle, TheThe Strange Case of Sherlock Holmes & Arthur Conan Doyle

Jean Leckie

Television film

2005

Gideon's Daughter

Natasha

Television film

2006

Devil Wears Prada, TheThe Devil Wears Prada

Emily Charlton

 

2006

Irresistible

Mara

 

2007

Wind Chill

Girl

 

2007

Dan in Real Life

Ruthie Draper

 

2007

Charlie Wilson's War

Jane Liddle

 

2007

Jane Austen Book Club, TheThe Jane Austen Book Club

Prudie

 

2008

Great Buck Howard, TheThe Great Buck Howard

Valerie Brennan

 

2009

Young Victoria, TheThe Young Victoria

Queen Victoria

 

2009

Sunshine Cleaning

Norah Lorkowski

 

2009

Curiosity

Emma

Short film

2010

Wild Target

Rose

 

2010

Wolfman, TheThe Wolfman

Gwen Conliffe

 

2010

Gulliver's Travels

Princess Mary

 

2011

Gnomeo & Juliet

Juliet (voice)

 

2011

Adjustment Bureau, TheThe Adjustment Bureau

Elise Sellas

 

2011

Muppets, TheThe Muppets

Miss Piggy's Receptionist

 

2012

Five-Year Engagement, TheThe Five-Year Engagement

Violet Barnes

 

2012

Salmon Fishing in the Yemen

Harriet Chetwode-Talbot

 

2012

Your Sister's Sister

Iris

 

2012

Looper

Sara

 

2013

Arthur Newman

Michaela Fitzgerald / Charlotte Fitzgerald

 

2014

The Wind Rises

Naoko Satomi (voice)

English dub

2014

Edge of Tomorrow

Sergeant Rita Rose Vrataski

 

2014

Into the Woods

The Baker's Wife[35]

Post-production

2015

Sicario

Kate Macy

Filming

Television[edit]

Year

Title

Role

Notes

2003

Foyle's War

Lucy Markham

Episode: "War Games"

2004

Agatha Christie's Poirot

Linnet Ridgeway

Episode: "Death on the Nile"

2005

Empire

Camane

Miniseries

2009

Simpsons, TheThe Simpsons

Juliet Hobbes (voice)

Episode: "Lisa the Drama Queen"

2009

Angelina Ballerina: The Next Steps

Matilda Mouseling (voice)

 

Stage[edit]

Year

Title

Role

Notes

2000

Bliss

Maddy[36]

Edinburgh Fringe Festival

2001–2002

Royal Family, TheThe Royal Family

Gwen

Theatre Royal Haymarket

2002

Vincent in Brixton

Eugenie Loyer

National Theatre, London

2002

Romeo and Juliet

Juliet

Chichester Festival Theatre

Radio

Year

Title

Role

Notes

2004

Bumps and Bruises

Holly

BBC Radio 4

Awards and nominations

Year

Award

Category

Production

Result

2004

British Independent Film Award

Most Promising Newcomer

My Summer of Love

Nominated

2005

ALFS Award

British Newcomer of the Year

My Summer of Love

Nominated

2005

Motovun Film Festival

Special Mention (shared with Natalie Press)

My Summer of Love

Won

2005

Evening Standard British Film Award

Most Promising Newcomer (shared with Natalie Press)

My Summer of Love

Won

2006

Teen Choice Award

Movies - Choice Breakout (Female)

The Devil Wears Prada

Nominated

2006

DFWFCA Award

Best Supporting Actress

The Devil Wears Prada

Nominated

2007

MTV Movie Award

Breakthrough Performance

The Devil Wears Prada

Nominated

2007

MTV Movie Award

Best Comedic Performance

The Devil Wears Prada

Nominated

2007

BAFTA Award

Rising Star Award

 

Nominated

2007

BAFTA Film Award

Best Actress in a Supporting Role

The Devil Wears Prada

Nominated

2007

ALFS Award

British Supporting Actress of the Year

The Devil Wears Prada

Won

2007

Golden Globe

Best Performance by an Actress in a Supporting Role in a Motion Picture

The Devil Wears Prada

Nominated

2007

Golden Globe

Best Performance by an Actress in a Supporting Role in a Series or TV Film

Gideon's Daughter

Won

2007

Women in Film Crystal Awards

Face of the Future

 

Won

2009

DFWFCA Award

Best Actress

The Young Victoria

Nominated

2009

British Independent Film Award

Best Actress

The Young Victoria

Nominated

2009

Britannia Award

British Artist of the Year

 

Won

2009

Satellite Award

Best Actress in a Supporting Role

Sunshine Cleaning

Nominated

2009

Satellite Award

Best Actress in a Motion Picture, Drama

The Young Victoria

Nominated

2010

Critics Choice Award

Best Actress

The Young Victoria

Nominated

2010

Costume Designers Guild Award

President's Award

 

Won

2010

Empire Award

Best Actress

The Young Victoria

Nominated

2010

Golden Globe

Best Performance by an Actress in a Motion Picture – Drama

The Young Victoria

Nominated

2010

ALFS Award

British Actress of the Year

The Young Victoria

Nominated

2010

ALFS Award

British Supporting Actress of the Year

Sunshine Cleaning

Nominated

2010

Vancouver Film Critics Circle

Best Actress in a Canadian Film

The Young Victoria

Won

2012

Saturn Award

Best Supporting Actress

The Adjustment Bureau

Won

2012

Gotham Independent Film Award

Best Ensemble Performance

Your Sister's Sister

Won

2012

Chicago Film Critics Association Award

Best Supporting Actress

Looper

Nominated

2013

People's Choice Award

Favorite Comedic Movie Actress

The Five-Year Engagement

Nominated

2013

Broadcast Film Critics Association Award

Best Actress in an Action Movie

Looper

Nominated

2013

Golden Globe Award

Best Actress – Motion Picture Musical or Comedy

Salmon Fishing in the Yemen

Nominated

2013

London Film Critics Circle Award

British Actress of the Year

Your Sister's Sister and Looper

Nominated

2014

Teen Choice Award

Choice Movie Actress: Action

Edge of Tomorrow

Nominated

References

    1. Jump up ^ "Monitor". Entertainment Weekly (1248). 1 March 2013. p. 25. 
    2. Jump up ^ "Emily Blunt". IMDB. Retrieved 31 October 2011. 
    3. Jump up ^ "Britannia Award Honorees - Awards & Events - Los Angeles - The BAFTA site". British Academy of Film and Television Arts (BAFTA). Retrieved 31 July 2012. 
    4. Jump up ^ "Emily Blunt: Biography". TVGuide.com. Retrieved 17 February 2014. 
    5. Jump up ^ "Tory Justice minister's barrister brother earning ?1million-a-year from taxpayer" 11 Jul 2011, daily Mirror
    6. Jump up ^ Times Magazine, 21 February 2009
    7. Jump up ^ Day, Eli TELASO INIe zabeth (21 June 2009). "Enter a new leading lady". The Guardian (London). Retrieved 30 December 2009. 
    8. Jump up ^ Stein, Ruthe (27 September 2007). "Blunt moves from the runway to the royal family". San Francisco Chronicle. Retrieved 30 December 2009. 
    9. Jump up ^ "Oliver Blunt, Esq, QC" at Debretts.com
    10. Jump up ^ "Stanley Tucci Marries Felicity Blunt". People. 8 August 2012. Retrieved 24 August 2012. 
    11. Jump up ^ "Tory prisons minister Crispin Blunt stuns MPs by revealing he's gay as he splits from wife of 20 years" Daily Mail
    12. Jump up ^ "£1.1m earnings in a year for top legal aid barrister". Daily Mail (London). 25 June 2007. Retrieved 26 June 2007. 
    13. ^ Jump up to: a b c d e f g h i j k "Emily Blunt- Biography". Yahoo Movies. Retrieved 15 October 2012. 
    14. Jump up ^ Jones, Alison (22 June 2012). "Emily Blunt: Doing my own dishes helps me stay grounded". Birmingham Post. Retrieved 15 October 2012. 
    15. Jump up ^ "Emily Blunt 2007 Golden Globes Acceptance speech". YouTube. Retrieved 15 October 2012. 
    16. Jump up ^ "Devil Wears Prada Forced Emily Blunt To Emaciate Herself". Cinemablend.com. 11 July 2006. Retrieved 13 March 2010. 
    17. Jump up ^ "Iron Man 2: Scarlett Johansson to replace Emily Blunt as Black Widow?". 
    18. Jump up ^ "Emily Blunt To Star Opposite Matt Damon In The Adjustment Bureau". Slashfilm.com. 14 July 2009. Retrieved 13 March 2010. 
    19. Jump up ^ "Marvel makes Emily Blunt an offer for 'Captain America,' but British actress probably will say no – UPDATED". Los Angeles Times. 2 April 2010. 
    20. Jump up ^ Whitworth, Melissa (4 November 2011). "Emily Blunt's Opium campaign revealed". The Daily telegraph. Retrieved 15 October 2012. 
    21. Jump up ^ Lasse Hallström goes Fishing In The Yemen TotalFilm.com
    22. Jump up ^ "Emily Blunt and Colin Firth in Arthur Newman, Golf Pro", 14 May 2011, Britscene
    23. Jump up ^ Szalai, Georg (10 January 2012). "Tom Cruise's 'All You Need Is Kill' to Hit Theaters in March 2014". Hollywood Reporter. Retrieved 15 October 2012. 
    24. Jump up ^ Emily Blunt Confirms INTO THE WOODS Starring Role; Jake Gyllenhaal, Too? Retrieved 5 June 2013
    25. Jump up ^ Emily Blunt to Sing Better in Into the Woods Than She Did in That Karaoke Video Retrieved 5 June 2013
    26. Jump up ^ Mascia, Kristen. "Emily Blunt and Michael Bublé Split". People. Retrieved 1 November 2011. 
    27. Jump up ^ Oh, Eunice (28 August 2009). "Emily Blunt & John Krasinski Are Engaged". People. Retrieved 24 August 2012. 
    28. Jump up ^ "Emily Blunt, John Krasinski Wed in Italy!". Us Weekly. Retrieved 1 November 2011. 
    29. Jump up ^ Eggenberger, Nicole (16 February 2014). "Emily Blunt Gives Birth, Welcomes Daughter Hazel With Husband John Krasinski". Us Weekly. Retrieved 16 February 2014. 
    30. Jump up ^ "Stanley Tucci Engaged To Emily Blunt's Sister Felicity!". US Weekly. Retrieved 16 April 2012. 
    31. Jump up ^ "Hunger Games Star Stanley Tucci Secretly Marries Emily Blunt's Sister, Felicity". E Online. Retrieved 24 August 2012. 
    32. Jump up ^ "Sebastian Blunt, actor". Retrieved 28 April 2012. 
    33. Jump up ^ "Emily Blunt on How She Overcame Her Stutter". vulture.com. 8 June 2011. Retrieved 15 October 2012. 
    34. Jump up ^ "Staff and Board of Directors". Retrieved 15 October 2012. 
    35. Jump up ^ WORLD EXCLUSIVE! New Confirmed Casting For the INTO THE WOODS Movie, Starring Streep & Depp Broadway World, Retrieved 27 July 2013
    36. Jump up ^ Taylor, Ella (1 March 2009). "Down to Earth, Even When Off the Wall". The New York Times. Retrieved 7 December 2009. 

External links

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Nicole Kidman

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

 

Description: Nicole Kidman 2, 2013.jpg

Nicole Kidman at 2013 Cannes Film Festival

Born

Nicole Mary Kidman
(1967-06-20) 20 June 1967 (age 47)
Honolulu, Hawaii, United States

Residence

Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
Nashville, Tennessee, U.S.

Citizenship

Australian and American (dual)

Occupation

Actress, singer, producer

Years active

1983–present

Height

5 ft 11 in (1.80 m) [1]

Spouse(s)

Tom Cruise (m. 1990; div. 2001)
Keith Urban (m. 2006)

Children

4

Relatives

Antonia Kidman (sister)

Website

www.nicolekidmanofficial.com

Nicole Mary Kidman, AC (born 20 June 1967[2]) is an American born Australian actress, singer[3][4] and film producer.[5] Kidman's breakthrough film role was in the 1989 thriller Dead Calm. Following several films in the early 1990s, she came to worldwide recognition for her performances in Days of Thunder (1990), Far and Away (1992), and Batman Forever (1995). She followed these with other successful films in the late 1990s.

 

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Her performance in the musical Moulin Rouge! (2001) earned her second Golden Globe Award and first Academy Award nomination for Best Actress. Her performance as Virginia Woolf in the drama film The Hours (2002) received critical acclaim and earned Kidman the Academy Award for Best Actress and Silver Bear for Best Actress at Berlin film festival.

Kidman's other notable films include To Die For (1995), Eyes Wide Shut (1999), The Others (2001), Cold Mountain (2003), Dogville (2003), The Interpreter (2005) and Australia (2008). Her performances in Birth (2004) and The Paperboy (2012) earned her Golden Globe nominations for best actress and supporting actress, respectively. Her performance in 2010's Rabbit Hole (which she also produced) earned Kidman further accolades, including a third Academy Award nomination for Best Actress. In 2012, she earned her first Primetime Emmy Award nomination for Outstanding Lead Actress in a Miniseries or a Movie for her role in Hemingway & Gellhorn.

Kidman has been a Goodwill Ambassador for UNICEF since 1994[6] and for UNIFEM since 2006.[7] In 2006, Kidman was made a Companion of the Order of Australia,[8] and was also the highest-paid actress in the motion picture industry.[9] As a result of being born to Australian parents in Hawaii, Kidman has dual citizenship in Australia and the United States.[10] Kidman founded and owns the production company Blossom Films.

Early life

Nicole Kidman was born in Honolulu, Hawaii, while her Australian parents were temporarily in the United States on educational visas. Kidman can therefore claim citizenship in Australia and the United States.[11] Her father, Antony David Kidman, is a biochemist, clinical psychologist, and author.[12][13] Her mother, Janelle Ann (née Glenny), is a nursing instructor who edits her husband's books and was a member of the Women's Electoral Lobby. Kidman's ancestry includes Scottish and Irish.[14] At the time of Kidman's birth, her father was a graduate student at the University of Hawaii at Manoa. He soon became a visiting fellow at the National Institute of Mental Health of the United States. Opposed to the war in Vietnam, which was causing social unrest in both Australia and the United States, Kidman's parents participated in anti-war protests while they were living in Washington, D.C.[15] The family returned to Australia when Kidman was four and her parents now live on Sydney's North Shore. Kidman has a younger sister, Antonia Kidman, a journalist and TV presenter.[16]

Kidman attended Lane Cove Public School and North Sydney Girls' High School. She was enrolled in ballet at three and showed her natural talent for acting in her primary and high school years.[17] Kidman revealed she was timid as a child, saying, "I am very shy – really shy – I even had a stutter as a kid, which I slowly got over, but I still regress into that shyness. So I don't like walking into a crowded restaurant by myself; I don't like going to a party by myself."[18] In 1984, her mother was diagnosed with breast cancer, which caused Kidman to temporarily halt her education and help provide for the family by working as a massage therapist at age seventeen.[17] She studied at the Victorian College of the Arts in Melbourne, Victoria, and at the Phillip Street Theatre in Sydney, with actress and friend Naomi Watts who had attended the same high school.[17] This was followed by attending the Australian Theatre for Young People.[17] Here she took up drama, mime and performing in her teens, finding acting to be a refuge. Due to her fair skin and naturally red hair, the Australian sun forced the young Kidman to rehearse in halls of the theatre. A regular at the Phillip Street Theatre, she received both encouragement and praise to pursue acting full-time.[19]

Career

1983–1994

In 1983, aged 16, Kidman made her film debut in a remake of the Australian holiday season favourite Bush Christmas.[19] By the end of 1983, she had a supporting role in the television series Five Mile Creek and began gaining popularity in the mid-1980s after appearing in several film roles, including BMX Bandits, Watch the Shadows Dance, and the romantic comedy Windrider (1986), which earned Kidman attention due to her racy scenes. Also during the decade, she appeared in several Australian productions, including the soap opera A Country Practice[20] and the miniseries Vietnam (1986).[21] She also made guest appearances on Australian television programs and TV movies. She also appeared in Sesame Street.

In 1988, Kidman appeared in Emerald City, based on the play of the same name. The Australian film earned her an Australian Film Institute for Best Supporting Actress. Kidman next starred in Dead Calm (1989) as Rae Ingram, playing the wife of a naval officer. The thriller garnered strong reviews and brought Kidman to international recognition; Variety commented: "Throughout the film, Kidman is excellent. She gives the character of Rae real tenacity and energy."[22] Meanwhile, critic Roger Ebert noted the excellent chemistry between the leads, stating, "Kidman and Zane do generate real, palpable hatred in their scenes together."[23] She followed that up with the Australian miniseries Bangkok Hilton. She next moved on to star alongside her then-boyfriend and future husband, Tom Cruise, in the 1990 auto racing film Days of Thunder, playing a young doctor who falls in love with a NASCAR driver. This was Kidman's American debut and was among the highest-grossing films of the year.[24]

In 1991, she co-starred with former classmate and friend Naomi Watts and Thandie Newton in the Australian independent film Flirting. Kidman and Watts portrayed two high school girls in this coming of age story, which won the Australian Film Institute Award for Best Film.[25] That same year, her work in the film Billy Bathgate earned Kidman her first Golden Globe Award nomination, for Best Supporting Actress. The New York Times, in its film review, called her "a beauty with, it seems, a sense of humor".[26] The following year, she and Cruise re-teamed for Ron Howard's Irish epic Far and Away (1992), which was a modest critical[27][28] and commercial[29] success. In 1993, she starred in My Life opposite Michael Keaton[30] and the thriller, Malice opposite Alec Baldwin.[31]

1995–2003

In 1995, Kidman appeared in her highest-grossing live-action film (as of 2011),[32] playing Dr. Chase Meridian, the damsel in distress, in the superhero film Batman Forever, opposite Val Kilmer as the film's title character. That same year Kidman appeared in Gus Van Sant's critically acclaimed To Die For, earning praise, including winning her first Golden Globe for her portrayal of murderous newscaster Suzanne Stone Maretto.[33][34] Kidman next appeared in The Portrait of a Lady (1996), based on the novel the same name, alongside, Barbara Hershey, John Malkovich and Mary-Louise Parker. The following year she appeared in the action-thriller The Peacemaker (1997) as White House nuclear expert Dr. Julia Kelly, opposite George Clooney. The film received mixed reviews but grossed some $110,000,000 worldwide.[35][36] That same year she appeared opposite Sandra Bullock in the poorly received fantasy Practical Magic as a modern-day witch.[37] Kidman returned to her work on stage the same year in the David Hare play The Blue Room, which opened in London.[38]

Description: http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/b/ba/Nicole_kidman3cropped.jpg/170px-Nicole_kidman3cropped.jpg

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Kidman at the 2001 Cannes Film Festival promoting her film, Moulin Rouge!

In 1999, Kidman reunited with then husband, Tom Cruise, to portray a married couple in Eyes Wide Shut, the final film of Stanley Kubrick. The film opened to generally positive reviews but was subject to censorship controversies due to the explicit nature of its sex scenes.[39] The film received further attention following Kubrick's death shortly before its release. After brief hiatus and a highly publicized divorce from Cruise,[40] Kidman returned to the screen to play a mail-order bride in the British-American drama Birthday Girl.[41] In 2001, Kidman appeared in two of her most critically and commercially successful films. In the first she played the cabaret actress and courtesan Satine in Baz Luhrmann's musical Moulin Rouge!, opposite Ewan McGregor. Subsequently, Kidman received her second Golden Globe Award, for Best Actress in a Motion Picture Musical or Comedy, as well as other acting awards. She also received her first Academy Award nomination, for Best Actress. Also in 2001, she had a well-received starring role in Alejandro Amenábar's Spanish horror film The Others as Grace Stewart. Grossing over $210,947,037 worldwide, the film also earned several Goya Awards award nominations, including a Best Actress nomination for Kidman. Additionally she received her second BAFTA and fifth Golden Globe nominations.[42]

In 2003, Kidman won critical praise for her portrayal of Virginia Woolf in Stephen Daldry's The Hours, which also featured Meryl Streep and Julianne Moore. Kidman wore prosthetics that were applied to her nose making her almost unrecognisable playing the author during her time in 1920s England, and her bouts with depression and mental illness while trying to write her novel, Mrs. Dalloway. The film earned positive notices and several nominations, including for an Academy Award for Best Picture. The New York Times wrote that, "Kidman tunnels like a ferret into the soul of a woman besieged by excruciating bouts of mental illness. As you watch her wrestle with the demon of depression, it is as if its torment has never been shown on the screen before. Directing her desperate, furious stare into the void, her eyes not really focusing, Ms. Kidman, in a performance of astounding bravery, evokes the savage inner war waged by a brilliant mind against a system of faulty wiring that transmits a searing, crazy static into her brain".[43]

Kidman won numerous critics' awards, including her first BAFTA, third Golden Globe, and the Academy Award for Best Actress. As the first Australian actress to win an Academy Award, Kidman made a teary acceptance speech about the importance of art, even during times of war, saying, "Why do you come to the Academy Awards when the world is in such turmoil? Because art is important. And because you believe in what you do and you want to honour that, and it is a tradition that needs to be upheld."[44] Following her Oscar win, Kidman appeared in three very different films in 2003. The first, a leading role in Dogville, by Danish director Lars von Trier, was an experimental film set on a bare soundstage. The second was an adaptation of Philip Roth's novel The Human Stain, opposite Anthony Hopkins. Her third film, Anthony Minghella's war drama Cold Mountain, was a critical and commercial success. Kidman appeared opposite Jude Law and Renée Zellweger, playing Southerner Ada Monroe, who is in love with Law's character and separated by the Civil War. TIME magazine wrote, "Kidman takes strength from Ada's plight and grows steadily, literally luminous. Her sculptural pallor gives way to warm radiance in the firelight".[45] The film garnered several award nominations and wins for its actors; Kidman received her sixth Golden Globe nomination at the 61st Golden Globe Awards for Best Actress.[46]

2004–2009[edit]

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Nicole Kidman in August 2006, prior to the start of filming as Marisa Coulter in The Golden Compass

In 2004 she appeared in the film, Birth, which received controversy over a scene in which Kidman shares a bath with her co-star, 10-year-old Cameron Bright. At a press conference at the Venice Film Festival, Kidman addressed the controversy saying, "It wasn't that I wanted to make a film where I kiss a 10-year-old boy. I wanted to make a film where you understand love".[47] Though the film received negative to mixed reviews, Kidman earned her seventh Golden Globe nomination, for Best Actress – Motion Picture. That same year she appeared in the black comedy-science-fiction film The Stepford Wives, a remake of the 1975 film of the same name. Kidman appeared in the lead role as Joanna Eberhart, a successful producer. The film, directed by Frank Oz, was critically panned and a commercial failure. The following year, Kidman appeared opposite Sean Penn in the Sydney Pollack thriller The Interpreter, playing UN translator Silvia Broome. Also that year she starred in Bewitched, based on the 1960s TV sitcom of the same name, opposite Will Ferrell. Both Kidman and Ferrell earned that year's Razzie Award for "Worst Screen Couple". Neither film fared well in the United States, with box office sales falling well short of the production costs, but both films fared well internationally.[48][49]

In conjunction with her success in the film industry, Kidman became the face of the Chanel No. 5 perfume brand. She starred in a campaign of television and print ads with Rodrigo Santoro, directed by Moulin Rouge! director Baz Luhrmann, to promote the fragrance during the holiday seasons of 2004, 2005, 2006, and 2008. The three-minute commercial produced for Chanel No. 5 made Kidman the record holder for the most money paid per minute to an actor after she reportedly earned US$12million for the three-minute advert.[50] During this time, Kidman was also listed as the 45th Most Powerful Celebrity on the 2005 Forbes Celebrity 100 List. She made a reported US$14.5 million in 2004–2005. On People magazine's list of 2005's highest paid actresses, Kidman was second behind Julia Roberts, with US$16–17 million per-film price tag.[51] Nintendo in 2007 announced that Kidman would be the new face of Nintendo's advertising campaign for the Nintendo DS game More Brain Training in its European market.[52]

Kidman portrayed photographer Diane Arbus in the biography Fur (2006), opposite Robert Downey, Jr.. Though the film was released to mixed reviews, both Kidman and Downey Jr. received praise for their performances. She also lent her voice to the animated film Happy Feet (2006), which grossed over US$384 million worldwide. In 2007, she starred in the science-fiction movie The Invasion directed by Oliver Hirschbiegel, a remake of the 1956 Invasion of the Body Snatchers that proved a critical and commercial failure. She also played opposite Jennifer Jason Leigh and Jack Black in Noah Baumbach's comedy-drama Margot at the Wedding, released to positive reviews and earning Kidman a Satellite Award nomination for Best Actress – Musical or Comedy. She then starred in the commercially successful fantasy-adventure, The Golden Compass (2007), playing the villainous Marisa Coulter.

In 2008, she reunited with Moulin Rouge! director Baz Luhrmann in the Australian period film Australia, set in the remote Northern Territory during the Japanese attack on Darwin during World War II. Kidman played opposite Hugh Jackman as an Englishwoman feeling overwhelmed by the continent. Despite the film's mixed reviews, the acting was praised and the movie was a box office success worldwide.[53] Kidman was originally set to star in the post-World War II German drama, The Reader, working with previous collaborators Sydney Pollack and Anthony Minghella, but due to her pregnancy prior to filming she had to back out.[54] The role went to Kate Winslet, who ultimately won the Oscar for Best Actress, which Kidman presented to her during the 81st Academy Awards.[55] Kidman appeared in the 2009 Rob Marshall musical Nine, portraying the Federico Fellini-like character's muse, Claudia Jenssen. She was featured alongside fellow Oscar winners Daniel Day-Lewis, Judi Dench, Marion Cotillard, Penélope Cruz and Sophia Loren. Kidman's, whose screen time was brief compared to the other actresses, performed the musical number "Unusual Way" alongside Day-Lewis. Although the film was released to mixed reviews, it received several Golden Globe and Academy Award nominations, and earned Kidman a fourth Screen Actors Guild Award nomination, as part of the Outstanding Cast.

2010–present

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Kidman at Tropfest 2012

In 2010, she starred with Aaron Eckhart in the film adaptation of the Pulitzer Prize-winning play Rabbit Hole, for which she vacated her role in the Woody Allen picture You Will Meet a Tall Dark Stranger.[56] Her work on Rabbit Hole earned her critical acclaim, and received nominations for the Academy Awards, Golden Globe Awards and Screen Actors Guild Awards. She lent her voice to a promotional video that Australia used to support its bid to host the 2018 FIFA World Cup.[57] TV Guide reported in 2008 that Kidman will star in The Danish Girl, a film adaptation of the novel of the same name, playing Lili Elbe, the world's first postoperative transsexual.[58] Screen Daily reported that shooting would begin in Germany in July 2011.[59] However the project has been delayed following the exit of the director, Lasse Hallström and Kidman's co-star Rachel Weisz.[60] In 2009, Variety said that she would produce and star in a film adaptation of the Chris Cleave novel Little Bee, in association with BBC Films.[61]

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Kidman promoting the film Grace of Monaco at the 2014 Cannes Film Festival, with co-star Paz Vega

In June 2010, TV Guide announced that Kidman and Clive Owen will star in an HBO film about Ernest Hemingway and his relationship with Martha Gellhorn. entitled Hemingway & Gellhorn. The film, directed by Philip Kaufman,[62] began shooting in March 2011, with an air date scheduled for 2012.[63] She also starred alongside Nicolas Cage in director Joel Schumacher's action-thriller Trespass, with the stars playing a married couple taken hostage.[64] On 17 September 2010, ContactMusic. com said Kidman would return to Broadway to portray Alexandra Del Lago in David Cromer's revival of Tennessee Williams' Sweet Bird of Youth, with Scott Rudin producing.[65] On 30 August 2011, Cromer spoke to The New York Times and explained that the production would not meet its original fall 2011 revival date but that it remains an active project.[66]

In June 2011, Kidman was cast in Lee Daniels' adaptation of the Pete Dexter novel, The Paperboy;[67] she began filming on the thriller on 1 August 2011, and The Paperboy was released in 2012. In the film, she portrayed death row groupie Charlotte Bless, and performed sex scenes that she claims not to have remembered until seeing the finished film. "I was like okay, so that's what I did," she said.[68] Kidman co-starred in Park Chan-wook's Stoker (2013).[69] In April 2012, various sources, including Variety, announced that Kidman was in talks to star in upcoming Grace Kelly biopic Grace of Monaco. The film will focus on the 1962 crisis, in which Charles de Gaulle blockaded the tiny principality, angered by Monaco's status as a tax haven for wealthy French subjects.[70] In 2012, Kidman's audiobook recording of Virginia Woolf's To the Lighthouse was released at Audible.com.[71] In April 2013 she was selected as a member of the main competition jury at the 2013 Cannes Film Festival.[72]

Singing

Her collaboration with Ewan McGregor on "Come What May" peaked at No.27 in the UK Singles Chart.[73] Later she collaborated with Robbie Williams on "Somethin' Stupid", a cover version for Williams' swing covers album Swing When You're Winning. It peaked at No.8 in the Australian ARIAnet Singles Chart, and at No.1 for three weeks in the UK.[74] In 2006, while voicing a role in the animated movie Happy Feet, she provided vocals for Norma Jean's "heartsong," a slightly altered version of "Kiss" by Prince.[75] Kidman sang in Rob Marshall's movie musical Nine.[76]

Personal life

Relationships and children

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Kidman with husband Keith Urban at the 2009 American Music Awards

Kidman has been married twice: first to actor Tom Cruise, and now to country singer Keith Urban. She has an adopted son and daughter with Cruise as well as two biological daughters with Urban. Kidman met Cruise in November 1989 on the set of their 1990 movie Days of Thunder. She and Cruise were married on Christmas Eve 1990 in Telluride, Colorado. The couple adopted a daughter, Isabella Jane (born 1992),[77] and a son, Connor Anthony (born 1995).[77] On 5 February 2001, the couple's spokesperson announced their separation.[78] Cruise filed for divorce two days later, and the marriage was dissolved in August of that year, with Cruise citing irreconcilable differences.[79] In her 2007 interview with Marie Claire, Kidman noted the incorrect reporting of the ectopic pregnancy early in her marriage. "It was wrongly reported [as miscarriage], by everyone who picked up the story." "So it's huge news, and it didn't happen."[80] In the June 2006 issue of Ladies' Home Journal, she said she still loved Cruise: "He was huge; still is. To me, he was just Tom, but to everybody else, he is huge. But he was lovely to me and I loved him. I still love him." In addition, she has expressed shock about their divorce.[81]

Prior to marrying Cruise, Kidman lived with Australian stage actor Marcus Graham in the late 1980s.[82] In the mid-1980s, she dated her Windrider co-star Tom Burlinson,[83][84] whom she lived with on and off for three years, according to biographer Andrew Morton.[85] Robbie Williams stated that he had a short romance with Kidman on her yacht in 2004. Kidman met her second husband, Australian country singer Keith Urban, at G'Day LA, an event honouring Australians, in January 2005. They married on 25 June 2006, at Cardinal Cerretti Memorial Chapel in the grounds of St Patrick's Estate, Manly in Sydney.[86][87] They maintain homes in Sydney, Sutton Forest (New South Wales, Australia), Los Angeles,[88] and Nashville (Tennessee, USA).[89] The couple's first daughter, Sunday Rose Kidman Urban, was born in 2008, in Nashville.[90] Kidman's father said the daughter's middle name was after Urban's late grandmother, Rose.[91] In 2010, Kidman and Urban had their second daughter, Faith Margaret Kidman Urban, via surrogacy[92] at Nashville's Centennial Women's Hospital. Faith's middle name is after Kidman's late grandmother.[93][94]

Religious and political views

Kidman is a Roman Catholic.[95] She attended Mary Mackillop Chapel in North Sydney. Following criticism of The Golden Compass by Catholic leaders[96] as anti-Catholic,[97] Kidman told Entertainment Weekly that "the Catholic Church is part of her 'essence'", and that her religious beliefs would prevent her from taking a role in a film she perceived was anti-Catholic.[98] During her divorce from Tom Cruise, she stated that she did not want their children raised as Scientologists.[99] She has been reluctant to discuss Scientology since her divorce.[100] Kidman's name was in an advertisement in the Los Angeles Times in August 2006 that condemned Hamas and Hezbollah and supported Israel in the 2006 Israel-Lebanon war.[101] Kidman has donated to U.S. Democratic party candidates.[102]

Wealth, philanthropy and honours

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Kidman signing autographs at the premier of The Golden Compass in 2007

In 2002, Kidman first appeared on the Australian rich list published annually in the Business Review Weekly with an estimated net worth of A$122 million.[103] In the 2011 published list, Kidman's wealth was estimated at A$304 million, down from A$329 million in 2010.[104] Kidman has raised money for, and drawn attention to, disadvantaged children around the world. In 1994, she was appointed a goodwill ambassador for UNICEF,[6] and in 2004, she was honoured as a "Citizen of the World" by the United Nations.[105] Kidman joined the Little Tee Campaign for breast cancer care to design T-shirts or vests to raise money to fight the disease;[106] motivated by her mother's own battle with breast cancer in 1984.[107]

In the 2006 Australia Day Honours, Kidman was made a Companion of the Order of Australia (AC) for "service to the performing arts as an acclaimed motion picture performer, to health care through contributions to improve medical treatment for women and children and advocacy for cancer research, to youth as a principal supporter of young performing artists, and to humanitarian causes in Australia and internationally."[108] However, due to film commitments and her wedding to Urban, it was 13 April 2007 that she was presented with the honour.[109] It was presented by the Governor-General of Australia, Major General Michael Jeffery, in a ceremony at Government House, Canberra.[110] Kidman was appointed goodwill ambassador of the United Nations Development Fund for Women (UNIFEM) in 2006.[6] In this capacity, Kidman has addressed international audiences at UN events, raised awareness through the media and testified before the United States House of Representatives Committee on Foreign Affairs to support the International Violence against Women Act. Kidman visited Kosovo in 2006 to learn about women's experiences of conflict and UNIFEM's support efforts. She is the international spokesperson for UNIFEM's Say NO – UNiTE to End Violence against Women initiative.[111] Kidman and the UNIFEM executive director presented over five million signatures collected during the first phase of this to the UN Secretary-General on 25 November 2008.[112]

In the beginning of 2009, Kidman appeared in a series of postage stamps featuring Australian actors. She, Geoffrey Rush, Russell Crowe and Cate Blanchett each appear twice in the series: once as themselves and once as their Academy Award-winning character.[113] On 8 January 2010, alongside Nancy Pelosi, Joan Chen and Joe Torre, Kidman attended the ceremony to help Family Violence Prevention Fund break ground on a new international center located in the Presidio of San Francisco.[114][115]

Filmography

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Kidman at 83rd Academy Awards in February 2011

Main article: Nicole Kidman filmography

As of April 2013[update], Kidman's movies have grossed more than US$3 billion, with 17 movies making more than US$100 million.[116]

Discography

Main article: Nicole Kidman discography

Awards

Main article: List of awards and nominations received by Nicole Kidman

In 2003, Kidman received a Star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame. In addition to her 2003 Academy Award for Best Actress, Kidman has received Best Actress awards from the following critics' groups or award-granting organisations: the Hollywood Foreign Press (Golden Globes), the Australian Film Institute, Blockbuster Entertainment Awards, Empire Awards, Golden Satellite Awards, Hollywood Film Festival, London Critics Circle, Russian Guild of Film Critics, and the Southeastern Film Critics Association. In 2003, Kidman was given the American Cinematheque Award. She also received recognition from the National Association of Theatre Owners at the ShoWest Convention in 1992 as the Female Star of Tomorrow and in 2002 for a Distinguished Decade of Achievement in Film.

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Further reading

External links

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Naomi Watts

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

 

Description: Naomi Watts Cannes 2014.jpg

Watts at the 2014 Cannes Film Festival

Born

Naomi Ellen Watts
(1968-09-28) 28 September 1968 (age 45)
Shoreham, Kent, England

Occupation

Actress

Years active

1986–present

Partner(s)

Liev Schreiber (2005–present)

Children

2

Naomi Ellen Watts (born 28 September 1968) is a British actress.[1] She made her screen debut in the Australian drama film For Love Alone (1986) and then appeared in the television series Hey Dad..! (1990), Brides of Christ (1991) and Home and Away (1991) and alongside Nicole Kidman and Thandie Newton in the coming-of-age comedy-drama film Flirting (1991). After moving to America, Watts appeared in films, including Tank Girl (1995), Children of the Corn IV: The Gathering (1996) and Dangerous Beauty (1998) and had the lead role in the television series Sleepwalkers (1997–1998).

 

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After years as a struggling actress, Watts came to attention in David Lynch's psychological thriller Mulholland Drive (2001). The following year she enjoyed box-office success with The Ring (2002), the remake of a successful Japanese horror film. She then received nominations at the Academy Awards and the Screen Actors Guild Awards in the Best Actress categories for her portrayal of Cristina Peck in Alejandro González Iñárritu's neo-noir 21 Grams (2003). Her subsequent films include David O. Russell's comedy I Heart Huckabees (2004), the 2005 remake of King Kong, the crime-thriller Eastern Promises (2007) and the thriller The International (2009). Since then, Watts has portrayed Valerie Plame Wilson in the biographical drama Fair Game (2010) and Helen Gandy in Clint Eastwood's biographical drama J. Edgar (2011). For her leading role as Maria Bennett in the disaster film The Impossible (2012), she received second nominations for the Academy Award and Screen Actors Guild Award for Best Actress and a nomination for the Golden Globe Award for Best Actress.

In 2002, Watts was included in People Magazine's 50 Most Beautiful People. In 2006, she became a goodwill ambassador for Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS, which helps to raise awareness of AIDS-related issues. She has participated in several fundraisers for the cause, and she is presented as an inaugural member of AIDS Red Ribbon Awards.

Early life

Watts was born 28 September 1968, in Shoreham, Kent, England.[2][3] She is the daughter of Myfanwy Edwards (née Roberts), a Welsh antiques dealer and costume and set designer,[2] and Peter Watts, an English road manager and sound engineer who worked with Pink Floyd.[4][5] Her parents divorced when she was four years old.[5][6] After the divorce, Watts and her elder brother, Ben Watts, moved several times across South East England with their mother.[7] Peter Watts left Pink Floyd in 1974, and he and Myfanwy were later reconciled. Two years later, in August 1976, he was found dead in a flat in Notting Hill, of an apparent heroin overdose.[8][9]

Following his death, Watts' mother moved the family to Llanfawr Farm in Llangefni, on Anglesey in North Wales, where they lived with Watts' maternal grandparents, Nikki and Hugh Roberts, for three years. During this time, Watts attended a Welsh language school, Ysgol Gyfun Llangefni, where she carried out her studies.[8] She later said of her time in Wales: "We took Welsh lessons in a school in the middle of nowhere while everyone else was taking English. Wherever we moved, I would adapt and pick up the regional accent. It's obviously significant now, my being an actress. Anyway, there was quite a lot of sadness in my childhood, but no lack of love."[10] In 1978, her mother remarried (though she would later be divorced again)[11] and Watts and her brother then moved to Suffolk where she attended Thomas Mills High School.[7] Watts has stated that she wanted to become an actress after seeing her mother performing on stage and from the time she watched the 1980 film Fame.[5][12]

In 1982, when Watts was 14, she moved to Sydney, New South Wales in Australia (her maternal grandmother was Australian) with her mother, brother and stepfather.[5][13] Myfanwy established a career in the burgeoning film business, working as a stylist for television commercials, then turning to costume design, ultimately working for the soap opera Return to Eden.[8] After emigrating, Watts was enrolled in acting lessons by her mother; she auditioned for numerous television advertisements, where she met and befriended actress Nicole Kidman. Watts obtained her first role in the 1986 drama film For Love Alone, based on the novel of the same name by Christina Stead, and produced by Margaret Fink.[8]

In Australia, Watts attended Mosman High School and North Sydney Girls High School.[14] She failed to graduate from school, afterwards working as a papergirl, a negative cutter, and managing a Delicacies store in Sydney's affluent North Shore.[8] She decided to become a model when she was 18. She signed with a models agency that sent her to Japan, but after several failed auditions, she returned to Sydney.[5] There, she was hired to work in advertising for a department store, that exposed her to the attention of Follow Me, a magazine which hired her as an assistant fashion editor.[5][8] A casual invitation to participate in a drama workshop inspired Watts to quit her job and to pursue her acting ambitions.[8][15]

Regarding her nationality, Watts has stated: "I consider myself British and have very happy memories of the UK. I spent the first 14 years of my life in England and Wales and never wanted to leave. When I was in Australia I went back to England a lot."[16] She also has expressed her ties to Australia, declaring: "I consider myself very connected to Australia, in fact when people say where is home, I say Australia, because those are my most powerful memories."[17]

Career

1986–1992: Early work

Watts' career began in television, where she made brief appearances in commercials.[13] The 1986 film For Love Alone, set in the 1930s and based on Christina Stead's 1945 best-selling novel of the same name, marked her debut in film.[18] She then appeared in two episodes of the fourth season of the Australian sitcom Hey Dad..! in 1990. After a five-year absence from films, Watts met director John Duigan during the 1989 premiere of her friend Nicole Kidman's film Dead Calm and he invited her to take a supporting role in his 1991 indie film Flirting.[13][19] She starred opposite future Hollywood up-and-comers Kidman and Thandie Newton.[8] The film received critical acclaim and was featured on Roger Ebert's list of the 10 best films of 1992.[20] Also in 1991, she took the part of Frances Heffernan, a girl who struggles to find friends behind the walls of a Sydney Catholic school,[21] in the award winning mini-series Brides of Christ[22] and had a recurring role in the soap opera Home and Away as the handicapped Julie Gibson.[23] Watts was then offered a role in the drama series A Country Practice but turned it down, not wanting to "get stuck on a soap for two or three years", a decision she later called "naïve".[13][15]

1993–2000: Move to America, career struggles

Watts then took a year off to travel, visiting Los Angeles and being introduced to agents through Kidman.[7][8] Encouraged, Watts decided to move to America, to pursue her career further. In 1993 she had a small role in the John Goodman film Matinee and temporarily returned to Australia to star in three Australian films: another of Duigan's pictures, Wide Sargasso Sea; the drama The Custodian; and had her first leading role in the film Gross Misconduct, as a student who accuses one of her teachers (played by Jimmy Smits) of raping her.[13] Watts then moved back to America for good but the difficulty of finding agents, producers and directors willing to hire her during that period frustrated her initial efforts.[8]

When I came to America there was so much promise of good stuff and I thought, I've got it made here. I'm going to kick ass. Then I went back to Australia and did one or two more jobs. When I returned to Hollywood, all those people who'd been so encouraging before weren't interested. You take all their flattery seriously when you don't know any better. I basically had to start all over again. I get offered some things without auditioning today, but back then they wouldn't even fax me the pages of a script because it was too much of an inconvenience. I had to drive for hours into the Valley to pick up three bits of paper for some horrendous piece of shit, then go back the next day and line up for two hours to meet the casting director who would barely give me eye contact. It was humiliating.[15]

Though her financial situation never led her to taking a job out of the film industry, she experienced problems like being unable to pay the rent of her apartment and losing her medical insurance.[8][24] "At first, everything was fantastic and doors were opened to me. But some people who I met through Nicole [Kidman], who had been all over me, had difficulty remembering my name when we next met. There were a lot of promises, but nothing actually came off. I ran out of money and became quite lonely, but Nic gave me company and encouragement to carry on."[25]

She then won a supporting role in the futuristic 1995 film Tank Girl, winning the role of "Jet Girl" after nine auditions.[5] While the film was met with mixed reviews, it flopped at the box office, although it has gone on to become something of a cult classic.[26] Throughout the rest of the decade, she took mostly supporting roles in films[27] and occasionally considered leaving the business, but: "there were always little bites. Whenever I felt I was at the end of my rope, something would come up. Something bad. But for me it was 'work begets work'; that was my motto."[7][24]

In 1996, she starred alongside Joe Mantegna, Kelly Lynch and J.T. Walsh in George Hickenlooper's action-thriller Persons Unknown; alongside James Earl Jones, Kevin Kilner and Ellen Burstyn in the period drama Timepiece; in Bermuda Triangle, a TV pilot that was not picked up for a full series, where she played a former documentary filmmaker who disappears in the Bermuda Triangle;[28] and as the lead role in Children of the Corn IV: The Gathering, in which children in a small town become possessed under the command of a wrongfully murdered child preacher.[5]

In 1997, she starred in the Australian ensemble romantic drama Under the Lighthouse Dancing and also played the lead role in the short-lived television series Sleepwalkers.[8] In 1998, she starred alongside Neil Patrick Harris and Debbie Reynolds in the TV film The Christmas Wish, played the supporting role of Giulia De Lezze in Dangerous Beauty,[13] and provided some voice work for Babe: Pig in the City.[8] She said in an interview in 2012, "That really should not be on my résumé! I think that was early on in the day, when I was trying to beef up my résumé. I came in and did a couple days' work of voiceovers and we had to suck on [helium] and then do a little mouse voice. But I was one in a hundred, so I'm sure you would never be able to identify my voice. I probably couldn't either!"[29]

In 1999, she played Alice in the romantic comedy Strange Planet and the Texan student Holly Maddux in The Hunt for the Unicorn Killer, which was based on the real life effort to capture Ira Einhorn, who was charged with Maddux's murder.[30][31] In 2000, while David Lynch was expanding the rejected pilot of Mulholland Drive into a feature film, Watts starred alongside Derek Jacobi, Jack Davenport and Iain Glen in the BBC TV film The Wyvern Mystery, an adaptation of the novel of the same name by Sheridan Le Fanu that was broadcast in March of that year.[8]

Much of her early career is filled with near misses in casting, as she was up for significant roles in films such as 1997's The Postman and The Devil's Advocate and 2000's Meet the Parents, which eventually went to other actresses.[32] In an interview in 2012, Watts said, "I came to New York and auditioned at least five times for Meet the Parents. I think the director liked me but the studio didn't. I heard every piece of feedback you could imagine, and in this case, it was 'not sexy enough'."[33] Watts recalled her early career in an interview in 2002, saying, "It is a tough town. I think my spirit has taken a beating. The most painful thing has been the endless auditions. Knowing that you have something to offer, but not being able to show it, is so frustrating. As an unknown, you get treated badly. I auditioned and waited for things I did not have any belief in, but I needed the work and had to accept horrendous pieces of shit."[25]

2001–2004: Breakthrough

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Watts with filmmaker David Lynch at the 2001 Cannes Film Festival

Naomi Watts studied the Meisner Technique. In 1999, director David Lynch began casting for his psychological thriller Mulholland Drive. He interviewed Watts after looking at her headshot,[33] without having seen any of her previous work,[34] and offered her the lead role.[33] Lynch later said about his selection of Watts, "I saw someone that I felt had a tremendous talent, and I saw someone who had a beautiful soul, an intelligence—possibilities for a lot of different roles, so it was a beautiful full package."[35] Conceived as a pilot for a television series, Lynch shot a large portion of it in February 1999, planning to keep it open-ended for a potential series. However, the pilot was rejected. Watts recalled thinking at the time, "just my dumb luck, that I'm in the only David Lynch programme that never sees the light of day."[7] Instead, Lynch filmed an ending in October 2000, turning it into a feature film which was picked up for distribution. The film, which also starred Laura Harring and Justin Theroux, was highly acclaimed by critics and would become Watts' breakthrough. She was praised by critics, including Peter Bradshaw from The Guardian, who said, "Watts's face metamorphoses miraculously from fresh-faced beauty to a frenzied, teary scowl of ugliness."[36] and Emanuel Levy, who wrote, "... Naomi Watts, in a brilliant performance, a young, wide-eyed and grotesquely cheerful blonde, full of high hopes to make it big in Hollywood."[37] The film premiered at the 2001 Cannes Film Festival and received a large number of awards and nominations, including the Best Actress Award for Watts from the National Society of Film Critics and a nomination for Best Actress from the American Film Institute.[38] The surrealist film following the story of the aspiring actress Betty Elms, played by Watts, attracted controversy with its strong lesbian theme.[39][40]

Also in 2001, she starred in two short films, Never Date an Actress and Ellie Parker, and the horror film The Shaft, director Dick Maas' remake of his 1983 film De Lift.[8] In 2002, she starred in one of the biggest box office hits of that year,[8] The Ring, the English language remake of the Japanese horror film Ringu. Directed by Gore Verbinski, the film, which also starred Martin Henderson and Brian Cox, received favourable reviews and grossed around US$129 million domestically (equivalent to US$169.1 million in 2014).[41] Watts portrayed Rachel Keller, a journalist investigating the strange deaths of her niece and other teenagers after watching a mysterious videotape, and receiving a phone call announcing their deaths in seven days.[42] Her performance was praised by critics, including Paul Clinton of CNN.com, who stated that she "is excellent in this leading role, which proves that her stellar performance in Mulholland Drive was not a fluke. She strikes a perfect balance between scepticism and the slow realisation of the truth in regard to the deadly power of the videotape."[43] That year, she also starred in Rabbits, a series of short films directed by David Lynch; alongside several other famous British actors in the black comedy Plots with a View; and with Tim Daly in the western The Outsider.

The following year, she took the part of Julia Cook in Gregor Jordan's Australian film Ned Kelly opposite Heath Ledger, Orlando Bloom and Geoffrey Rush;[44] as well as starring in the Merchant-Ivory film Le Divorce, portraying Roxeanne de Persand, a poet who is abandoned by her husband Charles-Henri de Persand at the time she is pregnant. Roxeanne and her sister Isabel (Kate Hudson) dispute the ownership of a painting by Georges de La Tour with the family of Henri's lover. Entertainment Weekly gave the film a "C" rating and lamented Watts' performance: "I'm disappointed to report that Hudson and Watts have no chemistry as sisters, perhaps because Watts never seems like the expatriate artiste she's supposed to be playing".[45]

Her performance opposite Sean Penn and Benicio del Toro in director Alejandro González Iñárritu's 2003 drama 21 Grams earned Watts an Academy Award nomination as Best Actress later that year.[46] In the story, told in a non-lineal manner, she portrayed Cristina Peck, a grief-stricken woman living a suburban life after the killing of her husband and two children by Jack Jordan (Benicio del Toro), who started a relationship with the critically ill academic mathematician Paul Rivers (Sean Penn). She said of the nomination, "It's far beyond what I ever dreamed for – that would have been too far fetched".[47] She also was nominated for Screen Actors Guild Award for Outstanding Performance by a Female Actor in a Leading Role, as well as many other nominations and acclaim.[48] The New York Times praised her: "Because Ms. Watts reinvents herself with each performance, it's easy to forget how brilliant she is. She has a boldness that comes from a lack of overemphasis, something actresses sometimes do to keep up with Mr. Penn".[49] The San Francisco Chronicle wrote: "Watts is riveting, but she's much better in scenes of extreme emotion than in those requiring subtlety."[50]

She then starred alongside Mark Ruffalo in the well-received 2004 independent film We Don't Live Here Anymore.[8] The film is a drama which was based on the short stories We Don't Live Here Anymore and Adultery by Andre Dubus, and depicts the crisis of two married couples.[51] She reunited with Sean Penn in The Assassination of Richard Nixon, which was set in 1974. She played Marie Andersen Bicke, the wife of the would-be presidential assassin Samuel Byck (Penn).[52] Finally in 2004, she teamed up with Jude Law and Dustin Hoffman in David O. Russell's ensemble comedy I Heart Huckabees.[53]

2005–2008: Popular success

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Watts at the London premiere of Eastern Promises in 2007

In 2005, Watts starred and co-produced with director/screenwriter Scott Coffey her next film, the semi-autobiographical drama Ellie Parker, which depicted the struggle of an Australian actress in Hollywood.[54] The film began as a short film that was screened at the Sundance Film Festival in 2001 and was expanded into a feature-length production over the next four years. Film critic Roger Ebert praised Watts' performance: "The character is played by Watts with courage, fearless observation, and a gift for timing that is so uncanny it can make points all by itself."[55]

Watts returned in the lead role in the sequel to The Ring, The Ring Two. The film received several negative reviews,[56] but was a major success at the box office, with an over US$161 million worldwide gross (equivalent to US$194.4 million in 2014) and Watts was once again praised for her performance.[57] Her third film of the year was Marc Forster's psychological thriller Stay. Written by David Benioff, it also starred Ewan McGregor, Ryan Gosling and Bob Hoskins.[8]

Watts then starred in the 2005 remake of King Kong as Ann Darrow. Watts was the first choice for the role, portrayed by Fay Wray in the original film, with no other actors considered.[58] In preparation for her role, Watts met with Wray,[59] who was to make a cameo appearance and say the final line of dialogue, but she died during pre-production at the age of 96.[60] King Kong proved to be Watts' most commercially successful film yet. Helmed by The Lord of the Rings director Peter Jackson, the film won high praise and grossed US$550 million worldwide (equivalent to US$664.1 million in 2014).[61][62] The Seattle Post-Intelligencer praised her performance: "The third act becomes a star-crossed, "Beauty and the Beast" parable far more operatic and tragic than anything the original filmmakers could have imagined, exquisitely pantomimed by Watts with a poignancy and passion that rates Oscar consideration."[63]

About the evolution of her portrayals, Watts stated: "You'd better know why you're here as an actor ... I'm here to work out my shit, what my problems are and know who I am, so by cracking open these characters perhaps that shines a light on it a little bit better ... I know myself. I mean, of course I know myself better but the journey and search continue because hopefully we're evolving and growing all the time."[64]

Her next film was The Painted Veil with Edward Norton and Liev Schreiber. Watts played Kitty Garstin, the daughter of a lawyer, who marries Walter Fane (Norton) for his reputation as a physician and bacteriologist. The film centres on the relationship of the couple at the time they move to China, where Fane is stationed to study infectious diseases.[65] Comparing her portrayal with Greta Garbo's in the original movie, The San Francisco Chronicle wrote "Watts makes the role work on her own terms – her Kitty is more desperate, more foolish, more miserable and more driven ... and her spiritual journey is greater.[66]

For her only other film of that year, she provided the voice of a small role, Suzie Rabbit, in David Lynch's psychological thriller film Inland Empire.[67] Also that year, she was announced as the new face of the jewellers David Yurman and completed a photoshoot which was featured in the 2007 Pirelli Calendar.[12]

The following year, she appeared in David Cronenberg's crime thriller Eastern Promises with Viggo Mortensen. The film was released to critical acclaim for the film itself and for her performance.[68] A moderate box office success, it grossed US$56 million worldwide (equivalent to US$67.6 million in 2014).[69]

In 2007, Variety reported that Watts and George Clooney would star in the remake of Alfred Hitchcock's 1963 film The Birds, which would be directed by Casino Royale director Martin Campbell.[70] On 16 June 2009, Brad Fuller of Dimension Films stated that no further developments had taken place, commenting, "We keep trying, but I don't know."[71] Martin Campbell was eventually replaced as director by Dennis Iliadis in December 2009.[72][73] In an interview in December 2010, Watts said, "It sounded like a good idea, but the script's not there yet. I'd love to have been a Hitchcock blonde. A few directors I've worked with have been heavily influenced by Hitchcock, so I feel like I've gotten close."[74]

In 2007, she appeared in Michael Haneke's Funny Games, a remake of Haneke's 1997 film of the same name, alongside Tim Roth. In the film, she portrayed Ann Farber, who with her husband and son are held hostage by a pair of sociopathic teenagers. The film opened on 20 October 2007 at the London Film Festival.[75]

2009–present

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Watts at the 2011 Deauville American Film Festival.

After a short hiatus from acting following the birth of her two children, Watts returned to acting in 2009, starring alongside Clive Owen in the political thriller The International. She played a Manhattan assistant district attorney who partners with the titular agent to take down a bank.[76] During an interview, Watts commented on her role: "She was operating in this fast-moving world and was a great bouncing board for her colleague, Salinger, but also trying to balance that with motherhood as well, and I think I definitely relate to that now and hopefully other career mothers will too."[77] The International was well received by critics,[78] and grossed over US$60 million (equivalent to $66 million in 2014) worldwide.[79]

The same year, she appeared in the American drama Mother and Child, which was screened at the Sundance Film Festival.[80] She portrayed the role of Elizabeth, a lawyer who never knew her biological mother. Watts co-starred the film along with Annette Bening, Kerry Washington and Samuel L. Jackson.[81] Mother and Child received several favourable reviews, and Watts' performance was praised by Tom Long of Detroit News, who stated that she "has the ability to make such a ragged transition somehow work."[82] She was nominated for the Best Actress award at the Australian Film Institute Awards[83] and was also nominated for an Independent Spirit Award in the category of Best Supporting Female.[84]

Her next film, the Woody Allen comedy You Will Meet a Tall Dark Stranger, opened at the 2010 Cannes Film Festival on 15 May 2010.[85] She portrayed Sally, a woman who has a troubled marriage with author Roy, played by Josh Brolin. Antonio Banderas, Freida Pinto, Lucy Punch and Anthony Hopkins also co-starred in the film, which received mixed reviews from critics[86] and grossed over US$26 million (equivalent to $28.1 million in 2014).[87]

Also in 2010, she starred as Valerie Plame in the film Fair Game, which opened at the Cannes Film Festival in 2010, and was later released in the United States on 5 November 2010.[88] Based on Plame's memoir, Fair Game: My Life as a Spy, My Betrayal by the White House, it also marked the third pairing of Watts with Sean Penn after 21 Grams and The Assassination of Richard Nixon.[89] Watts was nominated for the Satellite Award for Best Actress for her performance in the film.[90] Boxoffice magazine wrote: "Watts doesn't get the big emotional scenes that have characterized much of her past work, instead she plays Valerie as a woman suddenly in a corner when her identity goes public. It's brilliantly understated and admirable work."[91] In July of that year, she was announced as the new face of clothing retailer Ann Taylor.[92]

In January 2010, she was cast in the thriller film Dream House, which was released in September 2011. Directed by Jim Sheridan, Watts starred in the film along with Daniel Craig and Rachel Weisz.[93] In October 2010, it was announced that Watts had landed the role of Marilyn Monroe in the film Blonde, which was set to start shooting in January 2011, but has been delayed.[94] In early 2011, Watts was cast in Clint Eastwood's J. Edgar, alongside Leonardo DiCaprio in the starring role. Watts played Edgar's secretary Helen Gandy.[95]

In 2012, Watts starred in The Impossible, a disaster drama based on the true story of María Belón and her family's experience of the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami, with Watts playing the lead role. The film received very positive reviews, with critics praising Watts' performance.[96] Deborah Young of The Hollywood Reporter said that "Watts packs a huge charge of emotion as the battered, ever-weakening Maria whose tears of pain and fear never appear fake or idealized."[97] Justin Chang of Variety magazine noted that "Watts has few equals at conveying physical and emotional extremis, something she again demonstrates in a mostly bedridden role."[98] Damon Wise of The Guardian said that "Watts is both brave and vulnerable, and her scenes with the young Lucas ... are among the film's best."[99] Watts went on to be nominated for the Academy Award, Golden Globe and Screen Actors Guild Award for Best Actress.[100]

In 2013 Watts had roles in the Australian drama film Adore, in Laurie Collyer's Sunlight Jr. and as Diana, Princess of Wales in director Oliver Hirschbiegel's film Diana.[100] She will also appear in filmmaker Gracie Otto's upcoming documentary film Chalky about British film and theatre producer Michael White, who is a close friend of Watts'.[101] In 2014, it was announced that Watts would play Evelyn Johnson-Eaton in the upcoming sequel The Divergent Series: Insurgent.[102]

Personal life

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Watts with her partner Liev Schreiber in 2012.

Her father's manic laugh can be heard in the Pink Floyd songs "Speak to Me" and "Brain Damage" from their 1973 album The Dark Side of the Moon.[103] Watts is pictured in her mother's arms with her father, brother, the band, and other crew members, in the hardback/softcover edition of drummer Nick Mason's autobiography of the band Inside Out.[104]

Watts was in a relationship with director Stephen Hopkins[103] in the 1990s and actor Heath Ledger[105] from August 2002 to May 2004. Since the spring of 2005, Watts has been in a relationship with actor Liev Schreiber. She confirmed in an interview in late January 2009 that Schreiber had in fact given her a ring (which she was not wearing at the time) but that neither of them wanted to rush into marriage.[106] Schreiber, known to play tricks on the media, had once before called her his wife in 2007, but later revealed that it was a joke.[107] The couple's first son, Alexander "Sasha" Pete, was born in July 2007 in Los Angeles, and their second son, Samuel "Sammy" Kai, in December 2008 in New York City.[108] After a temporary hiatus from acting, she returned to work with The International, her first project since becoming a mother.[109] Watts stated in April 2010 that she would have a third child if she could guarantee a baby girl.[110]

She considered converting to Buddhism after having gained interest for that religion during the shooting of The Painted Veil.[citation needed]She said of her religious beliefs, "I have some belief but I am not a strict Buddhist or anything yet".[111] She practices the Transcendental Meditation technique.[112] In 2002, she was featured in People Magazine's 50 Most Beautiful People.[113]

Charity work

In 2006, Watts became a goodwill ambassador for Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS, it helps to raise awareness of AIDS issues. She has used her high profile and celebrity to call attention to the needs of people living with this disease.[114] Watts participated in events and activities, including the 21st Annual AIDS Walk.[115] She is presented as an inaugural member of AIDS Red Ribbon Awards. She has participated in campaigns for fundraising. On 1 December 2009, Watts was meeting with United Nations Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon and joined the AIDS response at a dramatic public event commemorating World AIDS Day 2009.[116] During the event, she said: "It has been both unfortunate and unfair for HIV infection to be considered a shameful disease, for people living with HIV to be judged as blameworthy, and for AIDS to be equated with certain death. I have personally seen that dignity and hope have been strongest among those whose lives were changed by HIV."[117]

In 2011, she attended a charity polo match in New York City along with Australian actors Hugh Jackman and Isla Fisher, which was intended to raise money to help victims of the 2010 Haiti earthquake.[118]

Filmography

Main article: Naomi Watts filmography

Awards and nominations

Main article: List of awards and nominations received by Naomi Watts

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